The Last Love Poem I Will Ever Write: Poems

The Last Love Poem I Will Ever Write: Poems

In this moving, playful, and deeply philosophical volume, Gregory Orr seeks innovative ways for the imagination to respond to and create meaning out of painful experiences, while at the same time rejoicing in love and language. A passionate exploration of the forces that shape us, The Last Love Poem I Will Ever Write explores themes of survival and the powerlessness of the...

DownloadRead Online
Title:The Last Love Poem I Will Ever Write: Poems
Author:Gregory Orr
Rating:

The Last Love Poem I Will Ever Write: Poems Reviews

  • John

    Gregory Orr remains a lyric poet of measured syntax and the deepest rooted imagery (as the poet Stanley Kunitz once wrote about Orr). There is clarity and precision in the use of words in his poems. Words are not wasted. Care is taken. They tell.

    I think this is Orr’s strongest work since The Red House and City of Salt. I found the title of this book sadly evocative, but the poem itself with that title is pretty good, along with several poems in tribute to other poets.

    By some accounts, Orr does

    Gregory Orr remains a lyric poet of measured syntax and the deepest rooted imagery (as the poet Stanley Kunitz once wrote about Orr). There is clarity and precision in the use of words in his poems. Words are not wasted. Care is taken. They tell.

    I think this is Orr’s strongest work since The Red House and City of Salt. I found the title of this book sadly evocative, but the poem itself with that title is pretty good, along with several poems in tribute to other poets.

    By some accounts, Orr does 200 drafts of a single poem. Rather than lazy free verse that too many poets today get away with, Orr is rigorous in writing mostly stellar and lyrical poems. A demanding poet is the one to spend time with.

  • Jeff

    Vindicating the Seventies period style, Orr's dimeter pursues idiomatic speed and gem-like slowness. It's a trope for the transcendent obsolescence of the damned, whose inspirational verse comes from an "Ode to Nothing": "Nothing stands between | The abyss and you. | Nothing keeps you | From falling off | The edge. |Nothing | Is that important."

  • Celinda

    A wonderful collection -- my favorite of his is still Concerning the Book that is the Body of the Beloved, but this was solid and filled with some real gems!

  • Jenna

    Orr is not afraid to dwell in sincerity and sentiment, to break his lines so that a single word isolated from its neighbors sits alone and ponderous, to get down in the muck with the big abstractions other poets shun. And this can be great. I didn't mind nodding along as Orr enthused about how relaxing on the grass is nice, but poems that end with epiphanies like "it's a dark and violent world" (the actual last words of one poem) did occasionally seem to verge on the banal and left me wanting a

    Orr is not afraid to dwell in sincerity and sentiment, to break his lines so that a single word isolated from its neighbors sits alone and ponderous, to get down in the muck with the big abstractions other poets shun. And this can be great. I didn't mind nodding along as Orr enthused about how relaxing on the grass is nice, but poems that end with epiphanies like "it's a dark and violent world" (the actual last words of one poem) did occasionally seem to verge on the banal and left me wanting a bit more. The two overtly topical poems ("I Don't Really Care, Do You?" and "Charlottesville Elegy"), in particular, left me craving more sharpness. The first-person speaker of this book says Emily Dickinson spoke to him in dreams and also cites Sappho as an influence, laxly paraphrasing the latter poet at length in "Lyric Revises the World" ("All around you, the guys / Jabbered on and on / About how awesome / Marching armies are..."), with the unintended result that sometimes I itched to stop reading this book and instead just reread Dickinson and Sappho with their matchless concision, taut grace, and originality of thought. Still, Orr does at times hit upon a line that is nicely pithy, e.g., when he says art's purpose is to turn "shadow into shade" or when he indicts sleazy politicians' excuse-making with these lines:

    A couple of the poems seem to continue beyond the point where they could just as well have stopped, but "To Hart Crane" effectively leans on silence and omission to work its magic, deliberately not mentioning what we all know about the circumstances of Crane's death to make a point about the death-defying ecstasy of Crane's poetry. And sure, there are some corny moments (in a poem about vowels: "And 'u'--who / Could ever forget you? // 'I' could never. / 'Y' would I even try?"), but these are balanced out by moments that are plain lovely, e.g., in "For My Mother," one of three poems in the book that ponders the poetic potential of mondegreens:

Best Books Online is in no way intended to support illegal activity. Use it at your risk. We uses Search API to find books/manuals but doesn´t host any files. All document files are the property of their respective owners. Please respect the publisher and the author for their copyrighted creations. If you find documents that should not be here please report them


©2019 Best Books Online - All rights reserved.