In the Valleys of the Noble Beyond: In Search of the Sasquatch

In the Valleys of the Noble Beyond: In Search of the Sasquatch

On the central and north coast of British Columbia, the Great Bear Rainforest is the largest intact temperate rainforest in the world, containing more organic matter than any other terrestrial ecosystem on the planet. The area plays host to a wide range of species, from thousand-year-old western cedars to humpback whales to iconic white Spirit bears. According to local...

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Title:In the Valleys of the Noble Beyond: In Search of the Sasquatch
Author:John Zada
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Edition Language:English

In the Valleys of the Noble Beyond: In Search of the Sasquatch Reviews

  • Lisa

    Alright. So as a person who was raised in New Mexico, and Eastern California, I had never heard of this Bigfoot hoopla. Although I was born in Anchorage,Alaska,.it was just a place I was born. New Mexico, and California was.home to me. The desert and the mountains! When my parent's moved us to Northern Washington state in the 7th grade, I discovered snow, and season's! Love them! Unfortunately, I also discovered some strange arsed people who believed in Bigfoot! Sorry, but laying here in bed,

    Alright. So as a person who was raised in New Mexico, and Eastern California, I had never heard of this Bigfoot hoopla. Although I was born in Anchorage,Alaska,.it was just a place I was born. New Mexico, and California was.home to me. The desert and the mountains! When my parent's moved us to Northern Washington state in the 7th grade, I discovered snow, and season's! Love them! Unfortunately, I also discovered some strange arsed people who believed in Bigfoot! Sorry, but laying here in bed, just typing this on my kindle makes me laugh! I'm not talking about that fake lol crap. I'm seriously laughing my flannel pajamas off! I understand the need to believe in a Bigfeet "huh, huh" community. I really do. I totally believe in đź‘» ghosts. I almost, "but not really" believe in Vampires. Why not? Sure, it's crazy. But, so is a lot of other shit too! Hello, bible! I'll pick my cray, cray, and you pick yours! Do I hunt for the existence of vampires? No. I'm not that nuts. I, like others dare to believe, but don't really. That's why I love books about people who waste their time hunting for the Quatch. The fact that someone would spend so much time looking for something they believe in is fascinating to me. That's a commitment! Can't hate on that! My thanks to Netgalley and John Zada.

  • Juli

    Tales of a giant North American ape-like creature have been told for hundreds of years. Native peoples, explorers, pioneers, travelers, hunters, farmers, fisherman, campers, vacationing families....there are many legends and stories of this elusive giant cryptid creature. There are many names as well....Bigfoot. Sasquatch. Skunk Ape, Wild Man, and more. Here in Western NC, the local legend calls the creature Knobby. Does Bigfoot exist? No clue. But I have an open mind and this book caught my

    Tales of a giant North American ape-like creature have been told for hundreds of years. Native peoples, explorers, pioneers, travelers, hunters, farmers, fisherman, campers, vacationing families....there are many legends and stories of this elusive giant cryptid creature. There are many names as well....Bigfoot. Sasquatch. Skunk Ape, Wild Man, and more. Here in Western NC, the local legend calls the creature Knobby. Does Bigfoot exist? No clue. But I have an open mind and this book caught my eye. Author John Zada travelled to British Columbia, Canada to talk to area residents and to see if he could catch a glimpse of the creature himself. He talked to all sorts of people scientists, experts, members of the First Nations, hunters, trappers, farmers and gathered up tales about the Sasquatch.

    I enjoyed reading this book. Zada talks about British Columbia, the forest, wildlife, the local people, and all of the stories. He weaves a rich narrative that ends up not being just about a legendary creature, but more about the rich culture, people and beautiful landscape that keeps the legend alive.

    I'm pretty much still a skeptic that Bigfoot is an actual creature. Some sort of factual evidence (scientifically verifiable evidence not things like blurry video and bad concrete casts of footprints) would have been discovered by now, even with the remote and densely forested areas where the creatures reportedly hang out. But....I could be wrong. Up until a few years ago, most people thought giant squid were just tales told by superstitious sailors....until an actual dead giant squid was found. It was a real creature all along...not just a myth. So while I tend to be skeptical....in the event of provable fact, I would immediately change my mind. I feel the same way about any mythical creature or entity....ghosts, demons, mermaids, Mokele-Mbembe....so many tales of really awesome creatures. If giant squid were proven to be real, maybe some....or even just one....of the legendary creatures people tell stories about might also be real. And that would be awesome!

    Very enjoyable read! Zada is a very talented story teller!

    **I voluntarily read an advanced readers copy of this book from Grove Atlantic via NetGalley. All opinions expressed are entirely my own.**

  • Kamisha

    I was pleasantly surprised by how much I absolutely enjoyed reading this book! Based on the fact that it was about searching for Sasquatch in the Great Bear Rainforest of British Columbia (one of the most fascinating ecosystems in the world to me) I already knew this book was up my alley, but it was so much better than what I expected.

    In the Valleys of the Noble Beyond is about a journalist searching for signs of Sasquatch in one of the most ecologically rich forests on earth. But this is so

    I was pleasantly surprised by how much I absolutely enjoyed reading this book! Based on the fact that it was about searching for Sasquatch in the Great Bear Rainforest of British Columbia (one of the most fascinating ecosystems in the world to me) I already knew this book was up my alley, but it was so much better than what I expected.

    In the Valleys of the Noble Beyond is about a journalist searching for signs of Sasquatch in one of the most ecologically rich forests on earth. But this is so much more than simply another Squatch hunt. Zada excels at creating this beautiful narrative about this almost otherworldly place that exists on the edge of society, his empathy and respect for the Great Bear Rainforest and its denizens (human, animal, plant, and cryptid) shines through the story. I was so compelled by this read that I realized I was reading it faster than I wanted to and ended up having to slow myself down!

    Not only does Zada approach Sasquatch with hopeful rationality but he also adds an especially respectful and compelling account of the complex nature of what seeing Sasquatch or humanoid-like creatures means for certain cultures, for humans in general, and occasionally for our emotional states. I appreciated the way he balanced science and tradition. He covers many different scientific views on Bigfoot, both skeptics and believers, while also taking the time to speak with local indigenous communities and finding out what Bigfoot traditionally meant to them as a culture.

    Overall, I cannot recommend In the Valleys of the Noble Beyond enough for fellow cryptozoology enthusiasts, or even someone looking for well done nature writing!

  • dori

    Absolutely enthralling, well-written, entertaining and thorough.

    I picked this up as a curiosity (not my typical choice of read) and read it straight through, grateful that it wasn't a simpering, new age quackery of a read. Trust me when I say the author did a great job at presenting as objectively as possible on a topic such as this.

    Initially, I had my doubts, given the topic itself, but was far too curious not to request this (thank you, NetGalley!) My wife is from Vancouver Island and we live

    Absolutely enthralling, well-written, entertaining and thorough.

    I picked this up as a curiosity (not my typical choice of read) and read it straight through, grateful that it wasn't a simpering, new age quackery of a read. Trust me when I say the author did a great job at presenting as objectively as possible on a topic such as this.

    Initially, I had my doubts, given the topic itself, but was far too curious not to request this (thank you, NetGalley!) My wife is from Vancouver Island and we live in Sasquatch territory here in far northern California, and footprints have been seen. What we call the Sasquatch has existed in indigenous stories for thousands of years, here and in the unceded land many refer to as British Columbia. Many of these stories are very similar (one local tribe here says that back in the day, their ceremonies were not considered complete without an appearance). I'm not saying I fully believe just yet, but... I'm inspired to further thought by this well-written telling of yet another quest to find the big guy.

    It most certainly doesn't solve the mystery (what fun would that be? Quite honestly, despite it all, I hope Bigfoot continues to evade this mess of a human race) but if even if you've never questioned the existence of Bigfoot, you'll enjoy a ride through some incredible territory and some very interesting parts of history and geography.

  • Thomas Ryan

    Part travelogue and part mediation on travel, this is a sublime book that truly captures a unique place and explores in depth the reality of what we know about the Sasquatch and more importantly what we know about the idea and meaning of such phenomena. By far the best travel book of the summer of 2019.

  • Julie Gray

    In the Valleys of the Noble Beyond is really a deeply satisfying travelogue and social study about how our environments shape us and why our minds are so well suited to believe in supernatural phenomena. I grew up in "Bigfoot country" and so was always terrified of the myth of the Sasquatch, but I have never found any writing about the subject which isn't sensationalized or silly. I live in the Middle East, so reading about the dappled forests and silence of the Great Bear National Rain Forest

    In the Valleys of the Noble Beyond is really a deeply satisfying travelogue and social study about how our environments shape us and why our minds are so well suited to believe in supernatural phenomena. I grew up in "Bigfoot country" and so was always terrified of the myth of the Sasquatch, but I have never found any writing about the subject which isn't sensationalized or silly. I live in the Middle East, so reading about the dappled forests and silence of the Great Bear National Rain Forest was an armchair vacation for body and mind. Zada is a poetic writer and he takes a brave, deep dive into the local culture and beliefs of the area, as well as taking seriously the claims of "Sasqualogists" without demeaning or mocking them, but rather, putting it all into a fascinating context about why we need meaning and myths in our lives. Intellectually and philosophically intelligent, without a trace of sensationalism or cynicism, In the Valleys of the Noble Beyond is a worthy read.

  • Bandit

    This book had me at a mere mention of Sasquatch. Yeah, I’ll read about a guy going Sasquatch hunting. Certainly read enough about fictional versions of this story. But this book actually turned out to be so much more. A very pleasant surprise. Not a mere quest, but also a travelogue of the British Columbia coastal region and First Nation settlements there and also a meditation of why we look for mythical creatures and what it says about us as a society. The author in a very precise journalistic

    This book had me at a mere mention of Sasquatch. Yeah, I’ll read about a guy going Sasquatch hunting. Certainly read enough about fictional versions of this story. But this book actually turned out to be so much more. A very pleasant surprise. Not a mere quest, but also a travelogue of the British Columbia coastal region and First Nation settlements there and also a meditation of why we look for mythical creatures and what it says about us as a society. The author in a very precise journalistic fashion takes no sides, despite his childhood passion for Sasquatch and the like. This isn’t a passionate cryptozoology account meant to convince the disbelievers. No, this is very much a level unbiased look at the peculiar obsession with the great hairy (ape)man of the woods that has persevered throughout generations and across the world. Are they out there and are just really good at hiding? Is everyone just seeing things overwhelmed by the majestic greatness of nature? Are they an evolutionary offshoot? A legend? A fairy tale? For peoples of British Columbia’s great forested coast they are sort of an accepted fact of life. Seen or at least glimpsed with something of a frequency. John Zada visited many of these settlements (too small to qualify for any other assignation) and interviewed many of the locals. But also he observed their way of life, such distinguished historical past and such severe modern privation, where living as one with nature is no longer possible and present day commercialism, so often lacking respect for tradition and environment, threatens their very existence. It’s a very interesting representation of the inconsiderate brutality of economic progress, especially relevant for anyone living in a country like USA where as of late such things have become rampant. Apparently Canada is trying to do the right thing, but, politics being as they are, who knows for how long. If they are out there, hiding out in the great unbridled wilderness, Sasquatches are exactly right to stay away from civilization. Certainly their way of life wouldn’t be preserved either. Are they out there? John Zada isn’t saying yes and the man spent a lot of time looking in a lot of places, he does, however, gives some very clever psychological explanations for why and how someone might think they saw one. And why not, there are far less exciting things to hallucinate out there. So it’s down to what you believe or what you want to believe. Frankly, Sasquatch and co. are very easy to debunk and explain away as this book amply demonstrates. But…they are much more fun to believe in. Given the opportunity, why not choose a world with such magic in it. And as for the book, it’s a well written account, it’s interesting and dynamic. It has a positively spectacular title. One might wish for some photos, but the author makes due with vivid descriptions, so there’s that and it was a very enjoyable read. Thanks Netgalley.

  • Amit Verma

    This journal attempts to discuss myth of Sasquatch ( Big foot, Yeti) in British Columbia area by author.

    Book is wide in its coverage and covers all aspects of history, present events and hotspots related to sasquatch encounters.

    .

    It throws light on epic yeti researcher John Brindenagel and various books and testimonials about encounters with bigfoot.

    Book covers beauty of the great bear rainforest, koeye, hoodoovalley, kitasoo valley, oceanaa falls and solitude ridden wuiknuxv village.

    Author is

    This journal attempts to discuss myth of Sasquatch ( Big foot, Yeti) in British Columbia area by author.

    Book is wide in its coverage and covers all aspects of history, present events and hotspots related to sasquatch encounters.

    .

    It throws light on epic yeti researcher John Brindenagel and various books and testimonials about encounters with bigfoot.

    Book covers beauty of the great bear rainforest, koeye, hoodoovalley, kitasoo valley, oceanaa falls and solitude ridden wuiknuxv village.

    Author is unbiased and discusses various psychological baises which may lead to erroneous descriptions of encounters.

    Problems of global warming, oil spillage and reckless bear hunting is underlined and incidence showing author's encounter with bear is interesting.

    .

    .

    Part describing his feelings when when fires gunshot for first time is very nice.

    Writing is engaging and enjoyable. Description of natural beauty is awesome.

    Interspersed quotes are very nice.

    Authir has captured feelings of characters at various points in a expert manner.

    .

    When author returns home after spending days in natural solace and beauty, he has clearer vision about meaning of life and futility of modern pacy life.

    Book is recommended as a scientific exploration of human longing to decipher mysteries even at personal risk.

  • J.S.

    So, do I believe in Bigfoot, or Sasquatch? That’s probably not the right question. A better question would be: do I ever even

    about Sasquatch? And the answer would have to be no. It’s not that I believe or disbelieve, it’s just that it’s not something I spend any time thinking about. At least not since I was ten years old, but even then...

    John Zada thought about Bigfoot when he was ten years old, too, but when the opportunity came to write a book about Sasquatch encounters in British

    So, do I believe in Bigfoot, or Sasquatch? That’s probably not the right question. A better question would be: do I ever even

    about Sasquatch? And the answer would have to be no. It’s not that I believe or disbelieve, it’s just that it’s not something I spend any time thinking about. At least not since I was ten years old, but even then...

    John Zada thought about Bigfoot when he was ten years old, too, but when the opportunity came to write a book about Sasquatch encounters in British Columbia, he jumped at it. He traveled to the Great Bear Rainforest and sought out people there who have stories of Sasquatch encounters. Most of them are simply stories of hearing them yell or seeing the footprints or being terrorized by them in the middle of the night, even though they didn’t actually

    them. But he found a few who

    see them, and were willing to share their stories.

    So... if I’m not really that interested in Bigfoot, why would I read this? Well, the cover is really beautiful. And it’s a really great title. But mostly because my kids like stories like that - although I’m not sure they believe/disbelieve either - it’s just kind of fun for them. (And they still want to plan a return camping trip to the California Redwoods just so we can stop at the Bigfoot museum in Santa Cruz that was closed last time.) And I guess it just sounded interesting to me.

    Zada doesn’t come up with any earthshaking conclusions. He doesn’t even really have a whole lot of stories. What he does have is an interesting travelogue of his time among the First Peoples of BC in their remote towns and villages as he hunts stories. And

    actually turned out to be kind of interesting. Maybe not quite 4 stars interesting, but close enough to round up. And I seriously want to visit some of these small towns and out of the way places he went to. And in the end, it was kind of a fun an interesting read.

  • Deidre

    This journalistic look at Sasquatch sightings and local myths and legends didn’t make me a believer. A lot of bear stories. The author waxed philosophical too often, and it slowed the story down.

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