Mrs. Everything

Mrs. Everything

From Jennifer Weiner, the #1 New York Times bestselling author of Who Do You Love and In Her Shoes, comes a smart, thoughtful, and timely exploration of two sisters’ lives from the 1950s to the present as they struggle to find their places—and be true to themselves—in a rapidly evolving world. Mrs. Everything is an ambitious, richly textured journey through history—and her...

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Title:Mrs. Everything
Author:Jennifer Weiner
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Edition Language:English

Mrs. Everything Reviews

  • Berit☀️✨

    This book was EVERYTHING! So powerful, so emotional, so beautiful, so absorbing. I was completely invested from page 1 in these character’s lives, I did not want the book to end. This book spans five decades as we watch sisters Jo and Bethie figure themselves and the world out. From Detroit to Atlanta, from the 50s to the 2000s we watch these sisters and those they love navigate their way through this thing we call life. We see them succeed and fail, grow and stumble, love and lose, laugh and cr

    This book was EVERYTHING! So powerful, so emotional, so beautiful, so absorbing. I was completely invested from page 1 in these character’s lives, I did not want the book to end. This book spans five decades as we watch sisters Jo and Bethie figure themselves and the world out. From Detroit to Atlanta, from the 50s to the 2000s we watch these sisters and those they love navigate their way through this thing we call life. We see them succeed and fail, grow and stumble, love and lose, laugh and cry. Jennifer Weiner evoked every possible emotion in me with her words. I laughed, I cried, I smiled, and I shook my head. Life is hard and it is complicated. Neither Jo or Bethie had it easy, but they fought and loved their way to their best lives. This was an unforgettable book that left me with a smile on my face and a tear in my eye.

    I wrote the above last night and I was going to add to it today, but I don’t think I need to. But I will say this being pride month I think this book really did a wonderful job with Jo’s struggle to truly accept herself. Of course this became easier as the country became more tolerant, but still can you imagine having to repress your true self for years and years and years? And I’m sure this was much more common than we know. I hope that one day everyone will be accepting of who people choose to love. This book really brought home how far we have come, but we still have so far to go. OK I will stop preaching! Just do yourself a favor pick this book up and read it, it is quite fabulous!

    *** Big thanks to Atria for my copy of this book ***

  • Jennifer ~ TarHeelReader

    ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐

    Jennifer Weiner…I’ve been reading her books for close to twenty years. I first read Little Earthquakes, but it was In Her Shoes that I fell for most and had to read all of her backlist. And that movie? Loved it!

    In my mind, Jennifer Weiner gets better and better, and this book? Mrs. Everything? It’s right at the pinnacle, tippy-top of what she’s accomplished! And that said? I’m already ready for her

    ⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️

    Jennifer Weiner…I’ve been reading her books for close to twenty years. I first read Little Earthquakes, but it was In Her Shoes that I fell for most and had to read all of her backlist. And that movie? Loved it!

    In my mind, Jennifer Weiner gets better and better, and this book? Mrs. Everything? It’s right at the pinnacle, tippy-top of what she’s accomplished! And that said? I’m already ready for her top herself next time because I know she can.

    Regardless of me already dreaming of her next book, Mrs. Everything is an enormous treasure of a read. It’s technically historical fiction, taking place in 1950s Detroit. Two sisters with differing personalities grow up in the same family and experience many of the same traumas and unique family dynamics only to have vastly different experiences (isn’t that the way so often with families?).

    Bethie and Jo’s personalities could not be more different. Jo, the older sister, lives her early life without abandon while Bethie plays it safe with paper dolls. Then, later, they switch roles, and Bethie becomes the wild child during the 60s, while Jo takes the safer route to a traditional life in Connecticut as a young mom. Neither sister is happy, and each is seeking the happy life.

    The storytelling in Mrs. Everything is so rich, so all enveloping, it’s like a warm hug when you fall into this story of these two sisters. There’s some darkness here, too, and traumas these sisters live through. The way it’s written with honesty makes it all so relatable.

    Mrs. Everything is epic in proportions, too, as it follows Bethie and Jo throughout their lives. Everything they experience is something any reader could have experienced. I can’t stress enough how innately human these characters are.

    Mrs. Everything accomplishes much more than the average book. It felt me feeling affirmed and hopeful. In other words, it left me feeling understood.

    Thank you, Jennifer Weiner, for this masterfully drawn warm hug (and a big high five, too).

    I received a complimentary copy. All opinions are my own.

    My reviews can also be found on my blog:

  • Debra

    3.5 stars

    Mrs. Everything is the story of two sister's lives from the 1950's to the present day. The book showcases the sister's different personalities, their similarities, their struggles, how they both changed over time, how they responded to their mother, how they responded to each other, how they came together, what drove them apart, their loved ones and their hopes and dreams. This is their journey through the times in which they lived, through their family, through their individual experie

    3.5 stars

    Mrs. Everything is the story of two sister's lives from the 1950's to the present day. The book showcases the sister's different personalities, their similarities, their struggles, how they both changed over time, how they responded to their mother, how they responded to each other, how they came together, what drove them apart, their loved ones and their hopes and dreams. This is their journey through the times in which they lived, through their family, through their individual experiences and how those experiences shaped their lives.

    Fans of Jennifer Weiner will not be disappointed. I have read many of her books and enjoyed this one as well. It had me thinking of my relationship with my sister, who is also my only sibling. We had different roles in our family, each other's lives and the paths we have taken.

    I thought this book could have done with some editing but overall found it to be thought provoking, relate-able, insightful and moving.

    Thank you to Atria books and NetGalley who provided me with an ARC in exchange for an honest review. All the thoughts and opinions are my own.

  • Melissa

    is just that—she’s

    and

    woman. She’s the collective voice of you, me, our mothers, grandmothers, aunts, sisters, friends, neighbors and acquaintances. She’s the gamut of emotions, triumphs, sacrifices, and heartbreak that feed into the way we view the world. She’s a piece of fiction that hits home with the notion that

    for each one of us.

    In a story that spans gener

    is just that—she’s

    and

    woman. She’s the collective voice of you, me, our mothers, grandmothers, aunts, sisters, friends, neighbors and acquaintances. She’s the gamut of emotions, triumphs, sacrifices, and heartbreak that feed into the way we view the world. She’s a piece of fiction that hits home with the notion that

    for each one of us.

    In a story that spans generations,

    taps into the heart of life. From the expectations we set for ourselves to the varying degrees of reality that often take shape instead.

    On the longer side, this novel follows two sisters—Jo and Bethie—for the entirety of their existence. From childhood to the trying times of adolescence and the woes of adulthood, their dueling storylines bring forth topics likely to resonate with women from all backgrounds. The beauty of the extensive timeline is witnessing the influence of an ever-changing society on the hopes and dreams of the two sisters.

    is an author that hits the high notes when it comes to relatability. From the characters she presents on the page, to the topics that formulate, her words speak the language of everyday women. Chances are, we’ve all faced challenges similar to Jo and Bethie or know someone who has.

    There are those times when we read to breathe in a different life than our own. And others when we seek out novels like

    , an experience that offers a sense of solidarity and sisterhood.

  • Debbie

    What a great surprise! I thought I was signing up for some nice-and-light chick lit, but oh, was I ever wrong! We follow two sisters, Jo and Bethie, from childhood to seniorhood. Their lives are anything but nice and light, and I got pulled in immediately. There’s drama coming out their ears, yet it’s not gratuitious, overdone, or unrealistic. Weiner, who I’ve always thought was a good writer but definitely on the light side, created a more s

    What a great surprise! I thought I was signing up for some nice-and-light chick lit, but oh, was I ever wrong! We follow two sisters, Jo and Bethie, from childhood to seniorhood. Their lives are anything but nice and light, and I got pulled in immediately. There’s drama coming out their ears, yet it’s not gratuitious, overdone, or unrealistic. Weiner, who I’ve always thought was a good writer but definitely on the light side, created a more serious and expansive story here (which was her plan, as she says in the Intro). Her storytelling chops are on full display. The plot is well paced and nearly flawless. And it’s juicily unpredictable; I loved having no idea what was going to happen next and getting slapped in the face with some dramatic, unexpected turn of events. The characters are complex and vivid, and they pressed my emote button. I even cried once!—and I’m not a crying kind of reader. Although the language isn’t jazzy, I liked how clear and smooth it is—not pretentious or convoluted. And her descriptions, they’re something else!

    Women baby boomers, you MUST read this book! Down memory lane we go! And if you were in the counter-culture (especially if were wild and crazy), you will really get your mind blown. Weiner has the 1960s and 1970s down pat; I was transported! Remember putting your pajamas under the pillow when you made the bed? Remember the deep pink indentations that your garter do-hickies made on your thighs? Does Metrecal ring a bell? All these images (and hundreds more) from a long-ago past are apparently stored on the hard drive inside my skull, and it was a kick to make them dance. I had no idea they were still up there in the old noggin’, just waiting to be reactivated!

    And of course, the images stirred up memories and that was when I’d daydream for a bit, taking little side trips of my own. (Maybe some of our senior ADD happens because we get distracted by our memories?) Weiner really did her homework; she’s not a baby boomer herself. You’d think she was, based on how well she understands that time period. I’m betting her mom was the key source, as Weiner mentions her in the Intro and it seems that the story is loosely based on her life.

    So yes, the descriptions are out of this world. I usually whine relentlessly about writers’ detail-itis, but here, I’m not poo-pahing it one bit. I was glued to the page. I couldn’t take my eyes off any of it—the clothes, the rooms, the colors, all the spot-on pop-culture references. Weiner is one of those excellent writers who makes you feel like you’re watching a movie. Usually, a writer talking about the color of bellbottoms would annoy the hell out of me. Here, I appreciated being able to see the movie in technicolor. (I’d love it if they took this story to the big screen. They’ve made one of Weiner’s books, In Her Shoes, into a blockbuster movie, so maybe it will happen again.)

    So it was the first third of the book, where Jo and Bethie were kids and teens in the 60s and 70s, that made me crazy happy. I was hopping around on my pogo stick while wearing my bellbottoms and holding a transistor radio blasting the Beatles’ “We All Live in a Yellow Submarine.” (Pretty impressive that I can hold a radio while hopping on the pogo stick, huh?) I couldn’t stop talking about the book; it was magical. I give that part of the book 10 stars, hands down.

    Don’t’ worry, I’m not saying that the rest of the book was bigtime inferior; it just wasn’t as intense, and I didn’t have the memory game going so much. I still loved it.

    But there was one thing that kept me from giving the book 5 stars, and it’s that the women’s lib part was too pushy. I don’t think the book needs an agenda. Sexual abuse was a topic, and Weiner handled those scenes expertly—and they got my dander up like they were supposed to. But there was a consciousness-raising scene in the early part of the book that I found embarrassing—way too cliched. I know Weiner was going for authentic, and authentic it was (women really did attend official consciousness-raising meetings). I just was bored and annoyed reading it. She could have left out the dialogue, which in its rhetoric seemed sophomoric. Later in the book, there’s more sexual politics, and it felt a little male-bashy—not terribly so, but I didn’t like it.

    It was so exciting to take this long journey with the two sisters and to watch their internal turmoil. I liked how realistic the book was, and I enjoyed their complex and intense relationship. Some of their choices made me cringe, others made me sad—oh please don’t do THAT! Do you really think that’s a good idea? Don’t you see you’re messing up?! Only a great writer can make me get so wound up about characters in a book! They’re not real people, Debbie, take it easy! She also made me shut my mouth and not rail against angsty teens. You won’t hear a peep from me this time, even though there was ample angst. Maybe it’s because she made Jo and Bethie so likeable. And their angst seemed so real and justified and understandable.

    There’s probably something in the book that every female can relate to—I found several things, including living with a hyper-critical mom. And of course, I identified with some of the unsavory choices made during the hippie days. And the kind of bizarro scenes that you’re thrown into, and which catch you off guard and leave you speechless and sometimes traumatized. There was at least one harrowing scene that had me by the throat and will stay with me a long time. It reminded me of the trouble you can get in when you make bad decisions in your early 20s (before your prefrontal cortex is fully developed).

    There were a couple of super minor things that should have been resolved and a couple things that didn’t ring true. (For example, a character paid their bills when they went bankrupt, even though bankruptcy means you don’t have to pay your bills.) Oh, and I ran across a joke that I recently heard Jay Leno make! The writer should have referenced it as a public joke; instead, I felt Weiner was trying to pass it off as an original funny. But we’re talking picky picky picky here. This was one satisfying read.

    I’m surprised that this book isn’t touted as an LGBT book, as Jo is gay. The beginning of the book chronicles her trying to come to terms with her budding sexuality; it was so well done and very intense. I really got a feel for how insanely difficult being a lesbian in the 60s and 70s would have been.

    Also depicted: life in a Jewish family, sexual abuse (and its aftermath), weight issues, drugs, the good and bad of the free-love days. It made me think about the death of dreams, what people want versus what they settle for, the wandering lost souls of the young, the price of bad decisions, the loss of innocence, longing, discontent, internal conflicts.

    What a book! I’m still reeling and it has been a while since I finished it. Definitely a favorite book of 2019! Grab it when it is published in June.

    Thanks to NetGalley for the advanced copy.

  • Chelsea Humphrey

    For me, this was a 3 star read with a 5 star message, so I went with a 4 star rating. It's the type of book that you want to say so much about and also nothing at all. You want to say so much, because it's a very timely message and is being published at the most opportune moment. In a world in the midst of the #metoo movement and feminism on the rise, it's the type of book that women can rally behind and promo

    For me, this was a 3 star read with a 5 star message, so I went with a 4 star rating. It's the type of book that you want to say so much about and also nothing at all. You want to say so much, because it's a very timely message and is being published at the most opportune moment. In a world in the midst of the #metoo movement and feminism on the rise, it's the type of book that women can rally behind and promote with ease. It's also a book that I'm struggling to talk about, because it's an epic, sweeping saga of sisters, mothers, and daughters, and to divulge any details would be to take away from your own reading experience.

    In the forward of my arc, Jennifer Weiner writes a preface that describes where the inspiration for this story came from. Her own mother was born in the 1940's, married a man and had children, divorced him and ended up falling in love with a woman. I think the vulnerability and raw appeal to this novel is the fact that it covers a lifetime, not just a year or two, and the choice to delve into something deeper and a little more serious was an excellent choice for the author. You'll laugh, you'll cry, but you won't forget

    after you finish it. Highly recommended for those looking for a relevant historical fiction that expresses the journey of what it means to be female, past and present.

  • Meredith

    Spanning decades and told through the alternating narrative of two sisters, Jo and Bethie, who grew up in Detroit in the 1950s, Weiner explores the complex relationship between women, while at the same time, ex

    Spanning decades and told through the alternating narrative of two sisters, Jo and Bethie, who grew up in Detroit in the 1950s, Weiner explores the complex relationship between women, while at the same time, examining and subverting gender norms.

    tries to be everything: family saga, drama, women’s fiction, and a feminist manifesto. At times,

    struggles to find its place, but there is an ease about the narrative that draws the reader into Jo and Bethie’s lives. Both sisters’ stories are equally interesting. The lengthy timeline allows the reader to watch Jo and Bethie struggle with finding fulfillment. It’s a long journey towards self-acceptance.

    I received an ARC of this book from NetGalley and Atria Books in exchange for an honest review.

  • Susanne  Strong

    Jo and Bethie are sisters and “Mrs. Everything” is their story. It takes place over the course of decades. There are trials and tribulations as each woman struggles and tries to be everything to everyone, including each other. As sisters, the re

    Jo and Bethie are sisters and “Mrs. Everything” is their story. It takes place over the course of decades. There are trials and tribulations as each woman struggles and tries to be everything to everyone, including each other. As sisters, the relationship between Jo and Bethie is real and true. When experiencing hardship, the pain Jo and Bethie feel is palpable, as is their joy. There were times when I raised my fist in a “yes, you go girl” moment and times when my eyes were filling with tears and I just cried my little heart out.

    As someone whose only sibling is a sister, this story resonated with me. My sister and I are four years apart and are very different, thus we were treated very differently by our parents, just like Jo and Bethie. Though I am the younger sister, I resonated with certain parts of Jo, the tomboy, the girl who loves jeans and who is hard working, no nonsense and serious. I am equally sure that my sister would relate to Bethie, beautiful, popular and successful. I will be sure to send my sister a copy of this book upon its release to find out for sure!

    That’s the thing: “Mrs. Everything” is relatable to everyone, especially here and now - with what is going on these days.

    I very much enjoyed reading this novel as I loved the story of Jo and Bethie. “Mrs. Everything” is on the longer side and is therefore a slower read, thus it is one to be savored. This is now the third book that I’ve read by Jennifer Weiner and it is my favorite by far!

    Thank you to Ariele Friedman at Atria Books for an arc of this novel in exchange for an honest review.

    Published on NetGalley and Goodreads on 5.26.19.

    Will be published on Amazon and Twitter on 6.11.19

  • Larry H

    Josette (Jo) and Elisabeth (Bethie) Kaufman were sisters who came of age in 1950s Detroit. Jo is a tomboy, more comfortable in old clothes and running around playing sports, while young Bethie was content with being the pretty, talented one, the center of attention. Not much changed as the two approached their teenage years, much to their mother's chagrin. Jo became more outspoken in trying to understand civil rights and social justice, while Bethie starts understanding that her beauty gives her

    Josette (Jo) and Elisabeth (Bethie) Kaufman were sisters who came of age in 1950s Detroit. Jo is a tomboy, more comfortable in old clothes and running around playing sports, while young Bethie was content with being the pretty, talented one, the center of attention. Not much changed as the two approached their teenage years, much to their mother's chagrin. Jo became more outspoken in trying to understand civil rights and social justice, while Bethie starts understanding that her beauty gives her an interesting form of power.

    But a family tragedy leads to a traumatic incident for one sister and self-discovery for the other, and both impact their lives and their relationships. As time moves on, Bethie becomes a free spirit, traveling the world, never putting roots down in one place, immersing herself in the counterculture and embracing the idea that women should have whatever they want. Jo, on the other hand, becomes a traditional housewife in Connecticut, raising two daughters and wondering how she wound up living the life she is. Both are content in their own ways but aren't truly happy, but at the same time, aren't sure they are willing to shake things up enough to make change happen.

    follows Jo and Bethie to the present day, chronicling the journey of these two women as they struggle for happiness, love, and fulfillment, even when they believe they can't have all three simultaneously. They have triumphs and deal with tragedies, they turn toward each other and turn away, and try to be true to themselves and who they are. It's a novel that has an almost epic feel to it.

    "'We lose ourselves,' she repeated, forming each word with care, 'but we find our way back.' Wasn't that the story of her life? Wasn't that the story of Bethie's? You make the wrong choices, you make mistakes, you disappear for a decade, you marry the wrong man. You get hurt. You lose sight of who you are, or of who you want to be, and then you remember, and if you're lucky you have sisters or friends who remind you when you forget your best intentions. You come back to yourself, again and again. You try, and fail, and try again, and fail again."

    I've never read anything that Jennifer Weiner has written, so when I was offered the opportunity to read

    I jumped at it. Weiner says in a note that appears at the start of my advance copy that she was inspired by Michael Cunningham's

    and Susan Isaacs'

    (two books I loved) to write a book that followed its main characters all the way through their lives. She also said she wanted to write about a character like her mother, whose life moved in unexpected and unbelievable ways.

    The arcs that Weiner's characters' lives follow are very believable. These are women whose stories have been told so many times yet they need to be told many times more. This is a fascinating exploration of the roles women play within their families, within their marriages and relationships, and within society. There isn't necessarily anything surprising in this book but that doesn't matter; it's still a powerful book with strong messages.

    I really enjoyed the way Weiner writes and felt completely immersed in the story. I felt like things dragged a bit at times, but real life isn't always exciting either. I do read a fair amount of so-called "women's fiction," but this is one book that I'd imagine will resonate more with women than it did with me, although I still felt moved by it.

    NetGalley and Atria Books provided me an advance copy of this book in exchange for an unbiased review. Thanks for making it available!

    This book will be published June 11, 2019.

    See all of my reviews at

    .

    Check out my list of the best books I read in 2018 at

    .

    You can follow me on Instagram at

  • Norma * Traveling Sister

    Emotive, all-embracing, & a sweeping saga!

    MRS. EVERYTHING by JENNIFER WEINER is a timely, rich, emotional, gripping, and thought-provoking saga that spans decades between two sisters, Jo and Bethie. We get an intimate look into each of these character’s lives as we follow along their story. MRS. EVERYTHING gives us a realistic and true to life story about women that well deals with everything. This was definitely an eye-opening reading experience for me as it delves deep into their everyday

    Emotive, all-embracing, & a sweeping saga!

    MRS. EVERYTHING by JENNIFER WEINER is a timely, rich, emotional, gripping, and thought-provoking saga that spans decades between two sisters, Jo and Bethie. We get an intimate look into each of these character’s lives as we follow along their story. MRS. EVERYTHING gives us a realistic and true to life story about women that well deals with everything. This was definitely an eye-opening reading experience for me as it delves deep into their everyday struggles as well as giving a voice to all women in a much broader stance.

    JENNIFER WEINER delivers an interesting, engaging and beautifully written story here that was easily one of the most important, entertaining, and memorable books that I will ever read. This being my very first JENNIFER WEINER novel I was thoroughly impressed with how easily she was able to instill such an important message in her storytelling. I felt that the novel at times was quite deep but so worth spending the time with these two sisters. It was definitely a heartfelt story that was so heartwarming and felt perfectly complete in the end.

    Norma’s Stats:

    Cover: I love the look and feel to this cover and think that it is such a bold, striking, meaningful and fitting representation to storyline.

    Title: Intriguing, thought-provoking, relevant, and a fabulous representation to storyline.

    Writing/Prose: Engaging, effective, effortless, readable, beautiful, and well-written.

    Plot: Steadily-paced, relatable, interesting, thought-provoking, touching, hopeful, heartfelt and powerful.

    Ending: An impactful and bittersweet ending that moved me and left me feeling that I read something really special here.

    Overall: This was not a quick and easy book for me to read as it was quite deep, emotional, and raw. It is one to savour! Would recommend!

    Thank you so much to Simon & Schuster Canada and Jennifer Weiner for my complimentary copy.

    Review can also be found on our Two Sisters Lost in a Coulee Reading book blog:

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