LaGuardia

LaGuardia

From Hugo, Nebula, and World Fantasy Award Winner Nnedi Okorafor (Who Fears Death, Binti, Akata series) comes Laguardia. Set in an alternative world where aliens have come to Earth and integrated with society, LaGuardia revolves around a pregnant Nigerian-American doctor, Future Nwafor Chukwuebuka, who has just returned to NYC under mysterious conditions. After smuggling a...

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Title:LaGuardia
Author:Nnedi Okorafor
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Edition Language:English

LaGuardia Reviews

  • Martin

    Read all 4 issues of this in one go. It’s terrible that this seems like a totally plausible future based on our current foreign policies.

  • Maia

    I picked up this review copy from Edelweiss because I loved Okorafor's writing for Shuri. It's not every day that an author can transition from novel-writing to comic-writing so smoothly. LaGuardia did not disappoint. I read it in one sitting.

    It's obvious from every description and the author's note that this is an allegory about 'America First' immigration policies specifically and racism and fear in America generally. Usually I find that stories suffer from being overly allegorical, but this s

    I picked up this review copy from Edelweiss because I loved Okorafor's writing for Shuri. It's not every day that an author can transition from novel-writing to comic-writing so smoothly. LaGuardia did not disappoint. I read it in one sitting.

    It's obvious from every description and the author's note that this is an allegory about 'America First' immigration policies specifically and racism and fear in America generally. Usually I find that stories suffer from being overly allegorical, but this story was unique and engaging. Although there were clear parallels with real world events, it didn't seem forced at all. She builds fearful anti-alien characters with compassion while tracing an arc that reveals the absurdity of their prejudices. She creates a large cast of characters from across the world and the universe that illustrates the complexities of immigration, war, and hatred.

    My one complaint is a common complaint I have with comics released issue by issue. Some scenes felt rushed or under-developed, and I blame this on the length restrictions for each issue. Still overall a wonderful, worthwhile read. Plus Tana Ford's art is amazing. Despite my complaints about it, I'm so glad this is a comic and not a novel, so I get to see these illustrations.

    This is an allegory about fear and prejudice, but it is not a hopeless story. It is full of love and life and growth. I highly recommend this to fans of futuristic scifi, afrofuturism, and those interested in a new way to explore issues of prejudice and immigration.

  • Paul Mirek

    The tired "aliens as Aliens" conceit gets a worthy refresh courtesy of the rich imaginations of Okorafor and Ford. This leisurely paced but affecting miniseries highlights complexities of the immigration question that are often absent from discussions in the West, visually realized in a style that recalls the birth of alternative cartooning in the '60s and '70s. For more on the creators' approach, check out

    by Illogical Volume at mindlessones.com, which contextualizes this quieter piec

    The tired "aliens as Aliens" conceit gets a worthy refresh courtesy of the rich imaginations of Okorafor and Ford. This leisurely paced but affecting miniseries highlights complexities of the immigration question that are often absent from discussions in the West, visually realized in a style that recalls the birth of alternative cartooning in the '60s and '70s. For more on the creators' approach, check out

    by Illogical Volume at mindlessones.com, which contextualizes this quieter piece alongside the cosmic apotheosis of space god Grant Morrison's opening arc of

    .

  • Alan

    I first discovered Okorafor with Binti which I loved. She's the first science fiction writer in a long time, all right maybe 10-12 years, who made go I need to start buying more of her books (and will when more of them hit paperback). So, she's writing an original science fiction comic, no problem getting me to sign up.

    This is a good examination of prejudice, especially in Trump Era America (damn, I cringe just writing that). Aliens have come to Earth, and Lagos is one of the busiest hubs for c

    I first discovered Okorafor with Binti which I loved. She's the first science fiction writer in a long time, all right maybe 10-12 years, who made go I need to start buying more of her books (and will when more of them hit paperback). So, she's writing an original science fiction comic, no problem getting me to sign up.

    This is a good examination of prejudice, especially in Trump Era America (damn, I cringe just writing that). Aliens have come to Earth, and Lagos is one of the busiest hubs for comings and goings. At the same time the U.S. has imposed even stricter restrictions on visa and passport. The reader is introduced to this when after living for years in Lagos, Future elects to return home to America and struggles just getting past TSA.

    Future's parents were physicians killed in a riot about treating patients at the New York hospital they worked in. Future herself is pregnant and has been exposed to a plant like, very intelligent, alien who's DNA has merged (at least a little) with that of her unborn child.

    After she arrives in New York we meet more of Future's family, and her neighbors (which includes other types of aliens). The story also flashes to Future's partner in Lagos. Okorafor adds context when she discusses Nigeria's history of prejudice.

    I'd like to think some people would read this, and take to heart the lessons about prejudice and family.

  • rosalind

    [read as single issues]

  • Elin (annotatedpaperbacks)

    (full review

    .)

    what initially drew me to laguardia was the writer, as nnedi okorafor is someone i’m familiar with from her previous works, especially her binti series. okorafor is an incredible africanfuturist writer, i’m always in awe of her way of writing characters who feel so real and raw, and her talent for creating interesting and believable sci-fi worlds.

    laguardia is fast paced and captivating, and is not shy about its intentions. this is a book that takes the current immigratio

    (full review

    .)

    what initially drew me to laguardia was the writer, as nnedi okorafor is someone i’m familiar with from her previous works, especially her binti series. okorafor is an incredible africanfuturist writer, i’m always in awe of her way of writing characters who feel so real and raw, and her talent for creating interesting and believable sci-fi worlds.

    laguardia is fast paced and captivating, and is not shy about its intentions. this is a book that takes the current immigration politics in the us, adds aliens from other parts of the universe, and tells a story about people who just want to have somewhere to live and study and work in peace.

    the one thing i had a bit of a though time with, was the art. a lot of the time it was great, with vibrant colours and textures i could practically feel in with my hands through the screen, but every once in a while it would just feel slightly off. human proportions were not always what i’d expect them to be.

    ultimately, laguardia is a celebration of life. life from earth and life from elsewhere. protesting and being active in support of different types of life being accepted. transcending borders and not letting you differences, skin colour or types of limbs, stand in the way of living in harmony. i mean, the main motivation for future is her pregnancy and future child. it couldn’t be more obvious. it is a beautiful sentiment, a really important look at our world, and i’d highly recommend you give it a try.

  • Amma

    I had the pleasure of receiving an ARC from the publisher through Edelweiss. As usual Okorafor provides historical context for a modern problem in the guise of science fiction. As expected, I enjoyed the story. I wish we could spend more time with the characters like Let Me Live. There are so many questions, but I guess how we readers get hooked.

  • Adam Stone

    The premise of this story is everything I look for in science fiction. It's a futuristic story that spaks clearly about problems we are having now, thus acting as a parable from the future.

    Okorafor gives us a world where aliens, referred to as florals, who look like plants are a part of our society. Certain racist countries like The United States start to restrict florals or people who have come into contact with florals. or people from countries with large floral populations, from entering the

    The premise of this story is everything I look for in science fiction. It's a futuristic story that spaks clearly about problems we are having now, thus acting as a parable from the future.

    Okorafor gives us a world where aliens, referred to as florals, who look like plants are a part of our society. Certain racist countries like The United States start to restrict florals or people who have come into contact with florals. or people from countries with large floral populations, from entering the country. Our protagonist is pregnant from her very human partner, who neither of them realized, was exposed to floral DNA, thus making her, her partner, and their yet unborn baby, part floral.

    Right up until the very end, this was a five star book for me. I loved the art, the layouts, the very imperfect but well-meaning and making-the-effort characters, the premise, the plot, the dialog, nearly everything.

    My one problem was that there is a plot point for a major characte at the end that is never really explained, and I was excited to see it explained in the next volume. But there is no next volume. That's where the story was intended to end. It left me wanting more, which is better than wanting less. Still, everything else was so good that this one flaw, happening right at the end, soured me a bit on the story.

    I still recommend the hell out of this book. It's so nearly perfect. If you like sci-fi, better representation in comics, or if you just wished Audrey II from Little House Of Horrors had a better backstory and purpose. you should check it out.

  • Sean Kottke

    In the 3.5 to 4 range. Great, timely concept, framing today's travel ban and alien issues within the context of true extraterrestrials cross-pollinating (literally) with humans. The artwork is extraordinary. The dialogue is a bit declamatory in the style of writing for young readers or propaganda, and it rushes the story forward at a pace that feels artificial. I would have liked to spend more time lingering in this world, but the urgency of events - as in real life - doesn't allow for that luxu

    In the 3.5 to 4 range. Great, timely concept, framing today's travel ban and alien issues within the context of true extraterrestrials cross-pollinating (literally) with humans. The artwork is extraordinary. The dialogue is a bit declamatory in the style of writing for young readers or propaganda, and it rushes the story forward at a pace that feels artificial. I would have liked to spend more time lingering in this world, but the urgency of events - as in real life - doesn't allow for that luxury.

  • Y.S. Stephen

    There aren't many western publishers pumping out African-based sci-fi or fantasy comic books so I was glad to see Nnedi Okorafor's LaGuardia on my Edelweiss list.

    The story itself is about aliens who came to earth as refugees and immigrants, contributed to earth's technology, then afterwards ostracised and discriminated against by humans. Thick in the middle of these events are disruptions in relationships, riots, and hidden kindness in unexpected places.

    LaGuardia strengths lie in its characters

    There aren't many western publishers pumping out African-based sci-fi or fantasy comic books so I was glad to see Nnedi Okorafor's LaGuardia on my Edelweiss list.

    The story itself is about aliens who came to earth as refugees and immigrants, contributed to earth's technology, then afterwards ostracised and discriminated against by humans. Thick in the middle of these events are disruptions in relationships, riots, and hidden kindness in unexpected places.

    LaGuardia strengths lie in its characters and setting, which is unapologetically African as well as American. Unique dialogue and its bright colours lend the work life and believability. The characters' unusual names (Future, Letme, Citizen, Payment, etc. ) takes away a bit of immersion from the reading - I found myself pausing often, not sure if the names were verbs or nouns in many cases.

    LaGuardia is a satire that reflects the stupidity of racism and discrimination based on colour geographical location. It is an African-American fantasy with a lot of heart. The names and lingo might come across as confusing at first, but it pays off in the end if you stick with it.

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