Best Friends

Best Friends

Sequel to Shannon Hale's award-winning graphic novel memoir, "Real Friends", this new graphic memoir picks up where "Real Friends" left off. As Shannon grows a little older, the rules of friendship always seem to be changing, leaving her guessing and trying her best to just keep up. "Best Friends" shares its predecessor's frankness, compassion, and enthralling, heartfelt v...

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Title:Best Friends
Author:Shannon Hale
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Best Friends Reviews

  • Barred Owl Books

    “Fresh and funny.” —New York Times Book Review

    Newbery Honor author Shannon Hale and New York Times bestselling illustrator LeUyen Pham join forces in this graphic memoir about how hard it is to find your real friends—and why it's worth the journey.

    When best friends are not forever . . .

    Shannon and Adrienne have been best friends ever since they were little. But one day, Adrienne starts hanging out with Jen, the most popular girl in class and the leader of a circle of friends called The Group. Ev

    “Fresh and funny.” —New York Times Book Review

    Newbery Honor author Shannon Hale and New York Times bestselling illustrator LeUyen Pham join forces in this graphic memoir about how hard it is to find your real friends—and why it's worth the journey.

    When best friends are not forever . . .

    Shannon and Adrienne have been best friends ever since they were little. But one day, Adrienne starts hanging out with Jen, the most popular girl in class and the leader of a circle of friends called The Group. Everyone in The Group wants to be Jen's #1, and some girls would do anything to stay on top . . . even if it means bullying others.

    Now every day is like a roller coaster for Shannon. Will she and Adrienne stay friends? Can she stand up for herself? And is she in The Group—or out?

    Parents Magazine Best Graphic Novel of 2017

    A School Library Journal Best Book of 2017

    A Chicago Public Library Best Book of 2017

    A 2017 Booklist Youth Editors' Choice

    A 2018 YALSA Great Graphic Novel

  • Courtney Lynn Werk

    I LOVED your real friends and I REALLY want to read best friends😁 i think you are a great book maker

  • Christine

    *happy sigh* I LOVED this book. Shannon Hale's writing & LeUyen Pham's illustrations perfectly capture what it feels like to be a middle school girl. I cannot recommend this book highly enough! I loved seeing how Shannon navigated all her friendships and how they weren't so cut and dry. Isn't that just how it is in life? Also, her exploration of what it means to like a boy was spot on. Do you like a boy or like like him? And is that okay? Her inclusion of anxiety in the novel was so very, ve

    *happy sigh* I LOVED this book. Shannon Hale's writing & LeUyen Pham's illustrations perfectly capture what it feels like to be a middle school girl. I cannot recommend this book highly enough! I loved seeing how Shannon navigated all her friendships and how they weren't so cut and dry. Isn't that just how it is in life? Also, her exploration of what it means to like a boy was spot on. Do you like a boy or like like him? And is that okay? Her inclusion of anxiety in the novel was so very, very perfect. I know many teens that struggle with anxiety and I'm so glad there is a graphic novel out there now that accurately portrays what that is like. Shannon's book contains no easy answers because life rarely does.

    I hope she'll keep writing books like this. I would love to see what her experience in 7th & 8th grade was like!

    Sex? No

    Swearing/Profanity? No

    Violence? No

    Magic? No

    LGBTQ + characters? Not specified.

    Could a conservative Christian school library include it?

    Absolutely! I would imagine they would jump at the chance to put in a graphic novel that includes Jesus and prayer as well as one that accurately explores what being a preteen is like.

  • Rachieee

    Shannon Hale and LeUyen Pham have done it again! It's as- if not MORE amazing as "Real Friends".

    In this book, little Shannon enters 6th grade and explores anxiety, her body, sexuality, writing (obvs), "new rules", and discovers more behind her relationship with Adrienne, Jen, Jenny, etc.

    Beginning: Almost immediately we discover that Shannon became best friends with Jen. From that information we can obviously guess that Jenny and Jen aren't as close as when we see Jenny she doesn't act as power

    Shannon Hale and LeUyen Pham have done it again! It's as- if not MORE amazing as "Real Friends".

    In this book, little Shannon enters 6th grade and explores anxiety, her body, sexuality, writing (obvs), "new rules", and discovers more behind her relationship with Adrienne, Jen, Jenny, etc.

    Beginning: Almost immediately we discover that Shannon became best friends with Jen. From that information we can obviously guess that Jenny and Jen aren't as close as when we see Jenny she doesn't act as powerful as she did before. Nicole asks if Shannon likes Amy while trying to convince to say no. Where Shannon says yes. Later Shannon discovers they were trying to see if she was a good friend because someone told them otherwise. For a few more pages, Shannon discovers more unspoken "rules" and things that aren't "cool": Not liking things for too long because Jen may not like them anymore, not taking jokes too far, not being silly at certain times, knowing what games to play, etc.

    We see more of Jenny when Shannon was walking Cynthia (her sister) and her friend while Jenny was walking with Shannon. Jenny discovers Shannon gets paid for walking them and seems jealous. So when Shannon loses her glasses she is late in a result so Jenny seized the chance and walks Cynthia 's friend home instead. We discover that Jenny got paid for that. So when Shannon confronts her Jenny admits what she did bluntly and says she won't do it again.

    (I only spoiled the beginning so you'd get the book and read the rest)

  • Christine

    This is another quasi-biographical graphic novel by Shannon Hale, and it picks up pretty much right where "Just Friends" left off. Shannon is in middle school and enjoying an elevated social status as friends of the most popular girl in school. Mean girl behavior still abides, with Shannon's friends setting her up to say incriminating things about other friends. Shannon's good nature prevents an ugly situation, but leaves her feeling uncomfortable. This was a chapter sample, and what I read was

    This is another quasi-biographical graphic novel by Shannon Hale, and it picks up pretty much right where "Just Friends" left off. Shannon is in middle school and enjoying an elevated social status as friends of the most popular girl in school. Mean girl behavior still abides, with Shannon's friends setting her up to say incriminating things about other friends. Shannon's good nature prevents an ugly situation, but leaves her feeling uncomfortable. This was a chapter sample, and what I read was really enjoyable. I loved the graphics in this book and I felt that Shannon's personality and situations were really relatable, especially to middle school girls. I can't wait to read the rest of this book when it is published!

    Thank you NetGalley for my complimentary copy in return for my honest review.

  • Laura

    Lucy (8yo) read this book twice on the evening of its “book birthday” and said it was “SO good.” A really great follow up to the stellar Real Friends. This story has the same themes as the first book, so some of the details are repeated. But the explorations of beginning adolescence are deeper—we see a scene where an adult comments on young Shannon’s body shape and Shannon feels weird about it. The comic format adds clarity and emotion to those weird feelings. There are scenes where Shannon feel

    Lucy (8yo) read this book twice on the evening of its “book birthday” and said it was “SO good.” A really great follow up to the stellar Real Friends. This story has the same themes as the first book, so some of the details are repeated. But the explorations of beginning adolescence are deeper—we see a scene where an adult comments on young Shannon’s body shape and Shannon feels weird about it. The comic format adds clarity and emotion to those weird feelings. There are scenes where Shannon feels afraid of adult men noticing her body, and a reference to periods, and she and her classmates (chastely) “go together”, so if those are themes you avoid for your kid, know that. There is also a significant reference to the Challenger spaceship tragedy. I found the treatment of all these sensitive themes to be age appropriate and nothing that my rising third grader doesn’t know about and isn’t thinking about already.

    In addition to feeling different or weird, Shannon also feels crushing anxiety and shows OCD behaviors. If you have a kid who deals with anxiety, this book may (or may not be! Pre-read!) be helpful to them. Anxious kids are not alone, and this book could provide a discussion starter to help parents discuss how those feelings affect their children day to day. I’m so thankful for the portrayal of Shannon’s overwhelming worry-feelings. It feels familiar to me, and I suspect it will feel familiar to other moms and kids.

    Finally, I LOVE Shannon’s growth as a young writer. We see her exploring possibilities for her life, learning that writers are real people and that she can be (already is!) a writer. Hale’s author’s note at the end emphasizes that her success as a writer was neither easy nor immediate. I want my daughter to take those possibilities and Hale’s example seriously.

  • Melanie Dulaney

    Readers of Libenson’s “Invisible Emmie” and Hale’s “Real Friends” will flock to the continuation of her making friends/fitting in/finding one’s self graphic novel series. The illustrations are bold and engaging and the plot, although completely predictable, will ring true with predominantly girls in grades 3-6. Librarians and ELA teachers will be thrilled that their students are reading, but will not find many examples of literary elements to use in class or for reinforcing skills in small group

    Readers of Libenson’s “Invisible Emmie” and Hale’s “Real Friends” will flock to the continuation of her making friends/fitting in/finding one’s self graphic novel series. The illustrations are bold and engaging and the plot, although completely predictable, will ring true with predominantly girls in grades 3-6. Librarians and ELA teachers will be thrilled that their students are reading, but will not find many examples of literary elements to use in class or for reinforcing skills in small groups. A few notable exceptions to that criticism would be the presence of a strong sixth grade girl voice and the ability to use the textual evidence to make predictions about the outcomes. Libraries serving the target audience will want this title and can purchase it without fear of complaints about overly mature content. Thanks for the dARC, NetGalley.

  • Charbear

    This is really a 3.5 stars from me! "Best Friends" picks up where "Real Friends" left off. Shannon is going into 6th grade, and things are still just as confusing as ever! Shannon is still dealing with anxiety, now developing into some OCD behavior, taking her anxiety to a new level. She's also dealing with crushes, understanding her relationships with boys, and trying to write her own story.

    There were some things I loved about this book, and others were a bit of a letdown for me. I have to be h

    This is really a 3.5 stars from me! "Best Friends" picks up where "Real Friends" left off. Shannon is going into 6th grade, and things are still just as confusing as ever! Shannon is still dealing with anxiety, now developing into some OCD behavior, taking her anxiety to a new level. She's also dealing with crushes, understanding her relationships with boys, and trying to write her own story.

    There were some things I loved about this book, and others were a bit of a letdown for me. I have to be honest, I liked this book, but the first one was better for me. Let's have a list of pros and cons to break it down without giving away too much.

    Pros:

    1) the author deals with anxiety in children so well. I recognized some of Shannon's behavior from my own childhood. At one point, her anxiety is so bad that she has this thought: "Everyone is ok because I'm worrying about them. If I stop worrying, something bad will happen." That, my friends, is anxiety logic. It doesn't make sense, and yet from time to time, I STILL have that thought as an adult. I had no idea that I had anxiety as a child; but as I got older I realized that the reason I was always sick was because I was worrying. This part of the book really resonated with me.

    2) The author portrays middle school so well. I remember kids being mean for apparently no reason, the awkwardness of starting to like boys, having "groups" of friends (who were absolutely ranked, she hit that nail on the head), AND being terrified of roller coasters. So realistic. I know kids today won't relate to it as much as some adults might (this book is set in 1985), and now with so much technology bullying is worse, but the the motivation behind bullies really hasn't changed. Sometimes kids are mean because they're spoiled; some are mean because they are being mistreated themselves; others are jealous; some are insecure. This book tackles all the different reasons behind the bullying.

    3) We see bits and pieces of a real story that the real Shannon wrote in 6th grade! It was so creative, and we got see a copy of the original in the back of the book. What a great encouragement to young readers who want to be creative!

    Cons: (more of letdowns for me I think)

    1) We didn't see any more of Shannon's older sister, Wendy. I loved the author's creativity with the Bear version of Wendy in the first book. It portrayed the tension and fear between the two so well. I wanted to find out more about Wendy is this book; how her modeling career was going, if she was getting any help for her own mental health, etc. There are only a couple of phone calls between her and Shannon and that's it. It disappointed me.

    2) Shannon is also typing her first story in the book, and we see bits and pieces of it illustrated. Toward the end, there is a monster (also called a horror/dread, I think it represents her anxiety) and I have to be honest, the illustration is pretty scary looking. I personally thought it was a bit too scary for younger readers, but it IS supposed to represent anxiety. I think this con is more a personal thing for me, and I doubt it will bother the majority of readers. Maybe I just have an unpopular opinion, but I think the less scary and dark images we can put out there to kids, the better.

    I still liked this book, and I hope Shannon has a third installment! "Real Friends" is my favorite thus far, but I hope this series continues! Already purchased for the juvenile collection at my library, and it's probably going to fly off the shelves.

  • Tucker

    Oh my GOSH OH my GOSH! I'm crying because I'M SO EXCITED

  • Truebluedah ♪

    12/4/18

    Yasssssssss! YAS! YAS! *BANGS HEAD ON SCREEN* YASSSSSSSSSSSS

    IS THIS REAL?

    *BANG*

    YES!

    TIS REAL!

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