Natalie Tan's Book of Luck and Fortune

Natalie Tan's Book of Luck and Fortune

At the news of her mother's death, Natalie Tan returns home. The two women hadn't spoken since Natalie left in anger seven years ago, when her mother refused to support her chosen career as a chef. Natalie is shocked to discover the vibrant neighborhood of San Francisco's Chinatown that she remembers from her childhood is fading, with businesses failing and families moving...

DownloadRead Online
Title:Natalie Tan's Book of Luck and Fortune
Author:Roselle Lim
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Natalie Tan's Book of Luck and Fortune Reviews

  • Helen Hoang

    I absolutely loved this book. It's warm and bubbly and filled with magic, community, and great food. They need to make a movie of it, and you want to read it. And then watch it.

  • Susanne  Strong

    5 Lovely Stars!

    Natalie Tan returns home to Chinatown upon the loss of her mother to whom she had not spoken in seven years. Both had a falling out over Natalie’s chosen career - she wanted to be a chef like her Grandmother, Laolao. Upon returning home, she finds that Chinatown is no longer prospering as it once wa

    5 Lovely Stars!

    Natalie Tan returns home to Chinatown upon the loss of her mother to whom she had not spoken in seven years. Both had a falling out over Natalie’s chosen career - she wanted to be a chef like her Grandmother, Laolao. Upon returning home, she finds that Chinatown is no longer prospering as it once was when her Grandmother Laolao’s restaurant was running. When Natalie finds a letter from her Grandmother telling her to cook three recipes from her cookbook to help three people on their block, Natalie knows that this is how she will revitalize their neighborhood. Each recipe is filled with an intention, for peace, harmony, love and/ or luck. People come from near and far when they smell her recipes as Natalie cooks with love and from her heart and everyone notices.

    Nothing comes easily for Ms. Tan, but then nothing in life ever does. My favorite part of this novel were the recipes written. I fell in love with them and well, admittedly they made me a little hungry. (I don’t think I’m alone here when I say that, lol!).

    This was a fabulous buddy read with Kaceey! We both really liked this novel and I am so glad that we read it together.

    A HUGE thank you to Elisha at Berkley Publishing Group and to Roselle Lim for an arc of this novel in exchange for an honest review.

    Published on Goodreads and Amazon on 7.14.19.

    Excerpt posted on Instagram.

  • Kaceey

    Natalie Tan gets the call no one wants to receive. Her mother has just passed away in San Francisco. It’s time to go back. The trip made even more difficult given the strained relationship she’d always had with her mother. Natalie had taken a considerably different direction in life than what her mother had hoped for. Maybe Natalie will have a chance to heal old wounds and still follow

    Natalie Tan gets the call no one wants to receive. Her mother has just passed away in San Francisco. It’s time to go back. The trip made even more difficult given the strained relationship she’d always had with her mother. Natalie had taken a considerably different direction in life than what her mother had hoped for. Maybe Natalie will have a chance to heal old wounds and still follow her dreams at the same time.

    There are so many varying aspects to this book. There is of course, the mandatory romance💖

    But with Natalie’s love of cooking you’re left salivating over all the delicious delicacies she creates. So vivid in fact, at one point Susanne and I were both ready to call and place our orders at our favorite local take-outs! ⚠️ (Do not read this book on an empty stomach!!)

    Roselle Lim Has written a heartwarming, beautiful story that came together at the end in a way I never imagined. Touched so deeply, I cannot stop thinking about the ending. Bravo! Once again I was left in a puddle of tears.

    A fabulous buddy read with Susanne!

    Thank you to Elisha at Berkeley Publishing for an ARC to read and review.

  • Jennifer ~ TarHeelReader

    ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ 🌉

    Natalie Tan is a chef, though her mother never accepts the idea of that career. The two have been estranged for more than seven years when Natalie finds out her mom has passed away.

    When Natalie returns home to her beloved Chinatown in San Francisco, she finds it not as exciting and well-performing as it was in her youth. She also finds out she’s the beneficiary of her grandmother’s restaurant.

    Natalies visits the neighborhood seer who reads her tea leaves.

    ⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️ 🌉

    Natalie Tan is a chef, though her mother never accepts the idea of that career. The two have been estranged for more than seven years when Natalie finds out her mom has passed away.

    When Natalie returns home to her beloved Chinatown in San Francisco, she finds it not as exciting and well-performing as it was in her youth. She also finds out she’s the beneficiary of her grandmother’s restaurant.

    Natalies visits the neighborhood seer who reads her tea leaves. She says that Natalie must cook three recipes from her grandmother’s cookbook in order to help her neighbors, as well as the restaurant.

    Natalie has mixed feelings about helping these people who did not help her or her mother when she was growing up. Natalie makes a friend who opens her eyes to those same neighbors and maybe gives her a change of heart about them.

    Oh my goodness, what a fun, charming read. I loved the recipes included and the sweet romance. Food and cooking almost become characters in the story, and I love that. I also enjoyed all the cultural aspects included.

    Overall, Natalie Tan’s Book of Luck and Good Fortune is as cute, whimsical, and charming as its cover.

    I received a complimentary copy. All opinions are my own.

    My reviews can also be found on my blog:

  • Hamad

    🌟 There is something magical about books in the magic realism genre, I mean not literally because that would be obvious but I mean in my relationship with these books. The first book I read in this genre was a big NO for me, the same for the second when I decided the genre is just not for me and I won’t be reading more books in it. I read 3 books after that because I always realize

    🌟 There is something magical about books in the magic realism genre, I mean not literally because that would be obvious but I mean in my relationship with these books. The first book I read in this genre was a big NO for me, the same for the second when I decided the genre is just not for me and I won’t be reading more books in it. I read 3 books after that because I always realize that the book I am reading is MR later in the book and the publishers don’t market the books as such!

    Disclaimer: I received an ARC of this book from the publisher through Edelweiss in exchange of an honest review.

    🌟 This book is about Natalie Tan’s adventure to restore her grandma’s restaurant including all the challenges, secrets and relationships that she will face. It is a book about food, but much more than that!

    🌟 I liked Lim’s writing, she seems experienced and not an amateur, it didn’t feel like a debut for me and I am reading more adults books now which is a good thing because I am enjoying them more and more. The book has some recipes that I felt eager to go and try and it put me in the mood to make some food! It is not a cook book so you can just skim the preparation pages! Be ware that you shouldn’t read it while you are hungry though.

    🌟 The characters were good too, I liked Natalie’s character and how she was human, she had perseverance but she also had her bad moments, all of which made her realistic and not too perfect! The romance is kind of an insta-love but it is not central to the story so I could overlook that!

    🌟 The magic realism part did not add much and I think the book would have been better if it was realistic without magic, some of the magic is that the food she cooks can bring effects to those who eat it such as happiness and romance…etc. There is also another magical part but I will skip it because I am keeping this spoiler free.

    🌟 Summary: the book is well written and did not feel like a debut, it was not perfect but I think it is a very good book for those of us who appreciate food, there were magical elements that where un-necessary but an enjoyable experience all in all!

  • Jennifer

    Culture, family, romance, magic, and food. Oh, the food! Everything about this story can be felt and tasted, and it was such an enjoyable reading experience. I especially appreciated the generous attention given to the importance of preserving heritage and community as shown throughout these pages. However, this review does come with a warning: You most certainly will experience intense cravings for the fragrant dishes referenced here. But some risks are worth taking. Check it out.

    Culture, family, romance, magic, and food. Oh, the food! Everything about this story can be felt and tasted, and it was such an enjoyable reading experience. I especially appreciated the generous attention given to the importance of preserving heritage and community as shown throughout these pages. However, this review does come with a warning: You most certainly will experience intense cravings for the fragrant dishes referenced here. But some risks are worth taking. Check it out.

    Note: Quote was checked against a final, published edition.

  • Larry H

    4.5 stars

    What a wonderful book this was, full of emotion, hope, food, love, and even a little magic. But be warned, you'll be craving Chinese food long after the book has ended!!

    Seven years ago, Natalie left her home in San Francisco's Chinatown after she and her mother disagreed about Natalie's choice to become a chef. She wasn't willing to give up her dream and her mother forbade her, so Natalie left and hasn't spoken to her mother since that day. While Natalie hasn't quite succeeded, she has

    4.5 stars

    What a wonderful book this was, full of emotion, hope, food, love, and even a little magic. But be warned, you'll be craving Chinese food long after the book has ended!!

    Seven years ago, Natalie left her home in San Francisco's Chinatown after she and her mother disagreed about Natalie's choice to become a chef. She wasn't willing to give up her dream and her mother forbade her, so Natalie left and hasn't spoken to her mother since that day. While Natalie hasn't quite succeeded, she has had the chance to cook in many different parts of the world and realize how important cooking really is to her.

    "The best cooks doubled as magicians, uplifting moods and conjuring memories through the medium of food."

    She is summoned home when her mother dies suddenly. Although she had emotional problems and was agoraphobic, her death came as a surprise to those friends who cared for her. Natalie is devastated that she never had the chance to make amends and let her mother know how much she loved her despite their disagreement.

    She is also surprised at how much her neighborhood has declined&—all of the businesses that used to flourish are now in decline and disrepair, and a overly zealous real estate agent is pressuring the tenants to sell so the neighborhood could be gentrified and converted into something new.

    Natalie's biggest surprise, however, is that she has inherited her grandmother's small restaurant, which occupied the ground floor of the building she and her mother lived in. Natalie's mother refused to follow in her grandmother's footsteps, but in her will she decided to encourage Natalie's dreams after all, and encouraged her to reopen the restaurant, which was once the anchor of their community.

    The local seer tells Natalie she must cook three dishes of her grandmother's for three of their neighbors who are having trouble. How can Natalie figure out which dishes to cook, and for whom? Will cooking these dishes actually make a difference? And why should Natalie care, when her neighbors left her and her mother to fend for themselves throughout her childhood?

    is a story about finding the courage to pursue your dreams no matter who stands in your way, and not giving up even when it seems every obstacle is trying to thwart you. It's also a book about finding your place in your community, and recognizing that caring about a person doesn't always mean agreeing with all of their choices. In the end, this is also a powerful story about secrets and how surprising it can be to learn the truth about things.

    "Dreams, even modest ones, had a steep price. Mine had cost me my mother and given me the silence of seven years. Now that silence could never be breached."

    I tend to enjoy books with a little bit of magic thrown in to the plot. Roselle Lim uses evocative imagery to convey the healing and restorative power of Natalie's cooking, as well as to describe emotions. Her words are truly gorgeous and create such wonderful mind pictures. Parts of this story warmed my heart, and parts made me cry.

    Sure, the story gets a little bit melodramatic from time to time, and you pretty much can predict nearly everything that will happen in this book. But that barely mattered for me because of how much charm

    had, how it tugged at my heart, and how the recipes included in the book made my stomach growl.

    This is a quirky, sweet, tremendously endearing book that may be the perfect change of pace you're looking for. It's definitely a book I'll remember!

    See all of my reviews at

    .

    Check out my list of the best books I read in 2018 at

    .

    You can follow me on Instagram at

  • Nilufer Ozmekik

    3.45, I’m still angry of myself for being ruthless grader but that’s how I felt, I know there’s food, lots of food, tons of food, emotional parts, many, too many, heartwarming and tear-jerker parts, so many great anecdotes, remarkable messages but it didn’t resonate with me so I’m unpopular reviewer who is exiled for her punishment in the minority place stars!

    I know so many readers enjoyed this book and I swear I liked it in the beginning. But as I learned more details about the characters’ s

    3.45, I’m still angry of myself for being ruthless grader but that’s how I felt, I know there’s food, lots of food, tons of food, emotional parts, many, too many, heartwarming and tear-jerker parts, so many great anecdotes, remarkable messages but it didn’t resonate with me so I’m unpopular reviewer who is exiled for her punishment in the minority place stars!

    I know so many readers enjoyed this book and I swear I liked it in the beginning. But as I learned more details about the characters’ stories, my only reaction was getting hungry. Not a simple suffering of skipping a meal. I felt like I was starving. I felt like I attended one of the unreasonable television shows about how to loose wait in one week or how to lose your partner to a doppelganger of Barbie doll kind of show, haven’t eaten for days. So many times I gave short breaks from the book as soon as I read one of the amazing recipes and made calls so because of my too many breaks this was one of the slowest read I’ve ever done for so long. And our house is full of takeout bags and refrigerator is full of Chinese food but unfortunately they’re not as tasty as the recipe on the book.

    THE THINGS I LIKED SO MUCH (instead of recipes which made my stomach gurgle as if there’d been a secret orchestra inside me.)

    Three generations’ different POVs and perceptions about life. Grandma-mother and daughter: They’re separated by death but you may still feel their connection even by a letter or a recipe book. So touchy, heart-warming-ly, poignantly written and I think that was the best parts of this book.

    Eastern traditions , cultural rituals, ethical norms were so interesting and it really attracted my attention so I liked to read more books and watch more movies to learn more about them.

    Friendship- neighborhood bonding- connection between old and young generation to respect each other’s differences are remarkably told.

    BUT… Yes there is always a big but standing there to prevent me giving more credits to this book. I think I got fooled by the cover and I thought I could have a soft, sweet, romantic story but romance parts or the book mat be a little omitted.

    I mostly blame Elizabeth Acevedo’s “ With the fire on high” book, because so close elements, materials and structure have been used on that book and well, it was fantastic reading so I might compare those two books and this fact affected my opinion. Also Netflix’s “Always Be My Baby’s story” ( a neglected girl became a chief but she kept the recipe book of neighbor who was closer to her than her own mother and finally she opens a restaurant and only use for recipes.) had some similarities and it was real great emotional, entertaining romantic comedy.

    But the most important reason, I had a little hard time to connect with the heroine. Maybe the cultural differences or her plan to open her grandmother’s restaurant overshadowed her characterization. The neighbor stories and their character definitions are more detailed and more connectable, genuinely written in my opinion.

    I won’t stop chasing better stories because I always enjoyed reading new writers and meet with new cultures which take you different journeys and broaden your horizons with vivid knowledge. I am also not going to stop chasing better Chinese restaurants or find classes that teach me cook.

  • Tucker

    Well, this is awkward. Being sent ARCs is such a blessing that I can’t even begin to describe but it always makes me feel so bad whenever I end up hating a book I’m sent. That said, they ask for honest. And they’re about to get it. (sorry, Berkley)

    Well, this is awkward. Being sent ARCs is such a blessing that I can’t even begin to describe but it always makes me feel so bad whenever I end up hating a book I’m sent. That said, they ask for honest. And they’re about to get it. (sorry, Berkley)

    follows Natalie who has traveled back to her childhood home after her mother died. Being back is digging up old memories that she wished would stay buried. She doesn’t want to be there at all. That is, until she finds her grandmother’s old cookbook. She soon begins to cook recipies from it and starts to think about keeping up her grandmother’s legacy and re-opening her old resteraunt. I was expecting hijinks, hilarity and hot kisses but I did not get that.

    - Oh my word. I really, really hated her. I think that what was meant to endear me ended up just annoying me. For instance, she bakes a ton, which is fine, but when she starts to cause chaos with her baking (which.. What? We’ll get into the magical realism in a minute), instead of stopping. She thought

    Like, b*tch… did you not go to preschool?? Aside from her stupidity we also have her dumb trust issues. I mean, I get trust issues. I appreciate them being shown in a character as long as they’re explained and the character grows or at least realizes they need to. First off all, Natalie’s trust issues are never really explained. It doesn’t make sense or endear the character if we don’t know why! Also, she never owns up to them. I’m not asking for perfection. I just wanted her to, at least once, think:

    Like, she left her fiance on the f**king alter and we never know why and she never apologizes or anything. F**king ridiculous.

    Another staple for any good book is a plot. The bones of a novel that keep it from falling apart. This book did not have that and thus fell apart. All the milk in the world wouldn’t make this book’s bone strong enough. Yes, there were points where things happened but there was no overarching story, no end goal and nothing to look forward to. Nothing to root against or for.

    Though we get a inklings of what she wants, we never truly know what Natalie really wants. In almost every (good) book I’ve read, the main character has some deep wish, some dream but in this there really isn’t anything. Natalie’s dream storage is emptier than my bank account.

    And another thing, this book is marked as romance by a lot of my friends and on Goodreads.

    Yes, there is some slight chemestry between Daniel and Natalie but it doesn’t amount to anything. I wished that could have been developed more because it had potiential but it was kicked to the curb by Natalie’s selfishness.

    On the note of genres, this book wasn’t marked as magical realism which made me even more confused. It’s heavily implied that the cookbook and it’s recipies have magical qualities. As well as the fact that everyone around her also believes in the magical food. That said, it’s never said out loud that any of the stuff is magic which could have been okay. Like a is it real or is it not kind of situation. But something about the way that it was done just made it feel off and confusing.

    Finally, I’d like to end on the positive. To begin, the writing is gorgeous. I don’t think I have

    read a book, let alone a debut, with such prose and talent that I found in the novel. If I didn’t know, I never would have pegged this as a debut. If I had to guess, I would say this person has been writing for years and years. Also, even though the book and plot as a whole didn’t make much sense, somehow, it was still genrally captivating and enjoyable.

    Overall, I didn’t enjoy this book. That said, I know a lot of other will so don’t let my opinion slow you down from reading this bad, albeit well written, book.

    Bottom Line:

    2.5 Stars

    TW: Agorophobia

    Cover: 4/5 Characters: 2/5 Plot: 2/5 Audio: 1/5 (She kept pausing after almost every sentence and it bugged me so much.)

    Genre: Contemporary/Magical Realism

    Publication Date:

    Publisher: Berkley

    Best Format: Hardcover/Paperback

    |

    |

    |

    |

    |

    |

  • Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽

    On sale now! Review first posted on

    :

    A bitter, ongoing quarrel with her mother about her career plans to be a chef led Natalie Tan to leave her San Francisco home in anger. Seven years of stubborn silence and globe-wandering later, Natalie is called home by a neighbor at her mother’s passing. She still deeply desires to be a chef and to have her own authentic Chinese restaurant, like her grandmother Qiao had done many years earlier, and now she’ll have the chance: Natalie has i

    On sale now! Review first posted on

    :

    A bitter, ongoing quarrel with her mother about her career plans to be a chef led Natalie Tan to leave her San Francisco home in anger. Seven years of stubborn silence and globe-wandering later, Natalie is called home by a neighbor at her mother’s passing. She still deeply desires to be a chef and to have her own authentic Chinese restaurant, like her grandmother Qiao had done many years earlier, and now she’ll have the chance: Natalie has inherited her laolao’s (maternal grandmother’s) long-abandoned restaurant below their apartment. It’s still operable, though dusty and dirty, but their Chinatown neighborhood is fraying, with family-owned businesses dying and a steep rise in real estate prices causing Chinese families to move away.

    A psychically-gifted neighbor returns Qiao’s old, handmade recipe book to Natalie, along with a prediction: if Natalie cooks three recipes from the book to help three of her neighbors, as her laolao did many years ago, and is able to save these neighbors, her restaurant will be the jewel of Chinatown and the neighborhood will be revitalized. Natalie is initially dubious and reluctant ― she feels like her neighbors had let her down when she was struggling to deal with her mother’s agoraphobia years ago ― but she soon enters into the spirit of the endeavor, and magical things begin to happen when her neighbors eat her food.

    As Natalie begins cooking in Qiao’s restaurant, the scent of fried dumplings even leads a handsome young man to her restaurant and her life. But neither love nor her quest to help the neighborhood is as easy as Natalie had expected.

    is a charming, sweet tale with a dash of magical realism. I expected something like

    or a Chinese-American version of

    . What I got was more like a literary version of a Hallmark TV romance movie. It’s so lightweight as to approach being fluffy, though the immersion in Chinese culture and food serves to give it some heft and make the story more memorable. Several Chinese recipes are included in the novel, and they and the luscious descriptions of Natalie’s cooking made my mouth water. The romance subplot wasn’t particularly well-developed or romantically satisfying; I got far more enjoyment out of reading about the “plump prawns” and “tender steamed rice noodles and crunchy golden fritters.”

    Debut author Roselle Lim incorporates a few serious issues into her tale, including mental illness and the loss of ethnic urban neighborhoods. Her writing is sometimes clunky; phrases like “gathering fog brewed at the base of the gate the way steam rises from a perfect bowl of noodle soup” and “hoping the fog would thicken like salted duck congee to conceal my arrival” struck me as unintentionally humorous.

    is a warmhearted tale with an authentic Chinese voice, if not as deep and literary as one might hope. Don’t expect too much from this book and you may enjoy it.

Best Books Online is in no way intended to support illegal activity. Use it at your risk. We uses Search API to find books/manuals but doesn´t host any files. All document files are the property of their respective owners. Please respect the publisher and the author for their copyrighted creations. If you find documents that should not be here please report them


©2019 Best Books Online - All rights reserved.