Moments We Forget

Moments We Forget

Jillian Thatcher has spent most of her life playing the family peacemaker, caught in the middle between her driven, talented older sister and her younger, spotlight-stealing twin sisters. Then on the night of her engagement party, a cancer diagnosis threatens to once again steal her chance to shine.Now, Jillian's on the road to recovery after finally finishing chemo and ra...

DownloadRead Online
Title:Moments We Forget
Author:Beth K. Vogt
Rating:

Moments We Forget Reviews

  • Renee

    “But maybe . . . maybe faith wasn’t so much about believing enough. Being enough. Maybe faith was realizing that the truth of who God was, and what He promised, was enough for all her doubts.”

    The Thatcher sisters—Jillian, Payton, and Johanna—each have their own struggles, pain, and disappointments. You’d think that would spur them to treat each other with gentleness. But not so much. They tend to push each other’s buttons and bring up old hurts before they finally get around to reacting with lov

    “But maybe . . . maybe faith wasn’t so much about believing enough. Being enough. Maybe faith was realizing that the truth of who God was, and what He promised, was enough for all her doubts.”

    The Thatcher sisters—Jillian, Payton, and Johanna—each have their own struggles, pain, and disappointments. You’d think that would spur them to treat each other with gentleness. But not so much. They tend to push each other’s buttons and bring up old hurts before they finally get around to reacting with love.

    Book #2, Moments We Forget, focuses on Jillian as she experiences one shocking life change after another. Her search for some kind of help or meaning leads to fledgling steps of faith. She experiences peace and hope—for the first time in a long, long time. We also catch up with what’s going on in Payton’s life as she weighs her doubts and fears against the possibility of a joyful future. And about half way through the story, Johanna’s problems get the best of her. As the story delves into what makes her tick, I found myself truly appreciating this character.

    Thanks to Beth Vogt for bringing these characters to life. Now I’m invested in knowing—will the Thatcher sisters find redemption, learn to love each other unconditionally, and band together for strength and support? I’ll be lining up for book #3 to find out!

    Quotes I liked . . .

    “It’s not that I don’t believe in You, God. I do. I just don’t know why I believe in You.”

    “Coffee is the gasoline of life.

    All I need is coffee and mascara.

    Behind every successful person is a substantial amount of coffee.

    I drink coffee for your protection.”

    “Chemo brain. I’d said the words out loud. Another label to live with. How many undesirable labels would I have to carry in my life? The words weighed on my heart like the breast form I wore. Awkward. Unwelcome.”

    “Every noise beyond the walls was muffled. Footsteps. Ringing phones. Voices. If I closed my eyes, the silence in the room surrounded me. Separated me from anything waiting for me. I could just be here. There was something comforting about the clean scent of ammonia that lingered in the room. I didn’t have to think about the mistakes of the past week that left me unemployed. Or the unknowns that loomed ahead of me.”

    “You’ve taught me to believe there is a God. I’m going to do my best to find my way all the way to Him . . . and hope He leads me back to you. But if . . . if He doesn’t, I’m going to believe it’s for the best.”

    ‘A single thread of hope is still a very powerful thing.’

    Part of me wished that if I turned over all those slips of paper from the glass jar Harper had given me, if I pieced them together, I’d discover a map that led me closer to God . . . or offered me the ultimate words of comfort so I would be fine without Him.

    “This is a hospital, Dr. Miller, not a sports arena. We are taking care of patients, not . . . not playing volleyball.” He laughed. Laughed. “That’s true. However, it turns out that team dynamics work on the court, in the boardroom, in the operating room . . . and in a pharmacy. Humans care about being valued and believing they are doing something important.”

    “Soft winter sunshine streamed down through the windows, surrounding the piano and the player in a golden glow. Johanna escaped into a shadowed corner and closed her eyes, exhaling as the music found its mark. It was as if the woman offered her a cup of water, lifting the glass to her parched lips and whispering, ‘Drink . . . drink.’ How she longed to lean in, to accept what the woman offered. What she’d missed. To let each chord touch the dry fragments of her soul. There’d been no music in her life for so long.”

    “It was like trying to translate something for him when I barely knew the language myself. I mixed up the words. Definitions eluded me. Had I ever understood what peace was—peace that reached deep into my heart? Or had I settled for something temporary, like the warmth of the hot chocolate as I sipped on it?”

  • Jeanne Takenaka

    Moments We Forget, by Beth Vogt, moved me. Just as real-life sisters are different from each other, the Thatcher sisters are each unique, and the tone of this story reflected Jillian’s personality so well.

    Jillian Thatcher has come out on the other side of her cancer journey and is ready to get on with life. Only, her post-cancer brain and body are not cooperating. As she grapples with how to find her “new normal” with the chemo residual effects, she struggles to accept that she can’t just get ba

    Moments We Forget, by Beth Vogt, moved me. Just as real-life sisters are different from each other, the Thatcher sisters are each unique, and the tone of this story reflected Jillian’s personality so well.

    Jillian Thatcher has come out on the other side of her cancer journey and is ready to get on with life. Only, her post-cancer brain and body are not cooperating. As she grapples with how to find her “new normal” with the chemo residual effects, she struggles to accept that she can’t just get back into the life she was living before the diagnosis.

    And, to top that off, her husband, Geoff, shares something with her that will determine a big piece of their future. She and Geoff discover what choosing to love well looks like, even through the hurt.

    This is a beautiful story of learning to thrive when all you thought you knew is no longer your reality. Jillian grapples with real-life issues in such an honest way, I can’t help but like her and cheer her on when she faces disappointments and changes.

    I loved the way Vogt weaves the three sisters’ lives together and brings healing to areas in their relationship. They are each committed to figuring out their relationship with each other, even when they don’t entirely understand each other. She writes about the various trials each sister faces with sensitivity and authenticity. None of these three women are cookie-cutter characters.

    This story’s twists and surprises had me grinning and, at times, tearing up. The themes or perseverance, loving well, and standing by each other stand out. I can’t wait to read the third book in this series.

    This book is a great read for those who enjoy relational stories that don’t have easy answers, for those who appreciate a story that makes them think about their own lives. Jillian, Johanna, and Payton Thatcher will stay with the readers well after they finish the final page.

    **I received an advance complimentary copy of the book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

  • Katie  Beth

    This is Beth's 2nd book in the Thatcher Sisters Series.

    After reading the first book (Things I Never Told You) I couldn't wait to read this book.

    I couldn't stand one of the sisters, loved one, & wanted to get to know one better. This book has made me think about my own journey and story on a deeper level. I now actually feel empathy for the sister I hated (I'm excited to read her story in book 3) and I SO identify with Jillian, the main character in Moments We Forget.

    If you want a great read

    This is Beth's 2nd book in the Thatcher Sisters Series.

    After reading the first book (Things I Never Told You) I couldn't wait to read this book.

    I couldn't stand one of the sisters, loved one, & wanted to get to know one better. This book has made me think about my own journey and story on a deeper level. I now actually feel empathy for the sister I hated (I'm excited to read her story in book 3) and I SO identify with Jillian, the main character in Moments We Forget.

    If you want a great read that will keep you turning pages, this is it!

  • Carole Jarvis

    Reviewed at The Power of Words:

    Moments We Forget is a moving, character-driven story that quickly captured my interest and never let go. The Thatcher sisters – Johanna, Jillian, and Payton – couldn’t feel more real. I’m an only child who has always yearned for siblings, so I would take these sisters in a heartbeat, flaws and all.

    Women’s fiction is my favorite genre, and Beth Vogt shines in this area. The prose flows steadily, characters are well drawn and easily relatable

    Reviewed at The Power of Words:

    Moments We Forget is a moving, character-driven story that quickly captured my interest and never let go. The Thatcher sisters – Johanna, Jillian, and Payton – couldn’t feel more real. I’m an only child who has always yearned for siblings, so I would take these sisters in a heartbeat, flaws and all.

    Women’s fiction is my favorite genre, and Beth Vogt shines in this area. The prose flows steadily, characters are well drawn and easily relatable, and emotions honest. I expect many sisters can identify with Johanna, Jillian, and Payton – who loved each other, yet couldn’t help but push each other’s buttons at times and struggled to get along. Moments We Forget is my first introduction to the series, so I’ve missed some background from Things I Never Told You, but this story can still stand alone.

    I loved the relevance of this story as the sisters struggle daily with life’s difficulties, such as the loss of a sibling and a cancer diagnosis. And rather than starting out as Christians, the series is more about an exploring of faith and all that it could mean personally. Transformation is a beautiful theme, as is the reality that love can be present in the midst of messy relationships. I came to know all three sisters well, but feel there is a lot more to learn about the often stiff and unbending Johanna.

    Highly recommended.

    I received a copy of this book through Celebrate Lit and Tyndale House. The opinions expressed in this review are entirely my own.

  • Susan Snodgrass

    ‘It was as if I stood at the edge of an open cavern, peering down into the opaque darkness. How deep was it? And if I slipped would I ever stop falling?’

    Beth Vogt continues her Thatcher Sisters series with this second in line, featuring Jillian, the middle sister. Jillian is now one year out from her breast cancer diagnosis but still dealing with the effects of chemo brain and the meds she must take for another 5 years. She is left reeling from two other blows to her life as well and just doesn’

    ‘It was as if I stood at the edge of an open cavern, peering down into the opaque darkness. How deep was it? And if I slipped would I ever stop falling?’

    Beth Vogt continues her Thatcher Sisters series with this second in line, featuring Jillian, the middle sister. Jillian is now one year out from her breast cancer diagnosis but still dealing with the effects of chemo brain and the meds she must take for another 5 years. She is left reeling from two other blows to her life as well and just doesn’t know how she can continue to stand. Then her husband, Geoff, has some secrets, too, that will affect their marriage. And oh, how we feel her pain.

    Payton, the younger sister, whose twin died 10 years earlier, is now struggling with her concept of God, especially since she is in a supposed relationship with Zach, who is a committed Christian.

    And Johanna, the eldest, the one who must control and boss everything, is back, still in a run off with Payton. These two seem to feel they have to disagree on everything. But all is not rosy in Johanna’s life, either, and Johanna does not show weakness and tell anyone her problems.

    Not having a sister, but a brother, the relationship dynamic was a bit foreign to me, but Vogt manages to plumb the depths of the sister relationship quite well. She takes us on a painful journey as we experience the deepest hurts imaginable with these women until we’re left wondering if they will ever experience true happiness of the soul. But what a journey! And there are two scenes near the end that touched my heart so very deeply that they left me absolutely bawling! Well done! I am so looking forward to Johanna’s story in the last book of the series.

    *My thanks to the publisher for a copy of this book via Net Galley. The opinions expressed here are entirely my own.

  • Madison

    Moments We Forget is the second book in the Thatcher Sister’s series. Moments We Forget continues the story of three sisters, separated by grief and circumstances, slowly working on reconciling as they each face the ups and downs of life.

    Jillian well knows her role as the middle sister - peacemaker, often the bearer of bad news and someone who knows not to challenge the spotlight-stealing older and younger sisters. But, Jillian has beaten breast cancer and she’s ready to get on with her life. Y

    Moments We Forget is the second book in the Thatcher Sister’s series. Moments We Forget continues the story of three sisters, separated by grief and circumstances, slowly working on reconciling as they each face the ups and downs of life.

    Jillian well knows her role as the middle sister - peacemaker, often the bearer of bad news and someone who knows not to challenge the spotlight-stealing older and younger sisters. But, Jillian has beaten breast cancer and she’s ready to get on with her life. Yet her newly formed marriage is struggling under two busy schedules, she can’t seem to keep up at work and the kitchen renovations that were meant to be fun are turning up endless problems. Even the book club she formed with her sisters to help them all keep in touch and get along seems destined to be one big fight. When life and circumstances get you down can these sisters be there for each other?

    Moments We Forget isn’t exactly an easy book to read. Each of the sisters face some really tough challenges, from relationship breakdowns, the fallout of cancer treatments, and unemployment or changes in their work environments, to renovations, being forced to change their dreams for the future and all the little ways that life can throw unexpected curve balls. It’s sad and a little tough to read as these sisters face so many setbacks. The book doesn’t speed through the events, taking its time to cover the months that this story spans. Yet, Moments We Forget is also about standing together, finding and holding on to love and letting go when that’s the right things to do. It’s also about the journey to faith -also often filled with bumps and many questions.

    Jillian, middle sister, cancer survivor, and newlywed, is the main protagonist of this story. Her story takes the bulk of the chapters in Moments We Forget and is written in first person. Her two sisters also have a few chapters spread throughout the story, written in third person, which neatly separates the sections. From the first book in this series, the lives of the three Thatcher sisters have been intertwined, even if they might not view it like that.

    While Moments We Forget might have a hopeful ending, it’s clear that the Thatcher sisters still have more hurdles to face. As they face the challenges of life they are each working towards finding faith and a closer relationship with each other.

    If you are looking for a thoughtful and carefully woven Christian contemporary novel about sisters and relationships, I can recommend the Thatcher Sisters series. It is perhaps best to read the books in series order to fully understand and experience the relationships between these three sisters.

    The publishers provided an advanced readers copy of this book for reviewing purposes. All opinions are my own.

    Find more reviews, reading age guides, content advisory, and recommendations on my blog

  • Becky

    Moments We Forget continues the story of the Thatcher sisters, which began in Things I Never Told You (and yes, you really should read the books in order, as much of what happens in this novel was set up in the first book). When this novel begins, middle sister Jillian has beaten breast cancer and is settling into married life ... but then circumstances arise that set her off balance and threaten all of her hopes and dreams. Youngest sister Payton finds herself open to faith for the first time i

    Moments We Forget continues the story of the Thatcher sisters, which began in Things I Never Told You (and yes, you really should read the books in order, as much of what happens in this novel was set up in the first book). When this novel begins, middle sister Jillian has beaten breast cancer and is settling into married life ... but then circumstances arise that set her off balance and threaten all of her hopes and dreams. Youngest sister Payton finds herself open to faith for the first time in her life, but she doesn't know if she's believing for herself or because that's what her deceased twin Pepper wanted for her. And oldest sister Johanna unexpectedly finds herself at a crossroads in her personal and professional life. As the three Thatcher sisters cope with the unexpected twists of life, they also take baby steps toward each other.

    After being a secondary character in Things I Never Told You, Jillian becomes the main character in Moments We Forget. After finishing her breast cancer treatment, she thought life would become easier ... but it didn't. Her story of coming to grips with her new reality and beginning a faith journey is beautiful to watch. Payton's relationship with God, which began in Things I Never Told You, continues to grow throughout this novel, and it was nice to see her more settled after the emotional roller coaster she was on in that first novel. And then there's Johanna ... I could. not. stand. her in book one, and I struggled to like her in this book, as well. She's a bossy know-it-all who can't ever say "I'm sorry." But we get to know her better in this book, and she slowly becomes more sympathetic. I'm very much looking forward to seeing how her story continues!

    When this series begins, no one in the Thatcher family has any semblance of a relationship with Christ. The faith journeys in these first two books strike me as authentic—while "lightning bolt" moments do happen, I think that probably more often, there's a slow awakening to an interest in the Lord, and then the time comes when you have to make a decision about whether you believe and choose to follow Christ. That's what's depicted here, at least with Payton and Jillian. (Something tells me that, just based on personality, Johanna's conversion—if it comes—will look a bit different.)

    Moments We Forget is a beautiful story of sisterhood, faith, and forgiveness. You'll definitely want to have a Kleenex box nearby as you read! 4-1/2 stars.

    Disclosure of material connection: I received this book from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review, and the opinions expressed are my own.

  • Chautona Havig

    The Hardest Thing about This Book and Why I Love It

    Obviously, the hardest thing about this book should be the cancer—how even after you’ve beaten it, you can lose. Lose your memory, your hopes, your dreams.

    I won’t pretend that wasn’t hard, but the point of this book is that hope isn’t found in a lack of cancer diagnosis. It’s found in Jesus.

    No, the hardest thing was watching the relationships between these sisters and seeing similarities in people you know and love—seeing how they create their o

    The Hardest Thing about This Book and Why I Love It

    Obviously, the hardest thing about this book should be the cancer—how even after you’ve beaten it, you can lose. Lose your memory, your hopes, your dreams.

    I won’t pretend that wasn’t hard, but the point of this book is that hope isn’t found in a lack of cancer diagnosis. It’s found in Jesus.

    No, the hardest thing was watching the relationships between these sisters and seeing similarities in people you know and love—seeing how they create their own pain. Seeing that avoiding the pain causes a different kind of pain.

    I love the book because the author, with brilliant use of words, welcomes you into the lives of characters. Even her point of view choices offer insights into character development and in the end, you’re left with wanting more.

    And that’s a good thing because guess what?

    This was book two. We are offered an invitation to walk through that cancer journey with Jillian in Things I Never Told You. It’s on my shelf. It’ll be hard to read. I’m walking through another cancer battle with another friend right now.

    Actually, that’s a bit… overstated. She’s walking. I’m following behind, weeping, praising God for victories, begging Him for more time (she’s stage IV), ready to be a support if she needs me but instead, being supported by her amazingness.

    This book didn’t just tell stories I related to in a brilliant and poignant way. It prepared my heart for more… for understanding more. And maybe, just perhaps… it helped prepare me for the next day when I come home from a memorial service after saying “see you soon” to a friend who has gone to be with Jesus.

    Not an easy book to read, but it’s not hard, either. I don’t know how to classify it, but I recommend it for people who value friendships, who understand broken relationships, and who want to invest a bit more in their lives. I’m so glad I requested and received a review copy. Looking forward to book one. Sort of.

  • Joan

    This is the second in a series of three novels covering the stories of sisters. Jillian is the middle sister, the one frequently ignored or otherwise discounted. She was diagnosed with breast cancer in the first novel. We follow her experiences in marriage and other relationships in this novel.

    Several relationship issues are covered in this story. The biggest one is adoption. Jillian wants to adopt while her husband is adamantly against it. Relating to this issue is the healing of past hurts. Bo

    This is the second in a series of three novels covering the stories of sisters. Jillian is the middle sister, the one frequently ignored or otherwise discounted. She was diagnosed with breast cancer in the first novel. We follow her experiences in marriage and other relationships in this novel.

    Several relationship issues are covered in this story. The biggest one is adoption. Jillian wants to adopt while her husband is adamantly against it. Relating to this issue is the healing of past hurts. Both Jillian and her husband must work through pain they still carry from childhood experiences if their marriage is to thrive.

    None of the sisters was a Christian at the beginning of the series. Two of the sisters had (part time) live in boyfriends, something unusual in “Christian” fiction. I am glad to see that changing as one of those sisters has become a Christian. There seemed to me to be lots of bickering and disagreements between the sisters and within the other relationships. I got kind of tired of reading those exchanges.

    As with the first novel, the point of view frequently changes. Jillian's experiences are told in first person while the rest of the narrative is third person. These points of view sometimes change within a chapter and I found it disconcerting.

    Even though Vogt's writing style is not my favorite, I am looking forward to the last novel in the series. The remaining sister whose story needs to be told is the oldest and the most forceful. I want to see how Vogt cracks her tough shell to be open to the gospel.

    I received a complimentary egalley of this book through Celebrate Lit. My comments are an independent and honest review.

  • Hallie Szott

    Catch up with the Thatcher sisters in Moments We Forget. This is the second book in Beth K. Vogt’s series, following Things I Never Told You, and I highly recommend reading them in order—but don’t worry; they’re both worth it.

    Sisters Johanna, Jillian, and Payton all encounter more with which to deal in this continuation, and middle-child Jillian is at the center of it all (an unfamiliar place for her to be, for sure). Life is, by no means, easy, despite what she has already overcome, and yet, th

    Catch up with the Thatcher sisters in Moments We Forget. This is the second book in Beth K. Vogt’s series, following Things I Never Told You, and I highly recommend reading them in order—but don’t worry; they’re both worth it.

    Sisters Johanna, Jillian, and Payton all encounter more with which to deal in this continuation, and middle-child Jillian is at the center of it all (an unfamiliar place for her to be, for sure). Life is, by no means, easy, despite what she has already overcome, and yet, this story pushes her to consider both her sisters and her faith through the ups and downs.

    If you love contemporary stories of sisterhood, challenging and authentic circumstances, and the discovery of faith (especially when set in Colorado!), definitely read Moments We Forget. Vogt delivers an emotional roller coaster of a story that should not be missed.

    This review is also posted on

    .

    I received a complimentary copy of this book and the opportunity to provide an honest review. I was not required to write a positive review, and all the opinions I have expressed are my own.

Best Books Online is in no way intended to support illegal activity. Use it at your risk. We uses Search API to find books/manuals but doesn´t host any files. All document files are the property of their respective owners. Please respect the publisher and the author for their copyrighted creations. If you find documents that should not be here please report them


©2019 Best Books Online - All rights reserved.