All the Greys on Greene Street

All the Greys on Greene Street

SoHo, 1981. Twelve-year-old Olympia is an artist—and in her neighborhood, that's normal. Her dad and his business partner Apollo bring antique paintings back to life, while her mother makes intricate sculptures in a corner of their loft, leaving Ollie to roam the streets of New York with her best friends Richard and Alex, drawing everything that catches her eye.Then everyt...

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Title:All the Greys on Greene Street
Author:Laura Tucker
Rating:
Edition Language:English

All the Greys on Greene Street Reviews

  • Tory

    You know what? Biting the bullet. Five stars. This is a book written by an AUTHOR. Laura Tucker is someone who knows how to WRITE: to create characters, scenarios, settings, dialogue that all are from-the-gut authentic. Her words are phenomenal. Descriptions: evocative; tangible. The characters are jump-off-the-page REAL. Maybe we've seen a few too many mom-depressed-in-bed books lately, but I'm sorry, I'm going to keep reading them to remember how much my depression affects the people around me

    You know what? Biting the bullet. Five stars. This is a book written by an AUTHOR. Laura Tucker is someone who knows how to WRITE: to create characters, scenarios, settings, dialogue that all are from-the-gut authentic. Her words are phenomenal. Descriptions: evocative; tangible. The characters are jump-off-the-page REAL. Maybe we've seen a few too many mom-depressed-in-bed books lately, but I'm sorry, I'm going to keep reading them to remember how much my depression affects the people around me: to see beyond myself and keep trying to heal. Ollie is real. Richard is real. Alex is real. Apollo is real, and I want to live in their fire-escape, playground, cavorting-around-SoHo-world right there with them. Take me out for Zombie Chinese. I want to see the Terrorpole and Alex's "pet ledge." I stepped into their world for 307 pages, and I want to live with them longer. Lush, descriptive, big-hearted, REAL.

  • Vikki VanSickle

    A sensitive portrait of a young girl struggling with her place in the world after her father runs off to France for mysterious reasons and her mother retreats to her bedroom and will not come out. Ollie has great friends and adults in her life, but she goes out of her way to ensure they don't realize how dire the situation is at home with her mother, clearly suffering from depression. NYC in the 1980s is just as vibrant a character as Ollie's friends and neighbours. A great middle grade read for

    A sensitive portrait of a young girl struggling with her place in the world after her father runs off to France for mysterious reasons and her mother retreats to her bedroom and will not come out. Ollie has great friends and adults in her life, but she goes out of her way to ensure they don't realize how dire the situation is at home with her mother, clearly suffering from depression. NYC in the 1980s is just as vibrant a character as Ollie's friends and neighbours. A great middle grade read for fans of Rebecca Stead, Susin Nielsen, or Kate DiCamillo.

  • Kristen Unger

    A cat loving artist protagonist and a compelling plot. The voice rings clear and true. In Olympia, a young artist’s eye, heart, and soul are well captured.

  • Lily (Night Owl Book Cafe)

    3.5 solid stars!

    12-year-old Olympia is an artist living in SoHo in 1981, which isn’t all that uncommon in her neighborhood. Her father and his friend Apollo bring antique paintings back to life, while her mother sees the beauty in everything and makes intricate sculptures out of everyday ordinary items. But one morning she wakes up and her father has left the country, leaving her and her mom alone and now her mom won’t get out of bed. The only thing he left behind was a cryptic note that he aske

    3.5 solid stars!

    12-year-old Olympia is an artist living in SoHo in 1981, which isn’t all that uncommon in her neighborhood. Her father and his friend Apollo bring antique paintings back to life, while her mother sees the beauty in everything and makes intricate sculptures out of everyday ordinary items. But one morning she wakes up and her father has left the country, leaving her and her mom alone and now her mom won’t get out of bed. The only thing he left behind was a cryptic note that he asked for it to be destroyed. Apollo is acting strange and someone keeps calling for missing artwork.

    This was a quiet, well-written book that circles around family, friendship, art, and mystery. It touches on the subject of depression and what it means living with a parent who suffers from depression. It was easy to forget at times that Olympia was only 12-year-old girl that did not know how to deal with her mother unable to get out of bed and some of the scenes tugged on my heartstrings for the little girl that held out hope. But it was nice to see that when she finally let them, Olympia did have a great support network behind her back that ended up being there for when she needed them most. I liked that it revolved around art and there was even a bit of a mystery thrown into the mix.

    Laura Tucker’s writing overall is quiet and beautiful. Tucker really knows how to flesh out her characters and make them appear human. I found myself sympathizing with her.

    That being said, however, I struggled with the pacing of the book. I felt like the story started out and ended strong, but it meandered a bit in the middle. It could have been a bit shorter. The subject matter for middle grade was a little hard, but depression can hit an adult any point in child life, even if it is something hard to read. I also do wish the time period was used a bit more in the writing. The story is definitely very character and art driven, but it was set in 1981 in SoHo and I found the time and setting interesting choice.

    Overall. I thought this was a lovely written debut that makes me extremely excited for future works from this author. It touched on tough subjects, but very important ones. I thought in general, the author handled it really well and I cannot wait to see what she does next.

  • Heidi

    There are more books being written for a middle grade audience revolving around mental illness. This is one. This one interestingly takes place in 1981 in SoHo, New York City. I found the setting especially interesting since I knew little about SoHo in the 1980s. That Olympia and her family lived in a large, open room in an old factory was fascinating to me. The details about art and the creation of it were new to me as well. The details about how different paint colors are made was especially f

    There are more books being written for a middle grade audience revolving around mental illness. This is one. This one interestingly takes place in 1981 in SoHo, New York City. I found the setting especially interesting since I knew little about SoHo in the 1980s. That Olympia and her family lived in a large, open room in an old factory was fascinating to me. The details about art and the creation of it were new to me as well. The details about how different paint colors are made was especially fascinating to me. However, the story is not a particularly happy one, which I didn't enjoy so much.

    Olympia finds herself in a pickle. Her father has run off with his girlfriend to return a piece of art that doesn't belong to him (he stole it), leaving her and her depressed mother in the lurch. With her mother unable to get out of bed, Olympia is left to take care of herself. And she doesn't want to tell anyone because it feels like betraying her family. But finally she tells one of her friends. Eventually, her friend, Alex tells her father's business partner, Apollo, about her mother. Olympia feels betrayed, even though she knows that her mother needs help. Spending some time with Alex and his family on vacation helps her deal with some of her feelings. But an additional tragedy leaves her reeling once again, wondering what's going to happen to her.

    The story is very well written and plotted, the characters are appealing and interesting in their differences. Young readers who enjoy thoughtful, issue stories will likely enjoy this one. It does have a hopeful ending despite the ongoing challenges in Olympia's life. I picked up the book because it was billed as a bit of a mystery, but it isn't really. The mystery of Olympia's father's disappearance is fairly easy to figure out fairly early in the story (at least for me). The main story line focuses on Olympia and her mother's condition. A thoughtful, historical story revolving around the challenges that come with mental illness and the power of having an outlet for one's fears.

  • Pamela

    Mental illness, broken families, parental infidelity . . . not the most pleasant topics to read or write about in children's fiction, but sadly most necessary as many children/tweens/teens face such traumas and trials in real life every day. And Laura Tucker did an exceptional job with characterization, storyline, and decorum. Art and friendship as major themes throughout made it all the more readable.

    4.25 STARS

  • Lata

    This book was wonderful. The author dealt beautifully with depression, specifically with the depressed mother (a mixed media sculptor) of main character Olympia (Ollie). Ollie feels she can't tell anyone else, not even her two best friends Alex and Richard, that her mother hasn't gotten out of bed in days. This isn't her mother's first bout of depression, and she was adamant that if it happened again she didn't want to end up in the hospital. Also, Ollie's father has taken off to France for some

    This book was wonderful. The author dealt beautifully with depression, specifically with the depressed mother (a mixed media sculptor) of main character Olympia (Ollie). Ollie feels she can't tell anyone else, not even her two best friends Alex and Richard, that her mother hasn't gotten out of bed in days. This isn't her mother's first bout of depression, and she was adamant that if it happened again she didn't want to end up in the hospital. Also, Ollie's father has taken off to France for some unknown purpose (he's an art restorer), and Ollie is afraid that she'll have nowhere to go if her mother ends up in the hospital. Ollie tries to be a grown up and deal with her mother all on her own, and is afraid to reach out to anyone for help.

    I went into this story knowing very little about it, and was glad afterwards that I'd read it. Depression was never discussed when I was growing up; in fact, it was seen as shameful. So a book like this would have been helpful then for understanding a little about depression.

    The characterizations of Ollie and her friends, and their friendship, were believable, and her desperation to fix everything all by herself felt real. I also really enjoyed seeing the world as Ollie did; she's a budding artist, and I liked how the author described Ollie's attention to details and her enthusiasm for drawing everything around her. And, huge plus, Ollie likes cats.

  • Malissa

    "You cannot rescue somebody, little bird. You can help them. But they must rescue themselves."

    This was way better than I was anticipating. I listened to the audio initially, but also picked up the hardcover to check out the illustrations sprinkled throughout the novel. They're gorgeous.

  • Leonard Kim

    In style and pace, not a kid’s book but a grownup book with a kid protagonist. Just a few days ago, I finished another book with a mom who wouldn’t get out of bed (The True History of Lyndie B. Hawkins). That ends up being what this book is about, but it takes a very long time for that to become clear. (The subplot with The Head turns out to be a real distraction.) It took me almost 200 pages to get into the groove of reading this, but it took me a long time to get into other books I’ve read lat

    In style and pace, not a kid’s book but a grownup book with a kid protagonist. Just a few days ago, I finished another book with a mom who wouldn’t get out of bed (The True History of Lyndie B. Hawkins). That ends up being what this book is about, but it takes a very long time for that to become clear. (The subplot with The Head turns out to be a real distraction.) It took me almost 200 pages to get into the groove of reading this, but it took me a long time to get into other books I’ve read lately too (A Place to Belong, Other Words for Home) so maybe it’s me?

  • Hannah

    While Ollie sticks to graphite grey in her drawings, Tucker's debut vibrates with vivid color in its strong sense of place and well-sketched characters. It has that timeless quintessence that evokes such New York City adventures as Harriet the Spy and The Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankenweiler, and it is sure to delight fans of Rebecca Stead and Laura Marx.

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