Ordinary Girls

Ordinary Girls

Perfect for fans of Jenny Han and Sarah Mlynowski, this heartfelt and humorous contemporary take on Sense and Sensibility follows two sisters—complete opposites—who discover the secrets they’ve been keeping make them more alike than they’d realized.For two sisters as different as Plum and Ginny, getting on each other’s nerves is par for the course. But when the family’s fi...

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Title:Ordinary Girls
Author:Blair Thornburgh
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Ordinary Girls Reviews

  • Melissa

    ONE OF MY FAVORITE BOOKS. It's amazing. And I could spout out a soliloquy about how wonderfully smart and fantastic and important it is, but you should just read it for yourself.

    It's a quiet, warm, poignant story about the complex and emotional bond between sisters, with a hint of tragedy and romance. Upon finishing the story, expect to feel utterly content and complete.

  • Samantha (WLABB)

    From the opening, where Plum lamented how she had never been good at beginnings, I found myself totally engrossed with her storytelling and this tale. There was something about Plum's voice, that made me want to get to know her better, and I could not the resist the charm and allure of her quirky world.

    This was a tale of two sisters - one very dramatic, the other quite pragmatic. They had their ups and downs with each other, but their relationship was the heart and soul of the story for me.

    I ado

    From the opening, where Plum lamented how she had never been good at beginnings, I found myself totally engrossed with her storytelling and this tale. There was something about Plum's voice, that made me want to get to know her better, and I could not the resist the charm and allure of her quirky world.

    This was a tale of two sisters - one very dramatic, the other quite pragmatic. They had their ups and downs with each other, but their relationship was the heart and soul of the story for me.

    I adore the exploration of the sibling bond, and this one was indeed, very special. Plum had always felt overshadowed by her sister. She thought Ginny was more attractive, popular, intelligent, and likable, and she was often tired of being compared to her sister. However, via flashbacks and tender and humorous interactions between the two in the present, I got to bask in the beauty of their sisterly love. I had so much fun at their movie nights, and greatly enjoyed their shared love of Romantic period literature. Yes, literary references abound in this novel, and they were so well placed, never failing to delight me.

    During the time of this story, the family was under more stress than usual. The house was falling apart, cash flow was becoming an issue, and Ginny was often in a state of hysteria involving her college plans. Plum found an escape from the chaos via the oddest source - Tate Kurokawa, one of the "loud sophomore boys" she usually tried to avoid. Their odd friendship was one of the most precious parts of the book for me. I wore a stupid grin on my face almost every single time they shared the page, and could not get enough of their sweet and awkward encounters.

    One of the biggest things plaguing this family was their grief. They had lost their father a decade ago, but still hadn't really come to terms with that loss. This pain of it ran deep and it festered within the family, finally coming to a fever pitch at one point during the book. It was quite a profound moment, and I found it very moving.

    Ordinary Girls was a delightful tale filled with interesting family dynamics, sisterly affection, first love, and two young women finding their own sense of self. It was charming, witty, amusing, heartwarming, heartbreaking, and throughly entertaining.

    *ARC provided in exchange for an honest review.

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  • Rachel Strolle

    I really liked this. It was like little vignettes within larger acts and very different from WHO'S THAT GIRL

  • Kate Brauning

    This book is so "sisters" it had me calling mine to tell them how annoying/wonderful they are. It's hilarious and genuine, perfect for fans of old movies, weird families, and creaky beautiful houses. Go get it, you can thank me later.

  • Rachel Penny

    4.5 stars!!

  • Tasha

    Plum could not be more different than her excitable sister, Ginny. Ginny has a group of friends at their private school, while Plum doesn’t have any at all. She’d much prefer to do advance reading for her classes than engage with others her age. Ginny is about to graduate from high school and longs to get accepted into her university of choice, but it’s not that simple. First, she has to be accepted and then she needs enough financial aid to attend. While they may live in a large home, it’s fill

    Plum could not be more different than her excitable sister, Ginny. Ginny has a group of friends at their private school, while Plum doesn’t have any at all. She’d much prefer to do advance reading for her classes than engage with others her age. Ginny is about to graduate from high school and longs to get accepted into her university of choice, but it’s not that simple. First, she has to be accepted and then she needs enough financial aid to attend. While they may live in a large home, it’s filled with clutter and day-to-day life rather than being a show piece. Feeling more and more distant from her ever-more-agitated sister, Plum finds herself in a position to help, but only because of a secret romance. Now Plum has her own life, but it may take her away from her family right when they need her.

    This is a contemporary tale with a classic heart. Riffing on Sense and Sensibility, this novel for teens takes one rather old-fashioned young lady and her sister who is her opposite and flings at them the trials of modern life. There are the costs of living when their mother loses her royalty payments, the grueling college application and financial aid process, bullying, and of course, kissing too. It’s a book that offers two great female characters. Plum is introverted, wildly funny and wise. Ginny is anxiety-ridden, loud, dramatic and loving. The two together make an ideal look at sisterhood.

    Thornburgh writes with a specific style here. It even more tightly ties the story to classic literature and also reveals Plum’s thoughts and her own way of thinking. The story never drags, instead it is filled with drama and disasters large and small. The writing is a delightful mix of classic and modern with plenty of humor too.

    A deep look at sisterhood that is funny and rich. Appropriate for ages 12-15.

  • Kalie

    The characters in a Blair Thornburgh novel feel as if they’ve escaped from an episode of

    and that should annoy me. It really should. However, as with her last book,

    , I found

    inherently charming and brimming with so much heart that any initial annoyance I felt disappeared early on. It’s occasionally over-the-top and melodramatic as any loose retelling of an Austen classic can be, but it’s near impossible to not be immediately invested in the plights of

    The characters in a Blair Thornburgh novel feel as if they’ve escaped from an episode of

    and that should annoy me. It really should. However, as with her last book,

    , I found

    inherently charming and brimming with so much heart that any initial annoyance I felt disappeared early on. It’s occasionally over-the-top and melodramatic as any loose retelling of an Austen classic can be, but it’s near impossible to not be immediately invested in the plights of Plum and Ginny. It’s a book that takes unabashed pleasure in its own love of literature. If you’re in the mood for a little hyperbole, literary references in abundance, and a sister dynamic that’s both loving and exasperating, then

    ought to be on your list.

    For me personally, I enjoyed her previous novel just a bit more (it was more inclusive and hit more of my sweet spots), but Thornburgh is fast becoming one of my favorite contemporary voices in YA who definitely deserves more notice.

  • Sami

    With shades of Sense & Sensibility, Jane Eyre, and Little Women, this book feels just as familiar and friendly as falling into an old classic. Introverted Plum and dramatic Ginny hit all the strides of a stereotypical sister relationship, but Ordinary Girls follows it through and turns it into a discussion about mental health that I found totally necessary and refreshing.

  • Jennifer

    Review to come.

  • Christina (A Reader of Fictions)

    Thornburgh's writing just isn't for me, running heavily on quirk and very literary. I also wanted this to be a retelling, when it's more inspired by based on the opening. Also, another very personal pet peeve: the chapters are SO LONG.

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