Albert's Quiet Quest

Albert's Quiet Quest

Albert just wants to read his book in peace . . . why won't his friends give him some quiet? A delightful picture book about finding alone time from an internationally acclaimed illustrator.There are so many distractions in Albert's Mile End neighborhood, what's a book-loving introvert to do? Desperate for a quiet place to read, Albert storms out to the alley behind his house...

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Title:Albert's Quiet Quest
Author:Isabelle Arsenault
Rating:

Albert's Quiet Quest Reviews

  • Jane

    This little book just shot to the top of my favourite picks for 2019. I already knew I liked Isabelle Arsenault's illustrations -- I loved her work in

    -- but now she's on my *must read* list.

    To be honest, the first time I read through this book, I wasn't sure how much I liked this story. Some of the messaging didn't quite strike me the right way. But on my second read, I realized how truly delightful this book is.

    In this book we follow Albert as he lea

    This little book just shot to the top of my favourite picks for 2019. I already knew I liked Isabelle Arsenault's illustrations -- I loved her work in

    -- but now she's on my *must read* list.

    To be honest, the first time I read through this book, I wasn't sure how much I liked this story. Some of the messaging didn't quite strike me the right way. But on my second read, I realized how truly delightful this book is.

    In this book we follow Albert as he leaves his noisy house to find a quiet space to sit and read his book. Unfortunately, noisy people seem to cluster around him, and while he tries to ignore the hubbub for awhile, he eventually loses his temper when things just get too loud.

    The illustrations are on the simple side, but there is never any doubt what is happening on each page. There are so many things going on in this story that make it a great book for opening up discussions about empathy and appropriate reactions!

    I strongly recommend this book and I can't wait to get my hands on more of Arsenault's work.

  • David Schaafsma

    The second Mile End Kids Story written and illustrated by Isabelle Arsenault, the first being The Lost Pet, Albert's Quiet Quest is on the surface just a story about a kid who wants it quiet enough to read. He goes outside to do that, to be alone. When he gets outside he sees a painting of a beach scene and others again bother him with all their noise and activity and he explodes. The surprise is that the others quietly, one by one, join him in reading and friendship.

    It's a Goodreads

    The second Mile End Kids Story written and illustrated by Isabelle Arsenault, the first being The Lost Pet, Albert's Quiet Quest is on the surface just a story about a kid who wants it quiet enough to read. He goes outside to do that, to be alone. When he gets outside he sees a painting of a beach scene and others again bother him with all their noise and activity and he explodes. The surprise is that the others quietly, one by one, join him in reading and friendship.

    It's a Goodreads story of reading together! I mean, reading IS a solitary activity, but it can be s shared experience. I always look at others reading in parks, or at the beach or on trains, and sometimes (not usually), I note what they are reading and if they look up from the reading, I might even ask them about it. Libraries are a communal reading space, too, obviously.

    But in addition to that simple story, there's something else going on, complicating your understanding of what is going on in the book: What takes place in much of the book is at the beach that is featured in the painting that faces Albert when he is outside. Even though this is a book probably aimed for ages 4-8, I would say reading it with kids would promote discussion of what is actually happening. Some of what seems to be happening--increasingly overwhelming for Albert--are beach activities, as if they are at the beach, IN the picture. The imagination figures in this experience more and more.

    Two other interesting things: Albert's Quiet Quest has a turquoise cover and the book that Albert is reading has a turquoise cover. Also, Albert sometimes refuses invited participation in other activities because he is reading, when it is pretty clear he is not, at the moment we see him. What is going on? I think the reading/art/imagination relationship is important here.

    The art is lovely, as usual (and less lovely when it is noisy and busy, to make that point, crowding the page). Albert's Quiet Quest is about quiet, reading, friendship, art and the imagination. One of favorites in 2019.

  • Billie

    I am Albert. Albert is me.

  • Etienne

    Amazing illustrations. I really loved the art! The story itself is also quite good. A message and praise for quietness and tranquility, which is really right on my personal taste. But I the same time I have mixed feelings about the fact the the kid try to impose his wish to everybody...Still a very pretty and good book!

  • La Coccinelle

    Sometimes peace and quiet can be elusive. That's what Albert discovers when he goes out to the alley to read his book. Actually, he's just sitting there, daydreaming about reading on a beach. But as each of his friends comes along and starts to do their own activities, even his imagination starts to get cluttered and really,

    noisy. Finally, he can't take it anymore and he snaps at his friends, driving them all away... or so he thinks.

    Albert's frustration is something a lot of people

    Sometimes peace and quiet can be elusive. That's what Albert discovers when he goes out to the alley to read his book. Actually, he's just sitting there, daydreaming about reading on a beach. But as each of his friends comes along and starts to do their own activities, even his imagination starts to get cluttered and really,

    noisy. Finally, he can't take it anymore and he snaps at his friends, driving them all away... or so he thinks.

    Albert's frustration is something a lot of people will probably be able to relate to. His reaction toward his friends is not his finest hour, but to his credit, he does try to apologize. His friends obviously forgive him, and everything is all good.

    This might technically be a picture book, but the format is really more of a graphic novel. The illustrations are divided into panels, there's onomatopoeia everywhere, and all the speech is in balloons. So, really, it's a graphic novel for kids. But that doesn't make it any less enjoyable. The illustrations, done in a limited colour palette of black and white, orange, and turquoise, are quite cute. I've encountered Arsenault's work before in the adorable

    . These illustrations are just as charming and help to tell the story of a little boy who just wants some silence.

    I'd recommend this to anyone who's ever wanted to retreat into their imagination (or a good book) and enjoy some peace and quiet.

  • Hilary

    Beautiful illustrations in turquoise and orange tell of Albert's quest to find a quiet place to read his book. Going out to the back yard he finds an old picture of the beach and he imagines he is there, reading on the sand. Soon other children come out to play and Albert imagines them into his beach scene but the noise begins to grow. When Albert demands quiet they disappear and bring back books and chairs. When Albert apologises for being cross it's his turn to be shushed and they all laugh.

  • Mathew

    Albert’s Quiet Quest follows the latest adventures of Arsenault’s Mile End Kids series and has made me want to picked up the first: Colette’s Lost Pet. In this instalment, we find Albert, frustrated with the noise of his companions, in need of a quiet space. Heading outside he stumbles across an abandoned framed painting of the sea, sun and sand – a far flung idyll from his noisy neighbourhood. Whilst he imagines himself there, the Mile End crew descend on him and gradually intrude upon his imag

    Albert’s Quiet Quest follows the latest adventures of Arsenault’s Mile End Kids series and has made me want to picked up the first: Colette’s Lost Pet. In this instalment, we find Albert, frustrated with the noise of his companions, in need of a quiet space. Heading outside he stumbles across an abandoned framed painting of the sea, sun and sand – a far flung idyll from his noisy neighbourhood. Whilst he imagines himself there, the Mile End crew descend on him and gradually intrude upon his imagined vacation. Chaos ensues but from it comes a beautiful little message on the mutual, enjoyable silences of friendship.

    Arsenault manages all this with the use of direct speech alone and careful positioning, perspective and colour. Pace is just right throughout as is the framing to capture Albert’s sweeping adventure into the painting and the chaotic rumblings of his friends’ intrusion. What a wonderful series what echoes deeply of Schulz’s philosophies.

  • Nick Swarbrick

    Charming and inventive, a narrative where the only words are in the dialogue between the children, this explores relationships, imagination and the role of quiet. A sort of “Sign on Rosie’s Door” for a new generation?

  • Karrie

    Finding a quiet place to read is difficult for everyone, but Albert finds a great one. Then one by one friends come and cause a commotion, leading Albert to an outburst. The outburst causes a happy ending.

  • Abigail

    Seeking out a quiet spot where he can read, the eponymous Albert finds that when all of his neighborhood friends begin to arrive, the peace is slowly destroyed. Eventually he loses his temper, shouting at the other children and (seemingly) driving them away. Fortunately, they like books too, and all ends happily with a group reading session...

    I enjoyed French-Canadian author/illustrator Isabelle Arsenault's first picture-book about the children of Mile End -

    - so I

    Seeking out a quiet spot where he can read, the eponymous Albert finds that when all of his neighborhood friends begin to arrive, the peace is slowly destroyed. Eventually he loses his temper, shouting at the other children and (seemingly) driving them away. Fortunately, they like books too, and all ends happily with a group reading session...

    I enjoyed French-Canadian author/illustrator Isabelle Arsenault's first picture-book about the children of Mile End -

    - so I picked up

    with a sense of pleasant anticipation. Although Albert might not think so, there is a quiet charm to these stories focusing on a group of neighborhood children and their experiences together. I appreciated the humorous ending here, and (as always) thought Arsenault's artwork was lovely. Recommended to anyone who read and enjoyed the first story about Mile End.

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