Once More We Saw Stars

Once More We Saw Stars

Two-year-old Greta Greene was sitting with her grandmother on a park bench on the Upper West Side of Manhattan when a brick crumbled from a windowsill overhead, striking her unconscious. She is immediately rushed to the hospital. Once More We Saw Stars begins with this event, leading the reader into the unimaginable.But although it begins with the anguish Jayson and his wi...

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Title:Once More We Saw Stars
Author:Jayson Greene
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Edition Language:English

Once More We Saw Stars Reviews

  • Ashlee Tominey

    I marvel at the author’s ability to share such an intensely personal and heartbreaking story and to capture such a breadth of emotions and thoughts in the retelling.

    Sometimes the right book comes along to help process emotions you didn’t even know you had.

    This book cracked me open emotionally and left me a little softer in the end. It was much needed.

    Hand to those moved by the reading experience of When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi or Falling: A Daughter, a Father, and a Journey Back by

    I marvel at the author’s ability to share such an intensely personal and heartbreaking story and to capture such a breadth of emotions and thoughts in the retelling.

    Sometimes the right book comes along to help process emotions you didn’t even know you had.

    This book cracked me open emotionally and left me a little softer in the end. It was much needed.

    Hand to those moved by the reading experience of When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi or Falling: A Daughter, a Father, and a Journey Back by Elisha Cooper.

  • Cassidy

    The entire first half of this book made me sob. Having never lost someone close to me, I found the second half about their grief very interesting, overwhelming, and hopeful. All I am left with is wanting peace for every person in this book.

  • Martha Kelly

    Incredibly moving and uplifting at the same time. Loved it.

  • Jt O'Neill

    This book is remarkable. I'll start with that. I'd read the reviews and requested it from the library but once I picked it up, I wasn't sure that it was such a good idea to read it. This memoir is the story of the tragic and unexpected death of the author's two year old child. Why would I want to read that? I have plenty of sadness and grief in my life. Why read about more? I decided to be brave and start it. I figured I didn't have to finish it.

    And the first half was brutal. Jayson Greene has a

    This book is remarkable. I'll start with that. I'd read the reviews and requested it from the library but once I picked it up, I wasn't sure that it was such a good idea to read it. This memoir is the story of the tragic and unexpected death of the author's two year old child. Why would I want to read that? I have plenty of sadness and grief in my life. Why read about more? I decided to be brave and start it. I figured I didn't have to finish it.

    And the first half was brutal. Jayson Greene has a way with words. His writing often borders on poetry . I am awed by how he could write so poignantly and beautifully about the details around the day his daughter was injured and the following days of heartbreaking but essential tasks. He paints both the light and joyful pictures of a two year old's life as well as the dark and despairing pictures of grieving parents, family, and friends and he does it with grace and eloquence. I found the pages almost unbearable to read.

    And so, after the second chapter I considered putting the book down forever. I wondered if maybe to continue reading would just not be a good idea for me. Too sad. I decided to look at the reviews on Goodreads and that's when I realized that there was more to this book than the day Greta died and the days following. I read reviews where people wrote of transformation and beauty, of strength and courage, of hope and a future. I decided to keep going. And when I did, I found all of those things.

    This turned out to be a book that reminds me to keep my eyes open for miracles. It reminds me that there is so much more going on than is visible. It showed me that grief hurts and grief heals. I highly recommend this memoir.

  • Vivek Tejuja

    I am not a parent. I will never know what it is like to lose a child. To grieve for the loss of someone you have created, looked over, been paranoid over, and prayed to God that they live healthy and happy, and yet you have no control over what happens to them. The sheer helplessness and then the realisation after. Once More We Saw Stars by Jayson Greene is the book that makes you see the world through the eyes of a parent - what does it mean to lose a child, how should one grieve, how much shou

    I am not a parent. I will never know what it is like to lose a child. To grieve for the loss of someone you have created, looked over, been paranoid over, and prayed to God that they live healthy and happy, and yet you have no control over what happens to them. The sheer helplessness and then the realisation after. Once More We Saw Stars by Jayson Greene is the book that makes you see the world through the eyes of a parent - what does it mean to lose a child, how should one grieve, how much should grief take from you, and what it truly means to be able to move on (if there is ever such a thing).

    It isn't easy to read a book about the loss of a child. Of a two-year-old, who just wasn't there in the world. Of Greta whose life her father Jayson speaks of lovingly. Of the way you as a reader become a part of it and can't help but recollect the times you have felt that stabbing pain that doesn't seem to go away, and it does one fine day, and it comes back once in a while, making you sense loss more than ever. 

    Once More We Saw Stars is also a hopeful book in so many ways. It teaches you how to grieve perhaps, and understand that at the core we are all the same people. We feel the same things. Jayson Greene takes us through this journey of loss, grief, and the coping process. 

    The book's title is taken from Dante's Inferno, also telling us that Greta's parents will take their grief, make what they have to with it, and ultimately soar above. They will once again see the stars. The story is about love - of deep love and moments of transformation that Jayson presents with such clarity and in great abundance that you cry, weep, and sometimes smile with him, knowing that love will make it alright. 

    The book is full of memories. Of moments we live and some we do not and some we don't get a chance to. Jayson's clarity of thought - how he strings memory and presents them to us is stunning.  There is anger. There is frustration. There is also the knowing that life must carry on and in that process we know that love will remain. It will guide us and help us move ahead, to soldier on, to make us see the stars once more. 

  • Dana Mackey

    This book broke my heart ten times over today. Strange, then, that I ultimately found it uplifting. Seems like a lot of uplifting stories can still wreck your heart every which way?

  • Amy

    I don’t have the words to describe how heartbreaking, poignant, haunting and brilliantly written this memoir is. I read it with tears streaming down my face.

  • Joanne  Clarke Gunter

    A heartbreaking book. You will cry. But that is a normal reaction to the random, accidental death of an innocent 2 year-old child. The book is interesting because it details how the author and his wife coped with the overwhelming grief of losing their beloved Greta and slowly moved forward to a hopeful and even happy life after her death. It is a painful journey. Many similar books have been written, but Jayson Greene is a gifted writer and tells their terrible story eloquently.

  • Leah K

    "I am the reminder of the most unwelcome message in human history: Children - yours, mine - they don't necessarily live".

    This book is absolutely heartbreaking. Jayson and Stacy have to deal with what no parent should have to - the death of their child. This book goes through their tribulations. The hardship. The never-ending pain. The writing was so beautiful. I cried so many times. As someone who has lost a child (albeit, in a very different manner), this man was writing everything I've struggl

    "I am the reminder of the most unwelcome message in human history: Children - yours, mine - they don't necessarily live".

    This book is absolutely heartbreaking. Jayson and Stacy have to deal with what no parent should have to - the death of their child. This book goes through their tribulations. The hardship. The never-ending pain. The writing was so beautiful. I cried so many times. As someone who has lost a child (albeit, in a very different manner), this man was writing everything I've struggled to say since my son's death in 2013. This man wrote my feelings. I found myself nodding. I got it. I related to the struggle of bringing a second child, after the first child's death, into this world. The complete and utter fear...and relief of it all.

    Once More We Saw Stars will stay with me for a long time. I don't think you have to have lost a child to get this book but I think this one hit extra hard and close to me. I want to thank this author for his words. Even though they were his words, his feelings, his struggled - I want him to know how much they meant to me. A definite 5 star book for me.

  • Nigel

    There is a sense in which this is an almost unbearable story initially. The author's two year old daughter, Greta, is killed when a brick falls from a windowsill above where she is sitting. As a parent and grandparent I find this something I maybe would prefer not to think about I guess. However the author does offer his and the family's thoughts as they make they way through the trauma that follows this freak accident.

    While a fairly large first section looks at the event and the immediate after

    There is a sense in which this is an almost unbearable story initially. The author's two year old daughter, Greta, is killed when a brick falls from a windowsill above where she is sitting. As a parent and grandparent I find this something I maybe would prefer not to think about I guess. However the author does offer his and the family's thoughts as they make they way through the trauma that follows this freak accident.

    While a fairly large first section looks at the event and the immediate aftermath the book continues with the journey the parents take in their attempts to come to terms with, if not understand, what has happened to them. There is grief, beauty and love here and it can be very moving. If I have any reservations about this it would be about how well this very American story translate on the other side of the Atlantic. However it will be a story that many will love and will stay with anyone who reads it for a long time I'm sure.

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