Sparrowhawk

Sparrowhawk

After a young woman is kidnapped by an evil Faerie Queen and trapped in a far off realm, she must survive teen Victorian fairy fight club in order to get back home.As the illegitimate daughter of a Naval Captain, Artemisia has never fit in with her father’s family, nor the high class world to which they belong. However, when she is targeted by the Faerie Queen and pulled i...

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Title:Sparrowhawk
Author:Delilah S. Dawson
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Sparrowhawk Reviews

  • Steff Pasciuti

    Well, the very first thing I have to say about 

    by Delilah S. Dawson--illustrated by Matias Basla and Rebecca Nalty--is 

    , was that 

    . I was really excited to read this rather brilliant-looking graphic novel from the very first moment I saw it, intrigued by what was described as a "teen Victorian fairy fight club" and eager to see what adventures would befall this illegitimate daughter of a naval captain whose never quite fit in with her father's very white, upper class family as

    Well, the very first thing I have to say about 

    by Delilah S. Dawson--illustrated by Matias Basla and Rebecca Nalty--is 

    , was that 

    . I was really excited to read this rather brilliant-looking graphic novel from the very first moment I saw it, intrigued by what was described as a "teen Victorian fairy fight club" and eager to see what adventures would befall this illegitimate daughter of a naval captain whose never quite fit in with her father's very white, upper class family as she is pulled into the fairy realm by a voraciously conquer-minded queen. Artemisia would have to fight her way through the realms of the fairies in order to get back to her home and the ones who matter most to her, but with the way that this world she's been pulled into works, she may come out losing herself and all she holds dear along the way.

    I was blown away by this story and by the artwork. Every second reading left me at the edge of my seat, waiting to find out what would happen next and cringing at each horrible thing that happened. Artemisia's fairy guide through the world was fascinating and terrifying all at once. I found it hilarious that he told her precisely how to tell if a creature within the world was evil, by looking at its eyes, and yet she still trusted him more than just about anyone else she came across. It was a brilliant and mind-altering story and the transformation of the main character, a very cautionary tale, was all at once marvelous and horrifying.

    The conclusion was very much emotionally thrilling and dejecting, leaving you to watch in horror as the process through which you saw Artemisia go through, a sort of development backward begins anew. And I think that's the most fascinating piece of it all, really. I felt emotionally attacked at multiple points in the novel, despairing over unchangeable situations as both the story and the character delved even further into the darkness she was ultimately surrounded by, misguided by one faerie companion and given genuine good advice from another. I was little prepared for the way this tale would end, despite having seen it coming. Somehow the author managed to entrap me in this world, deepening my attachment bit by bit as the abyss of darkness opened up beneath and swallowed the story whole.

    It's like those tales where you know the worst is yet to come, that it will come, and that the horrible truths of the story will repeat themselves time and time again with another as we are all innocent and naive enough to fall into such traps and there are plenty of us to go around. And in the end, I loved every second of it, which is thoroughly surprising since I am not typically one to enjoy a dark and depressing story such as this one. Yet something about Artemisia and Crispin and Warren that completely captivated me. And I believe it will captivate a great many of you, too.

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  • Devann

    I had previously read the Ladycastle graphic novel by this author and found it to be cute but pretty lacking in both character development and subtlety, but I think this title shows a lot of growth in her as an author. I think it helped that this was five issues instead of just 4 [I always find 4 issue graphic novels to be so rushed], but the storyline about trying to find your place in the world and whether the ends truly justify the means was g

    I had previously read the Ladycastle graphic novel by this author and found it to be cute but pretty lacking in both character development and subtlety, but I think this title shows a lot of growth in her as an author. I think it helped that this was five issues instead of just 4 [I always find 4 issue graphic novels to be so rushed], but the storyline about trying to find your place in the world and whether the ends truly justify the means was great and although it was very dark I loved it [especially the end]. The art is great as well and I really love all the character designs of the different faeries and how they change depending on their actions. Definitely worth a read for people who like faerie stories.

  • Schizanthus

    Review to come after a reread.

  • Elyse

    I've read one Delilah S. Dawson book and while the concept was interesting, the execution was not my cup of tea. This on the other hand, was right up my alley. Falling into a faerie world? Yes please! I really enjoyed this graphic novel, all of the faerie creatures, our MC Artemisia, and I hope there's more to come! But the font style of the faeries was a little hard to read when you can't zoom in on Adobe Digital Editions.

  • Chad

    Artemisia is a mixed race girl living in Victorian England with her wicked step-mother and family. She gets pulled into a very dark version of faerie where she must kill to gain enough power to return home. I dug this macabre version of faerie. I find the best version of faerie are the ones where there's a bunch of ulterior motives and sly trickiness. There's also a lot about learning to accept one's self, faults and all. I loved the character designs but found the art itself to be too sloppy fo

    Artemisia is a mixed race girl living in Victorian England with her wicked step-mother and family. She gets pulled into a very dark version of faerie where she must kill to gain enough power to return home. I dug this macabre version of faerie. I find the best version of faerie are the ones where there's a bunch of ulterior motives and sly trickiness. There's also a lot about learning to accept one's self, faults and all. I loved the character designs but found the art itself to be too sloppy for my tastes.

  • Sandra

    Check out my full video review:

    Sparrowhawk is a graphic novel which take the main character Artemisia into Faire, there she must kill to be able to go back home.

    I really enjoyed this, the art beautiful and the story intriguing! I really liked the questions it rose about how you do evil for something good, and how one can change doing these actions. The end left me gasping, and I was very surprised how the overall dark the whole story was. It was trickery and clever,

    Check out my full video review:

    Sparrowhawk is a graphic novel which take the main character Artemisia into Faire, there she must kill to be able to go back home.

    I really enjoyed this, the art beautiful and the story intriguing! I really liked the questions it rose about how you do evil for something good, and how one can change doing these actions. The end left me gasping, and I was very surprised how the overall dark the whole story was. It was trickery and clever, so of course I liked it! 4/5 stars.

  • Austine (NovelKnight)

    . The cover art intrigued me and the story sucked me into a world where Artemesia (Art), looked down on by her family due to her mixed race and background, finds herself in the faerie world with no memory of the thing she loved most, her sis

    . The cover art intrigued me and the story sucked me into a world where Artemesia (Art), looked down on by her family due to her mixed race and background, finds herself in the faerie world with no memory of the thing she loved most, her sister.

    as Art works to gain power so she can escape the faerie world and return to her own where the evil Unseelie Queen threatens to destroy everything.

    how easily she drifted off the path once she loses any recollection of her sister's influence.

    especially with the trickster faerie Crispin justifying her actions.

    The most noticeable piece for me was the introduction of the Unseelie prince and the romance subplot that came from that. He acted as Art's moral compass, attempting to get her to see reason and have mercy, and I think that's where it needed to end. Let him be another companion in her journey, the voice of reason, because

    The other part was this

    With a graphic novel, the illustrations help fill in the blanks but

    why that gave her power especially when the prince mentions other ways to be powerful and it wasn't clear if he meant figuratively or literally.

    like I said, I was hooked by the cover art, but it's different from the actual story graphics. Those aren't as polished and

    I don't think it's a 

    illustration style but it's just

    I'm not sure if other issues are in the works or not (this was a bind-up of the first 5), but with the way this book ends, I wouldn't be surprised if there was more to the story.

    For More Bookish Content:

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  • Roy

    Interesting take on a fairy tale but added a lot of violence. The art just wasn't for me.

  • Mitticus

    +Digital ARC gently provided via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review+

    1851. Artemisia Gray is a mixed raced young woman , servant in her father home, that is forced through the mirror to the faerie lands.

    This is sort of Alice in Wonderland , evil bunny included, ... hacking her way throught fairyland.

    ...but beware of the tricky faeries or you could lose yourself.

    There is a kind of message here, the girl wants to be strong and free from the chains of society, but ends up

    +Digital ARC gently provided via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review+

    1851. Artemisia Gray is a mixed raced young woman , servant in her father home, that is forced through the mirror to the faerie lands.

    This is sort of Alice in Wonderland , evil bunny included, ... hacking her way throught fairyland.

    ...but beware of the tricky faeries or you could lose yourself.

    There is a kind of message here, the girl wants to be strong and free from the chains of society, but ends up

    -->THE ART: Sadly, the art fluctuate between interesting to lacking in different vignettes.

    The covers and alternates covers from 2 on are not the same as the drawings inside.

    -review in progress-["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>

  • Etienne

    That isn’t my definition of dark... and when a comic book want to be dark, it shouldn’t present illustrations are colorful like they came from a children TV shows. Big failed in every aspects. I don’t get all the positive review I read, maybe it’s just me...

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