Leaving the Witness: Exiting a Religion and Finding a Life

Leaving the Witness: Exiting a Religion and Finding a Life

A riveting memoir of losing faith and finding freedom while a covert missionary in one of the world's most restrictive countries.A third-generation Jehovah's Witness, Amber Scorah had devoted her life to sounding God's warning of impending Armageddon. She volunteered to take the message to China, where the preaching she did was illegal and could result in her expulsion or...

DownloadRead Online
Title:Leaving the Witness: Exiting a Religion and Finding a Life
Author:Amber Scorah
Rating:

Leaving the Witness: Exiting a Religion and Finding a Life Reviews

  • Kat N

    I really enjoyed this book. Incredibly interesting and eye-opening to see how some people have lived/are living. The author tells her story with insight and wit, and brutal honesty. I laughed and I cried (boy, did I cry), and the descriptions of Shanghai teleported me there instantly. A highly original story that needed to be told. Five stars.

  • Molly

    I requested and received an ARC of this book from the publisher.

    All Amber Scorah knew was life as a Jehovah's Witness. Brought into the church at a young age by her grandmother, Amber conceived of the world as completely black and white, with JWs being the only people "inside the truth" and the only people who would live eternally. After a youthful indiscretion that almost got her kicked out of the church, she married a fellow JW and they embarked on a life in China as covert missionaries.

    Ambe

    I requested and received an ARC of this book from the publisher.

    All Amber Scorah knew was life as a Jehovah's Witness. Brought into the church at a young age by her grandmother, Amber conceived of the world as completely black and white, with JWs being the only people "inside the truth" and the only people who would live eternally. After a youthful indiscretion that almost got her kicked out of the church, she married a fellow JW and they embarked on a life in China as covert missionaries.

    Amber's faith unravels over the course of a few years, as she learns more about Chinese culture and alternative ways of looking at life, death, and spirituality. This happens with the patient prodding of a man she meets online through her work as a podcaster. With her marriage failing as well, Amber travels to the US to meet this man and sees how a life without Witnessing could be possible and even good.

    Life post-Witness isn't easy though, and Amber's struggles are really heartbreaking. The book ends almost abruptly, with her having come to no real solid conclusion about how to live life without religion and how to deal with death. That isn't really a criticism, because who among us has? Amber is very relatable despite her highly unusual life. I really enjoyed this book and her voice.

  • Jen

    Never would have guessed that in a book about Jehovah's Witnesses that I would also find a mini historical look back at the beginning of the podcast era AND Alanis Morissette's breakout album "Jagged Little Pill."

    This book really checks so many boxes: it's a spy novel, an insider's look at a religious cult, in parts it's even a coming-of-age story. And all along, it's the memoir of one very strong woman. The journey Scorah has been on in life is truly incredible, and she courageously takes you w

    Never would have guessed that in a book about Jehovah's Witnesses that I would also find a mini historical look back at the beginning of the podcast era AND Alanis Morissette's breakout album "Jagged Little Pill."

    This book really checks so many boxes: it's a spy novel, an insider's look at a religious cult, in parts it's even a coming-of-age story. And all along, it's the memoir of one very strong woman. The journey Scorah has been on in life is truly incredible, and she courageously takes you with her through all the peaks and valleys. It's as entertaining as it is inspiring, as educational as it is personal, and as thrilling as it is tragic. It is also incredibly well written, containing bits of insight and humor that can only exist when one is baring one's soul so generously.

    I read a review copy of the book, and I imagine by the time it's released in June it will have already been picked up to be made into a feature film. Kinda hope it's called "You Oughta Know."

  • Jennifer ~ TarHeelReader

    ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐

    Amber Scorah is a third-generation Jehovah’s Witness. Her life is spent believing in Armageddon and spreading the word as a witness. Amber is so devout she moves to China to minister there, where it is illegal to do so.

    To do what she did in Shanghai, Scorah had to use fake names and other measures to stay under th

    ⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️

    Amber Scorah is a third-generation Jehovah’s Witness. Her life is spent believing in Armageddon and spreading the word as a witness. Amber is so devout she moves to China to minister there, where it is illegal to do so.

    To do what she did in Shanghai, Scorah had to use fake names and other measures to stay under the radar of the authorities. She would search for people to target who might be “safe” to approach.

    She also had to look for work to make a living, and she found that in a Chinese language learning podcast. She could not tell her coworkers her true purpose. It was through this work and creativity that she was exposed to a more secular way of life, and the world opened up over time and made her question her beliefs.

    Scorah ends up “escaping” from the faith and, as a result, is shunned by her family and friends. This leads to her coming-of-age in her thirties where she finds herself with no education and support to rely on.

    Scorah travels to New York City where she experiences a personal tragedy. She has to make sense of it in a different way than she may have in the past.

    Y’all, Leaving the Witness is a beautiful book. Amber Scorah is a force. I get chills thinking of what she experienced and where she is today. Her writing is exquisite; just the kind of sparse but powerful prose I love most.

    Leaving the Witness is the inspiring and completely captivating story of Scorah’s most personal journey. The questions she raises are poignant and immensely thought-stirring. After I turned the last page, I spent several minutes processing the ending and the book. I also found this an emotional read. Scorah faces some true struggles, and the way she writes about them shows her heart and makes her completely relatable. This is a masterpiece of a memoir, and if I’ve enticed you even a little, I strongly encourage you to give it a try. I don’t give star ratings on my blog usually, but if you are curious, this is worthy of all five stars.

    I received a complimentary copy. All opinions are my own.

    My reviews can also be found on my blog:

  • Don Campbell

    I was not raised as one of Jehovah’s Witnesses, but at the age of 18 I became convinced that they had “the Truth.” But, college, my friends (especially THAT girl), and my mother’s hopes for my future delayed my decision to “give it all up for Jehovah.” But a terrible experience with drugs convinced me that the only way to find happiness was to commit fully to being a Jehovah’s Witnesses at age 20.

    Commitment meant dropping out of college even though my education was fully paid for by means of a

    I was not raised as one of Jehovah’s Witnesses, but at the age of 18 I became convinced that they had “the Truth.” But, college, my friends (especially THAT girl), and my mother’s hopes for my future delayed my decision to “give it all up for Jehovah.” But a terrible experience with drugs convinced me that the only way to find happiness was to commit fully to being a Jehovah’s Witnesses at age 20.

    Commitment meant dropping out of college even though my education was fully paid for by means of a grant I’d received. The hardest part was saying good-bye to my friends, though after my clumsy attempts at proselytizing, they were probably glad to be rid of me. After baptism, I became what was called a Pioneer, one who committed to spending one hundred hours a month in the preaching activity (30 more hours per month more than you, Amber. Of course, who’s counting?)

    After 20 years I finally left. Like Amber, it was a relationship that was the lifesaver that gave me my life. I had no degree and no savings. After all, the “End” was coming in my lifetime, back there in 1991.

    I also experienced a kind of spiritual vertigo, drawn to religion and spirituality but still distrustful of “false religion,” i.e. anything other than Jehovah’s Witnesses. Eventually, I went back to school at age 40 and was the Outstanding Religious Studies student the year I graduated. Then, I went to Seminary and received a Master’s degree in Divinity, becoming one of the most despised people in the Witness universe, a member of the clergy.

    Since leaving Jehovah’s Witnesses, I have become a proponent of interfaith and ecumenical understanding. Rather than seeing the differences between the “truth” and what everyone else believes, I understand “religion” as humanly designed systems, influenced by the culture into which they are born, that seek to answer the BIG questions. (Much too big a topic for this already too long review.)

    Amber Scorah’s book reminded me of the good, the bad, and the ugly of those days spent under the penetrating gaze of the Watchtower. I am so glad that she has written this book of her experiences. And while I don’t use this appellation any longer, I’d like to say, “Thank you, Sister Scorah.”

Best Books Online is in no way intended to support illegal activity. Use it at your risk. We uses Search API to find books/manuals but doesn´t host any files. All document files are the property of their respective owners. Please respect the publisher and the author for their copyrighted creations. If you find documents that should not be here please report them


©2019 Best Books Online - All rights reserved.