End Times: A Brief Guide to the End of the World: Asteroids, Super Volcanoes, Rogue Robots, and More

End Times: A Brief Guide to the End of the World: Asteroids, Super Volcanoes, Rogue Robots, and More

What is going to cause our extinction? How can we save ourselves and our future? End Times answers the most important questions facing humankindEnd Times is a compelling work of skilled reportage that peels back the layers of complexity around the unthinkable-and inevitable-end of humankind. From asteroids and artificial intelligence to volcanic supereruption to nuclear war, 15-year veteran science repo/>End/>extinction?...

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Title:End Times: A Brief Guide to the End of the World: Asteroids, Super Volcanoes, Rogue Robots, and More
Author:Bryan Walsh
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Edition Language:English

End Times: A Brief Guide to the End of the World: Asteroids, Super Volcanoes, Rogue Robots, and More Reviews

  • Kathy

    End Times: A Brief Guide to the End of the World by Bryan Walsh (a former Time magazine editor and foreign correspondent) is nothing short of brilliant!

    In this thoroughly engrossing and compelling read, Walsh explores the various existential scenarios that might cause the end of humankind. He shares his detailed research into each of the possibilities, gives us important background and probability information along with what has/is being/could be done to mitigate the risk. Though thi

    End Times: A Brief Guide to the End of the World by Bryan Walsh (a former Time magazine editor and foreign correspondent) is nothing short of brilliant!

    In this thoroughly engrossing and compelling read, Walsh explores the various existential scenarios that might cause the end of humankind. He shares his detailed research into each of the possibilities, gives us important background and probability information along with what has/is being/could be done to mitigate the risk. Though this is complex information, Walsh does an excellant job in presenting it in a very understandable way.

    He repeatedly warns, as do many of the scientists that he references, that the biggest obstacle to preparing for these dangers is that people tend to bury their heads in the sand. Research shows that if people feel that the apocalypse will not occur within their lifetime, or the lifetimes of their children/grandchildren, they are content not to give priority to or taking preventative measures that should be already underway. We must take a longer-range view if we are to save ourselves and our planet.

    This is a very eye-opening book, and a real page-turner. I highly recommend to every person on the planet who can read!

    Many thanks to NetGalley and Hachette Books who let me read an ARC of this book in exchange for an unbiased review.

  • Marsha

    You'd think a book about the many ways the world could end would be depressing, but this isn't. It's highly readable and informative and there's even well-placed humour! From an alien invasion to asteroids to a climate catastrophe, this book covers a breadth of potential disasters. I found it oddly comforting because it isn't just all doom and gloom but is also about how we as humans can mitigate these potential disasters. Well done!

  • Kaitlyn

    End Times was my first glimpse into a book outside of my comfort zone. I've never read beyond fiction, but this was just so interesting. It's no unknown fact that the world is bound to come to an end soon with the way humanity is continuing to live, but the book gives a glimpse of the way it could end, and the way we could probably try to save it too.The author does a stellar job of merging research and "what-ifs" together. Each chapter leads into the next, and it gets more and more interesting

    End Times was my first glimpse into a book outside of my comfort zone. I've never read beyond fiction, but this was just so interesting. It's no unknown fact that the world is bound to come to an end soon with the way humanity is continuing to live, but the book gives a glimpse of the way it could end, and the way we could probably try to save it too.The author does a stellar job of merging research and "what-ifs" together. Each chapter leads into the next, and it gets more and more interesting further into the book. Highly recommend!

  • Brent Alley

    I read this mainly because I won in the giveaway. I've mainly been reading fantasy so this was a break in between the wheel of time series and it was a good break. It was really interesting. The author clearly put in a lot of work and research to put together a list of the most likely ways for the human population to go extinct. Kind of morbid but not really as he's also researched and put together ways to stop the various threats. A couple of them I don't think are quite as big a extinction thr

    I read this mainly because I won in the giveaway. I've mainly been reading fantasy so this was a break in between the wheel of time series and it was a good break. It was really interesting. The author clearly put in a lot of work and research to put together a list of the most likely ways for the human population to go extinct. Kind of morbid but not really as he's also researched and put together ways to stop the various threats. A couple of them I don't think are quite as big a extinction threat as he does but for the most part I agreed with what he said and now I have his research to validate my thoughts. In general I like that he inserts his opinions otherwise it would have been a dull read but I didn't really like the Trump bashing. I'm not a Trump fan anyways but it was kinda ridiculous to me to act like Trump's going to end the world, he isn't. Trump does have the ability basically as he has the ability to launch US nukes but it wouldn't benefit him. Trump only does things if they benefit him. There's no motivation for it. It would never happen. Anyways that's really my only complaint. Oh and this author wrote this because he just had a baby and I'm about a month from having one so we're in a similar boat. I want the world to survive and thrive just like he does and I see many ways we can make things better and I think humans are resilient. We got lucky to make it this far but now we have the intelligence and technology to slow or stop most of these threats and I think we'll be around for a long time.

  • Lissa

    So a strange thing happened while reading this book.  While reading a chapter about the possibility and consequences of an asteroid striking the Earth, I happened upon a news story about an asteroid coming within such a near distance to the planet that it surprised scientists.  Suffice to say, that definitely brought home the timeliness of the book.  I will say that I have read about this before (but I am a glutton for apocalyptic scenarios) but this was well written and many chapters, especiall

    So a strange thing happened while reading this book.  While reading a chapter about the possibility and consequences of an asteroid striking the Earth, I happened upon a news story about an asteroid coming within such a near distance to the planet that it surprised scientists.  Suffice to say, that definitely brought home the timeliness of the book.  I will say that I have read about this before (but I am a glutton for apocalyptic scenarios) but this was well written and many chapters, especially the one about aliens, were extremely enlightening.  I received a digital ARC of this book through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.  

  • Steve

    Interesting look at possible apocalypses

    I enjoyed this book. Despite the subject matter, Bryan Walsh manages to incorporate appropriate humor. Walsh also puts himself into the story, which I generally like. It creates a closer relationship between me and the author. When I started the book, I found the preface was grim and I wasn’t sure that I wanted to read the book but the tone of the book was actually lighter than the preface, considering the subject. It wasn’t all doom and gloom as Walsh di

    Interesting look at possible apocalypses

    I enjoyed this book. Despite the subject matter, Bryan Walsh manages to incorporate appropriate humor. Walsh also puts himself into the story, which I generally like. It creates a closer relationship between me and the author. When I started the book, I found the preface was grim and I wasn’t sure that I wanted to read the book but the tone of the book was actually lighter than the preface, considering the subject. It wasn’t all doom and gloom as Walsh discusses what we as a society can do to try to mitigate the end times. I also found no obvious biases in the book. I am happy that I didn’t let the preface discourage me and that I read the book.

    Disclosure: I received a complimentary copy of this book via Netgalley for review purposes.

  • Dan Graser

    It is one of the fundamental shortcomings and arrogance of the human psyche to always imagine that your own generation is the one likely to see the end times. Never mind the fact that everyone who has ever existed that thought this way was incorrect, we nevertheless see such nihilistic glee both from religious fundamentalists certain they will be raptured (despite the fact that the leading proponent of this idiotic theory decided to skip the rapture in favor of a heart attack at his desk) and th

    It is one of the fundamental shortcomings and arrogance of the human psyche to always imagine that your own generation is the one likely to see the end times. Never mind the fact that everyone who has ever existed that thought this way was incorrect, we nevertheless see such nihilistic glee both from religious fundamentalists certain they will be raptured (despite the fact that the leading proponent of this idiotic theory decided to skip the rapture in favor of a heart attack at his desk) and the fringe elements of social-media addicts who read an article about supervolcanos and now imagine themselves fully-qualified volcanologists ready to spout their clickbait-born expertise to their "friends."

    Thus, this somewhat nihilistically-titled work from Bryan Walsh was actually quite an enjoyable read. He plainly tackles the largest issues, both man-made and purely naturalistic, that currently threaten human survival. This includes: asteroids, volcanos, nuclear war, climate change, disease, biotechnology, AI, and extraterrestrial life. While I won't say that he adequately summarizes the probability inherent to each of these issues, he does and excellent job framing them and using the appropriate language to discuss the inherent urgency of most of them (i.e., aliens are not quite the existential threat that climate change or biologically engineered weapons are).

    Though this is not a cheery subject by any means, it is one that frequently only crops up in extremist tripe on the internet, and as such this extended work that discusses each of these in depth and with the appropriate level of fact and gravitas (and sardonic humor), is a welcome change to the discussion of these issues.

  • Peter Mcloughlin

    I literally feel sick after reading this book. It is not the author's fault it is the subject matter. Essentially there are six ways to Sunday it all could end some by nature some or (more likely) by our own hand. I know a few more by nature that could happen that the author doesn't mention but I think it is gonna be by our own hand. If you want a bowling ball in your stomach read this.

  • Rama

    An interesting perspective for the future of the planet

    The author offers an interesting view for the future from a variety of catastrophes; asteroid impact, volcanoes, nuclear war, climate change, diseases, biotech, artificial intelligence, and aliens. He articulates these world-ending apocalypse with passion. It's not just the rising tide of climate change and the deadly natural disasters that seem to be piling up with each passing year. Our very future is in danger as it has never been before

    An interesting perspective for the future of the planet

    The author offers an interesting view for the future from a variety of catastrophes; asteroid impact, volcanoes, nuclear war, climate change, diseases, biotech, artificial intelligence, and aliens. He articulates these world-ending apocalypse with passion. It's not just the rising tide of climate change and the deadly natural disasters that seem to be piling up with each passing year. Our very future is in danger as it has never been before, both from an array of cosmic and earthbound threats and from the very technologies that made us prosperous.

    We know how bad it can get; the two world wars; the Black Death which killed 200 million people in the fourteenth century; the biggest hurricanes and most devastating earthquakes. These risks are darker than the darkest days humanity has ever known. Our species has always lived under the shadow of existential risk we just didn't know it. At least five times over the course of our planet's 4.5-billion-year history, life was wiped out completely, but each time it was reborn with vengeance. It is good to know that life regenerates itself when the planet offers interesting possibilities. Solar system has another 4.5 billion years to go and earth may shape into new future.

  • Grumpus

    The demise of humanity. Asteroid? Volcano? Nuclear? Climate change? Disease? Biotechnology? Artificial Intelligence? Aliens? Excessive political editorializing not appreciated. Just the facts, please.

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