Once More We Saw Stars

Once More We Saw Stars

Two-year-old Greta Greene was sitting with her grandmother on a park bench on the Upper West Side of Manhattan when a brick crumbled from a windowsill overhead, striking her unconscious. She is immediately rushed to the hospital. Once More We Saw Stars begins with this event, leading the reader into the unimaginable.But although it begins with the anguish Jayson and his wi...

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Title:Once More We Saw Stars
Author:Jayson Greene
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Edition Language:English

Once More We Saw Stars Reviews

  • Ashlee Tominey

    I marvel at the author’s ability to share such an intensely personal and heartbreaking story and to capture such a breadth of emotions and thoughts in the retelling.

    Sometimes the right book comes along to help process emotions you didn’t even know you had.

    This book cracked me open emotionally and left me a little softer in the end. It was much needed.

    Hand to those moved by the reading experience of When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi or Falling: A Daughter, a Father, and a Journey Back by

    I marvel at the author’s ability to share such an intensely personal and heartbreaking story and to capture such a breadth of emotions and thoughts in the retelling.

    Sometimes the right book comes along to help process emotions you didn’t even know you had.

    This book cracked me open emotionally and left me a little softer in the end. It was much needed.

    Hand to those moved by the reading experience of When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi or Falling: A Daughter, a Father, and a Journey Back by Elisha Cooper.

  • Cassidy

    The entire first half of this book made me sob. Having never lost someone close to me, I found the second half about their grief very interesting, overwhelming, and hopeful. All I am left with is wanting peace for every person in this book.

  • Madeleine

    This book, a true story written by a father who lost his two year old daughter in a freak accident, somehow pulls off the miraculous feat of being both crushingly sad and hauntingly beautiful. I have left a trail of tears throughout Manhattan in all the places I devoured this heartbreaking but lovely story. Put it on your to-read list now for when it is released in May 2019. The version I read was an advance copy.

  • Martha Kelly

    Incredibly moving and uplifting at the same time. Loved it.

  • Vivek Tejuja

    I am not a parent. I will never know what it is like to lose a child. To grieve for the loss of someone you have created, looked over, been paranoid over, and prayed to God that they live healthy and happy, and yet you have no control over what happens to them. The sheer helplessness and then the realisation after. Once More We Saw Stars by Jayson Greene is the book that makes you see the world through the eyes of a parent - what does it mean to lose a child, how should one grieve, how much shou

    I am not a parent. I will never know what it is like to lose a child. To grieve for the loss of someone you have created, looked over, been paranoid over, and prayed to God that they live healthy and happy, and yet you have no control over what happens to them. The sheer helplessness and then the realisation after. Once More We Saw Stars by Jayson Greene is the book that makes you see the world through the eyes of a parent - what does it mean to lose a child, how should one grieve, how much should grief take from you, and what it truly means to be able to move on (if there is ever such a thing).

    It isn't easy to read a book about the loss of a child. Of a two-year-old, who just wasn't there in the world. Of Greta whose life her father Jayson speaks of lovingly. Of the way you as a reader become a part of it and can't help but recollect the times you have felt that stabbing pain that doesn't seem to go away, and it does one fine day, and it comes back once in a while, making you sense loss more than ever. 

    Once More We Saw Stars is also a hopeful book in so many ways. It teaches you how to grieve perhaps, and understand that at the core we are all the same people. We feel the same things. Jayson Greene takes us through this journey of loss, grief, and the coping process. 

    The book's title is taken from Dante's Inferno, also telling us that Greta's parents will take their grief, make what they have to with it, and ultimately soar above. They will once again see the stars. The story is about love - of deep love and moments of transformation that Jayson presents with such clarity and in great abundance that you cry, weep, and sometimes smile with him, knowing that love will make it alright. 

    The book is full of memories. Of moments we live and some we do not and some we don't get a chance to. Jayson's clarity of thought - how he strings memory and presents them to us is stunning.  There is anger. There is frustration. There is also the knowing that life must carry on and in that process we know that love will remain. It will guide us and help us move ahead, to soldier on, to make us see the stars once more. 

  • Susan Jarrell

    Living in NY, one often comes upon books left for the taking on stoops. Out of one such offering last week—in fancy Ft. Greene no less—I picked this book up and my life is the better for it.

    I do not understand how Greene could write so descriptively and beautifully about moments that cut his soul to the quick. I have been in the environs of where he was following the unthinkable accident—my fourth son had a congenital defect diagnosed only 9 days before his due date. We ended up having a home b

    Living in NY, one often comes upon books left for the taking on stoops. Out of one such offering last week—in fancy Ft. Greene no less—I picked this book up and my life is the better for it.

    I do not understand how Greene could write so descriptively and beautifully about moments that cut his soul to the quick. I have been in the environs of where he was following the unthinkable accident—my fourth son had a congenital defect diagnosed only 9 days before his due date. We ended up having a home birth a couple blocks from Weil Cornell, and got him to the hospital when he was not yet 2 hours old.

    The social workers, surgeons, nurses and doctors, were known to us and the description of your experience in the PICU made my heart race with the remembering.

    I love the lack of religious affiliation.

    I loved this book.

    Anyone grappling with grief from the loss of a loved one would benefit from learning of Jayson and Stacy’s experience.

  • Amy

    I don’t have the words to describe how heartbreaking, poignant, haunting and brilliantly written this memoir is. I read it with tears streaming down my face.

  • Nigel

    There is a sense in which this is an almost unbearable story initially. The author's two year old daughter, Greta, is killed when a brick falls from a windowsill above where she is sitting. As a parent and grandparent I find this something I maybe would prefer not to think about I guess. However the author does offer his and the family's thoughts as they make they way through the trauma that follows this freak accident.

    While a fairly large first section looks at the event and the immediate after

    There is a sense in which this is an almost unbearable story initially. The author's two year old daughter, Greta, is killed when a brick falls from a windowsill above where she is sitting. As a parent and grandparent I find this something I maybe would prefer not to think about I guess. However the author does offer his and the family's thoughts as they make they way through the trauma that follows this freak accident.

    While a fairly large first section looks at the event and the immediate aftermath the book continues with the journey the parents take in their attempts to come to terms with, if not understand, what has happened to them. There is grief, beauty and love here and it can be very moving. If I have any reservations about this it would be about how well this very American story translate on the other side of the Atlantic. However it will be a story that many will love and will stay with anyone who reads it for a long time I'm sure.

  • Sarah

    An incredibly sad memoir written by a father whose daughter's life is cut short by a freak accident. Shortly after her second birthday, Greta Greene is struck in the head by a crumbling brick. Jayson Greene chronicles the aftermath of her death narrating his stages of grief and quest for some sense of relief from the emotions threatening to overwhelm him.

    Because neither Jayson nor his wife are religious people they seek out a variety of sources in an attempt to assign some meaning out to their t

    An incredibly sad memoir written by a father whose daughter's life is cut short by a freak accident. Shortly after her second birthday, Greta Greene is struck in the head by a crumbling brick. Jayson Greene chronicles the aftermath of her death narrating his stages of grief and quest for some sense of relief from the emotions threatening to overwhelm him.

    Because neither Jayson nor his wife are religious people they seek out a variety of sources in an attempt to assign some meaning out to their tragic loss. Throughout the book Greene describes their journey and the legacy Greta's short life has had on her grieving family.

  • Sandee

    Tearful by page four. Full on pain-in-chest sobbing by page 14. Then intermittent crying throughout. I mean, it was expected. I have a visceral reaction to grief and loss. And I don't mind the catharsis of it all. The memoir was tragic and hopeful. And for music lovers like myself, the sparse references were always a delight.

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