Girl Gone Viral

Girl Gone Viral

For seventeen-year-old Opal Hopper, code is magic. She builds entire worlds from scratch: Mars craters, shimmering lakes, any virtual experience her heart desires.But she can't code her dad back into her life. When he disappeared after her tenth birthday, leaving only a cryptic note, Opal tried desperately to find him. And when he never turned up, she enrolled at a boardin...

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Title:Girl Gone Viral
Author:Arvin Ahmadi
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Girl Gone Viral Reviews

  • Emma Giordano
  • L.A. Starks

    Slightly but not totally tongue-in-cheek trigger warning: absolutely not for students (and their parents) who are applying to colleges, especially Stanford. This book just ratchets up admissions anxiety a hundred-fold.

    Armadi has written about a fictional high school in Palo Alto but he himself went to TJ (Thomas Jefferson) and I wish he'd written about that instead. Still, Palo Alto is extremely cool--I love it--and this has the merit of keeping everything in one place. Opal's dedication to find

    Slightly but not totally tongue-in-cheek trigger warning: absolutely not for students (and their parents) who are applying to colleges, especially Stanford. This book just ratchets up admissions anxiety a hundred-fold.

    Armadi has written about a fictional high school in Palo Alto but he himself went to TJ (Thomas Jefferson) and I wish he'd written about that instead. Still, Palo Alto is extremely cool--I love it--and this has the merit of keeping everything in one place. Opal's dedication to finding out what happened to her father drives the narrative. (The answer, alas, is rather too predictable & the villains are unimaginative cardboard.)

    Ahmadi's tech/media & understanding of Silicon Valley culture/Palo Alto neighborhoods, right down Blue Bottle, Philz, and suicide-by-Caltrain, is outstanding.

    The use of the last name "Hopper" is a nice touch, a reference to early mathematician and computer programmer Grace Hopper.

    Ahmadi would have done well to just leave out Opal's mother's character. There is little meaningful interaction, so she's kind of a deux ex machina.

    The wide-eyed stuff about Stanford is cute, but feels a bit googly-eyed: 3% admission rate, the tension of college decision days, etc. Spoiler: Opal gets in, but is that because she's so amazing or because her mother is a Stanford dean? Ahmadi unfortunately had to load the dice, to the detriment of the strengths he has previously built up in Opal's character.

    Ahmadi absolutely gets the overwhelming power of social media and emotion correct and describes credible interactions among the group of four friends.

    Despite the points above, I do recommend Girl Gone Viral to readers of YA (except for those applying to college/Stanford), science thrillers, science fiction, and technothrillers.

  •  Amelia

    Ahhh slow paced book with a disappointing ending but very realistic characters and interesting concept = mixed feelings.

    When it comes to the characters, they are amazing. They are so realistic and I couldn't help but root for them, to feel their pain, to want them to succeed, to like them despite their mistakes. All of them were so. good. Opal was definitely an interesting MC because she was neither good nor bad. She made some questionable choices but you could understand why she did those thin

    Ahhh slow paced book with a disappointing ending but very realistic characters and interesting concept = mixed feelings.

    When it comes to the characters, they are amazing. They are so realistic and I couldn't help but root for them, to feel their pain, to want them to succeed, to like them despite their mistakes. All of them were so. good. Opal was definitely an interesting MC because she was neither good nor bad. She made some questionable choices but you could understand why she did those things. Secondary characters were layered as well and I liked all of them.

    Another thing I liked is the world building. The book is set in the future where technology is far more advanced and people are basically online 24/7 and everything is "tracked, filmed, shared, posted..". It's slightly scary but fascinating. But unfortunately, that's all I liked about this book.

    The plot starts out interesting enough - the author sets the main mystery and a couple of other plot lines. Unfortunately, none of them come through. The ending was very underwhelming and disappointing. I had dozens of crazy theories but it turned out bland and I was not impressed. There was also a bit of an open ending so you don't even know what the characters did with their lives - what they chose to do or anything. I was very frustrated to say the least XD

    Even though the plot moved very slowly, I wasn't bored because it was interesting enough learning about their world and seeing how these characters dealt with their problems. And yet...I can't give it more than 3 stars because the ending was so bad and it felt like I spent all this time reading it for nothing -.-

  • Lindsi (Do You Dog-ear?)

    I really dislike it when books end without actually ending.

    would have received a higher rating from me, if

    had been resolved at its conclusion. We s

    I really dislike it when books end without actually ending.

    would have received a higher rating from me, if

    had been resolved at its conclusion. We spend the entire book with Opal, a girl that has struggled with the disappearance of her father, as she tries to fight for answers. However, once she learns the truth, the story just stops. I wanted to know what she did with that information, and how it impacted what the world thought to be true.

    Opal set a lot of things in motion, and she was a catalyst for world's current political upheaval. She inadvertently made people acknowledge a truth they were afraid to admit to themselves. It has the world hurdling down a dangerous path, but the story stops before we see the consequences of her actions. Again.

    I really liked the scientific aspect of the story, and it was never too hard to follow. Although, there were some jokes and references that went over my head. I understood that they were being funny, and that's all that really mattered. It was also interesting to see how the world could potentially function with advanced technology. What would a world look like if robots were our doctors, drivers, and police force? What if we took bias and emotion out of the equation? I'm sure that it would be beneficial in some scenarios, but it's also a little scary in others. Empathy is a large part of what makes us human, and it's not really possible for a robot to perceive the world in the same way.

    I enjoyed Arvin Ahmadi's writing, and really liked reading this book, but I feel like he set me up for disappointment. I was really invested in the mystery surrounding Opal's father and his disappearance, and thought there would have been more resolution at the end. When she finally gets answers, the information doesn't fall perfectly into place. There were still jagged holes that never get addressed.

    Also, I felt like the author made a really big deal about her college admissions essay, but then it stopped being important. She was having a lot of trouble with the prompt, and even missed getting her application in for early consideration. A few months later, Moyo brings up her application (because even he knows that she hasn't been able to finish it), and she tells him that it's already been completed and submitted. When did that happen? It felt like a really big deal, and then it wasn't.

    Another issue I had was the author's use of

    late night talk show hosts. I'm very familiar with most of them, and his versions didn't really match up with the personalities I've experienced for myself. It's also supposed to be set in the future, and it felt weird to have Jimmy Fallon and James Cordon mentioned throughout the book. Seth Meyers played an even larger role, and it just felt

    somehow. I wish the author had created his own late night talk show hosts, and feel like it would have made the story more believable.

    Opal is a very self-absorbed and unapologetically selfish character, but I still enjoyed reading the book from her perspective. She's intelligent and driven, but easy to manipulate and quick to throw her friends under the bus. I dislike people that are willing to use their friends to further their personal goals, and would have liked a more considerate and thoughtful Opal. Moyo is their moral compass, but no one listens to him, and he easily succumbs to peer pressure. Shane is the wild card of their group, and it's clear that he's struggling with more than we're shown. I have no idea why they were friends, when it was clear Opal was self-serving, Moyo wanted to live without sacrificing his beliefs, and Shane had more issues than he was willing to share with everyone else.

    was a quick read that left me feeling mostly disappointed. There is very little resolution at the end, and the characters were unlikable and only show what's on the surface. I would have liked for the author to expand more on the characters, and the mystery surrounding Opal's father. Also, Opal has a nonexistent relationship with her mother that wasn't fully explained, especially since her mother wanted to be a part of her daughter's life. Opal's causal cruelty was unwarranted, and I wish she had been a more relatable character.

    Other things worth mentioning: There's an unnecessary romance and something that resembles a love triangle. Opal should have stood up for herself and her friends. There were very few adults in this book (even though it takes place on a school campus), and the few that were mentioned were creepy as hell.

  • Adah Udechukwu

    Girl Gone Viral was disappointing. It started well and then it went downhill.

    The novel lost it's compelling edge. I actually expected a lot from the title.

  • Emma

    3.5 stars. I really enjoyed the first 2/3 of this, thought it. Was a 5 star read but I found the last third to be an anti climax and felt a bit let down and disappointed.

  • Ꮗ€♫◗☿ ❤️ ilikebooksbest.com ❤️

    I liked the premise of this book and it started off solid, but I began to get a bit bored about half way through the book. Then at about 70%, things really picked up, but too much started happening. The main character began changing so much as to be unlikeable and the main plot that was described in the beginning didn’t even really come about until the last few pages, then it sort of ended with a bunch of open questions.

    The book was about Opal Hopper, who lost her fath

    I liked the premise of this book and it started off solid, but I began to get a bit bored about half way through the book. Then at about 70%, things really picked up, but too much started happening. The main character began changing so much as to be unlikeable and the main plot that was described in the beginning didn’t even really come about until the last few pages, then it sort of ended with a bunch of open questions.

    The book was about Opal Hopper, who lost her father seven years ago when he just disappeared one day. She doesn’t believe he is dead and believes a business associate of his and the creator of the most successful VR company in the world, knows something. So her and some of her friends at her high school create a VR talk show in order to win a contest for cash and to meet him.

    The book is sort of reminiscent of Ready Player One, but with more angst and it gets serious where RPO is witty and nostalgic. This book deals with more political issues of Privacy and Technology and has a Luddite political party.

    The first half of the book does well in character development with Opal and her best friend Shane and boyfriend Moyo. It is just that later in the book her relationships with them seemed to change and I didn’t really like the resolution.

  • Carien

    I wanted a bit more nuance to the messages this story contains.

  • Kathy - Books & Munches

    > GAMES?!

    > Ready Player One-twist?!

    > GAAAAMES?!

    Like, I loved Warcross, Wildcard AND Ready Player One so I can only assume I'd love this one as well.

    On the TBR you go, dearie!

  • Noha Badawi

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