Lima :: Limón

Lima :: Limón

In her striking second collection, Natalie Scenters-Zapico sets her unflinching gaze once again on the borders of things. Lima :: Limón illuminates both the sweet and the sour of the immigrant experience, of life as a woman in the U.S. and Mexico, and of the politics of the present day. Drawing inspiration from the music of her childhood, her lyrical poems focus on the oft...

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Title:Lima :: Limón
Author:Natalie Scenters-Zapico
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Edition Language:English

Lima :: Limón Reviews

  • Jimena Lucero

    Blown away by Natalie Scenters-Zapico’s use of words and images. She writes with such brutal, daring, and tender honesty. I am going to revisit this collection as much as I revisit her first collection.

    Excerpt from poem “You Are a Dark Body”

    “ A man / lies down in bed next to you. He swallows your dark body / of water & gives you a woman’s body, a body you’ve never known ./ As a woman, you receive sores from him & through/ the sores you breaths & despite the sores you give birth / t

    Blown away by Natalie Scenters-Zapico’s use of words and images. She writes with such brutal, daring, and tender honesty. I am going to revisit this collection as much as I revisit her first collection.

    Excerpt from poem “You Are a Dark Body”

    “ A man / lies down in bed next to you. He swallows your dark body / of water & gives you a woman’s body, a body you’ve never known ./ As a woman, you receive sores from him & through/ the sores you breaths & despite the sores you give birth / to a child still born for lack of water.

    This book reads incredibly well. All of these poems feel like they are in conversation with each other. It especially made me think of the dynamic between men and women in Latinx/ Mexican culture. I think a lot of the poems question, study, and witness that dynamic through very many different characters, scenarios, and history/ current events.

    I can write more!!!! BUT JUST BUY THIS BOOK AND SUPPORT HER WORK. It is important & will always be. I want to buy this book for all the women/ femmes in my life who have survived violence.

  • Emily Polson

    I think I need to sit with this for a while before I write a review, but wow. This was excellent.

    [I received a review copy from the publisher via Edelweiss.]

  • Adriana Martinez Figueroa

    i need to like. lay down for a while. goddamn.

    --

    In an exploration of womanhood, and the ugliness that exists within that concept, Natalie Scenters-Zapico delivers a collection that is at once defiant and real. The sophomore poet explores not just womanhood, but the binary in which girls and women reside in, never allowed to live in the area between girlhood and womanhood.

    The author’s usage of nursery rhymes brings back memories of childhood games and the notion of innocence, defying the expectat

    i need to like. lay down for a while. goddamn.

    --

    In an exploration of womanhood, and the ugliness that exists within that concept, Natalie Scenters-Zapico delivers a collection that is at once defiant and real. The sophomore poet explores not just womanhood, but the binary in which girls and women reside in, never allowed to live in the area between girlhood and womanhood.

    The author’s usage of nursery rhymes brings back memories of childhood games and the notion of innocence, defying the expectation that only men are allowed introspection into their childhoods; only they are allowed to rely on their immaturity to go through life. Scenters-Zapico points out there is no space for a girl to experience innocence, what with how we’re continuously sexualized from the moment we’re born until after death. All of our innocence is squeezed out of us like citrus, like limes and lemons, in order to quench a man’s thirst. Women, in this collection, are wrung out and laid out to dry in this machista world.

    Scenters-Zapico’s words force you to look at gendered violence in the same way immigrant women, particularly poor, undocumented Latinas, are subjected to various forms of it. There is gendered violence around us from the moment we’re born, and we’re gaslit with the notion that men do violence as a way to show their women, or hembras, their love. We’re brought up a violent manipulation of the concept love, and this collection is full of examples of it.

    This book is more a gallery of la indignación that follows heartbreak, because how dare anyone take the feelings and trust that you’ve freely given them and consequently put you through hell. It’s la indignación in the face of the fetishization of pain and trauma, be they personal or generational. And it’s indignación done with respect toward the subjects without objectifying them. It doesn’t glorify but humanize, all while tackling subjects like miscarriage, domestic violence, and sexual assault. It’s not written for the white gaze just as it isn’t for the male gaze.

    is a book I’ll return to and do close readings of because there’s so much meaning put into the words that you can’t read it in a superficial way. Scenters-Zapico’s words burrow themselves into your soul and you can’t help but sit with them uncomfortably until you make yourself feel comfortable. Let Natalie Scenters-Zapico enter the poetry canon forever.

    graphic depiction of domestic abuse (mostly throughout the Macho :: Hembra sections), sexual assault, miscarriage, pedophilia, gendered violence, racism, white supremacist quotes (there are direct quotes said by Trump in “Notes on My Present: A Contrapuntal”), seizure, blood, wounds, femicide

  • Emily Pérez

    My review is here:

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