Lent

Lent

From Hugo, Nebula, and World Fantasy Award-winning Jo Walton comes Lent, a magical re-imagining of the man who remade fifteenth-century Florence—in all its astonishing strangenessYoung Girolamo’s life is a series of miracles.It’s a miracle that he can see demons, plain as day, and that he can cast them out with the force of his will. It’s a miracle that he’s frie...

DownloadRead Online
Title:Lent
Author:Jo Walton
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Lent Reviews

  • Spencer Orey

    Amazing and thoughtful book with some epic twists. I always have really high expectations about new Jo Walton books, and this one still blew me away.

    As in, this bizarre book that twists together a bunch of famous priests and scholars in Renaissance Florence with some fantasy elements, made me stay up way too late to find out what would happen next. I had no idea I could find this kind of thing so fascinating, but I did.

    And on top of all that, Walton is always so good at weaving in p

    Amazing and thoughtful book with some epic twists. I always have really high expectations about new Jo Walton books, and this one still blew me away.

    As in, this bizarre book that twists together a bunch of famous priests and scholars in Renaissance Florence with some fantasy elements, made me stay up way too late to find out what would happen next. I had no idea I could find this kind of thing so fascinating, but I did.

    And on top of all that, Walton is always so good at weaving in politics and commentaries on social norms of the time.

    Really good.

  • Delany Holcomb

    I have no idea how Jo Walton concocted such an amazingly brilliant and original story, but "Lent" is one of the best books I have read in 2019. 15th century Christianity, demons, Hell, and metaphysics all come together in this absolutely remarkable story set during Renaissance Italy. Follow this tale of absurdity and piety and find yourself in worlds separate from our own and what it means to truly "know thyself".

  • Julie Davis

    How do I write about this book? It feels like a work of genius and I am badly in need of someone to discuss a few things with. However, until I have a friend who has also read it, this inadequate review will have to do.

    The book description tells the story just adequately enough to give you a sense of the atmosphere without spoiling the story. The main character, devout and talented priest Girolamo, can see demons and cast them into Hell. He's got the gift of prophecy. He is also a mo

    How do I write about this book? It feels like a work of genius and I am badly in need of someone to discuss a few things with. However, until I have a friend who has also read it, this inadequate review will have to do.

    The book description tells the story just adequately enough to give you a sense of the atmosphere without spoiling the story. The main character, devout and talented priest Girolamo, can see demons and cast them into Hell. He's got the gift of prophecy. He is also a most appealing character as we watch him try to make Florence into the Ark of God.

    This seems an unlikely topic for fantasy writer Jo Walton but she does love to take a topic and dive deep while she adds fantastic layers which enliven while adding insight to the main theme. Consequently, Lent is a melange of 15th century Catholic theology, Florentine and Vatican politics, demons, Hell, metaphysics, and friendship.

    Above all, surprisingly, it is a meditation on what it means to love God and what it means to be threatened with losing Him. I've seen a few reviewers say they're unclear about the point of the book, but to this Catholic it seems clear. And I like what I see. Even if you don't agree with me, you will be left with a lot of food for thought wrapped in an entertaining story. Highly recommended.

  • Rachel Best

    Jo Walton’s books are unpredictable, both like and unlike the others. This is a beautiful, touching story, that takes religion seriously but still finds room to play with it. I feel like Girolamo is a friend of mine now, and 15th century Florence a place I visited and loved. I think anyone should read this.

  • Antonio

    This book started out gently enough, then got interesting, and finally settled into a pleasant, slow cruise into a historical novel. Then around the all hell broke loose and the plot flew off the rails, hurtling down a ravine of gasps and OMGs into a new realm of storyland... a new realm I like a lot! If you need spoilers, I'm sure other reviews will have them, but I'm going to just leave this here with one of my uncommon five stars.

  • Jamie

    It seems like every year there’s a book that I want to beg people to read because I struggle to describe it, and it’s nothing like what they’d expect. This year, it’s this book.

    It’s beautiful. It’s delightful and unusual and quietly profound. It’s a master class in plot. Or rather, how to make plot not seem like plot. It’s the progression we get in real life: day to day events that aren’t much in themselves but accrue, layer upon layer, into unforeseen outcomes.

    And then, it’s a master class in

    It seems like every year there’s a book that I want to beg people to read because I struggle to describe it, and it’s nothing like what they’d expect. This year, it’s this book.

    It’s beautiful. It’s delightful and unusual and quietly profound. It’s a master class in plot. Or rather, how to make plot not seem like plot. It’s the progression we get in real life: day to day events that aren’t much in themselves but accrue, layer upon layer, into unforeseen outcomes.

    And then, it’s a master class in how to twist that plot every which way, over and over. Brilliant.

    Much like

    , where that David is now the canonical David for me, this feels like the canonical Savonarola. Mostly because— and this is the irony, given the book— he’s so completely and thoroughly human, more human than our versions of history let him be. Every character in the book springs off the page in bright flesh and blood and I love them for it.

    I want to marvel again at how Jo Walton crafts this story, but that would take pages of spoilery details. Just— highly recommended whether this book seems like your thing or not. I struggle to describe it. It’s that great.

  • Elizabeth Morgan

    This book is a Venn Diagram of People Who Like Jo Walton's Novels, People Who Like Historical Fantasy Fiction, People Who Like Medieval Theology, and People Who Like Humanism, and I am firmly at the centre.

  • Denise

    3.5 rounded up. Sort of smash up of elements between My Real Children and The Just City. Kept my interest until 3/4 in and then I felt the pages of dialog didn’t keep the plot moving as well. Still it’s Jo Walton and always thoughtful.

  • Jo Walton

    I think it's pretty good, but it's hard for me to judge.

    Here's a link to some illustrations.

    Also, I LOVE the cover. I don't know what I did recently to get so lucky with covers, but this one is fabulous.

  • Sherwood Smith

    Though this book is written within the framework of Roman Catholicism of the 1400-1500s, it is not a Catholic book. It is a book celebrating Renaissance humanism.

    A quick note laying down my understanding here.

    Renaissance Humanism was not a philosophy. It was a cultural phenomenon flowering around the rediscovery of the classics. It was not antithetical to Christianity as it was developed, and celebrated, within the vast and lapidary complexity of Christian theology and my

    Though this book is written within the framework of Roman Catholicism of the 1400-1500s, it is not a Catholic book. It is a book celebrating Renaissance humanism.

    A quick note laying down my understanding here.

    Renaissance Humanism was not a philosophy. It was a cultural phenomenon flowering around the rediscovery of the classics. It was not antithetical to Christianity as it was developed, and celebrated, within the vast and lapidary complexity of Christian theology and mythology, but as far as I understand it (not being a Renaissance or a medieval scholar), it shifted the focus from the study of the next world to the study of this world, with man at the center. Studying—delighting in—things human, in particular good speaking, good writing, and above all, art, was acceptable because God had created humans in his own image.

    We slide into that paradigm at the very start, when Girolamo Savonarola casts out demons. Even though not everybody sees demons, he does. He sees those demons, he casts them out, sending them straight back to Hell.

    Which is a real place.

    I’m not going to say anything more about the story, because this is one that is so much better experienced without any knowledge of what lies ahead. What I will say is that the exquisite, amazing, and often strange city of Florence is beautifully evoked here, where remarkable personalities lived, made art, debated. And died, sometimes terribly, because passion’s dark side is violence.

    But it’s not a bleak book. Jo Walton writes so joyfully about humanism—people being the best selves they can be—in all her books.

    I found that viewpoint especially breathtaking in this intense, vivid, transcendent book, leaving me in the good kind of tears at the end.

Best Books Online is in no way intended to support illegal activity. Use it at your risk. We uses Search API to find books/manuals but doesn´t host any files. All document files are the property of their respective owners. Please respect the publisher and the author for their copyrighted creations. If you find documents that should not be here please report them


©2019 Best Books Online - All rights reserved.