I Like to Watch: Arguing My Way Through the TV Revolution

I Like to Watch: Arguing My Way Through the TV Revolution

From The New Yorker’s fiercely original, Pulitzer Prize–winning culture critic, a provocative collection of new and previously published essays arguing that we are what we watch.From her creation of the first “Approval Matrix” in New York magazine in 2004 to her Pulitzer Prize–winning columns for The New Yorker, Emily Nussbaum has known all along that what we watch is who...

DownloadRead Online
Title:I Like to Watch: Arguing My Way Through the TV Revolution
Author:Emily Nussbaum
Rating:

I Like to Watch: Arguing My Way Through the TV Revolution Reviews

  • Trevor Groce

    Emily Nussbaum is the reason I flip to the back when I get my hands on The New Yorker. Each page offers insight and honest appraisals of many of the most important shows over the past two decades. Her love for television imbues every review with a sense of affection, even for the shows deemed a disappointment. Reading these reviews in proximity, along with some extended profiles and essays, reveals the depth of her genius and brings the reader up to speed on several aspects of the twists, turns,

    Emily Nussbaum is the reason I flip to the back when I get my hands on The New Yorker. Each page offers insight and honest appraisals of many of the most important shows over the past two decades. Her love for television imbues every review with a sense of affection, even for the shows deemed a disappointment. Reading these reviews in proximity, along with some extended profiles and essays, reveals the depth of her genius and brings the reader up to speed on several aspects of the twists, turns, and great leaps forward that have brought us to the fascinating television landscapes of today. Viewers left feeling empty after GOT ends will likely find a new fount of enthusiasm here, and expert tips for what show to go back and see with newly enlightened eyes. Highly recommended to even casual fans.

  • Andrew Barnes

    I Like to Watch is a culmination of 20+ years of revelatory television writing from Emily Nussbaum. The essays elevate the shows I’ve watched and love to greater heights. It makes me feel like an idiot for having missed others. Even when panning shows I love, I came away with a richer view of the show. Beautiful ruminations on why we watch and why television is enriching art and not the brain draining waste some dullards try and make it out to be.

  • Michael

    Witty and conversational,

    charts American television’s rise to cultural prestige and power over the past three decades. Exploring the intersection of the medium and race, class, and gender, Nussbaum touches upon everything from the aesthetics of feminist television shows to the murky ethics of product placement in broadcast programming. Through close examination of landmark shows (

    ,

    ,

    ,

    , etc.), the critic thoroughly historicizes te

    Witty and conversational,

    charts American television’s rise to cultural prestige and power over the past three decades. Exploring the intersection of the medium and race, class, and gender, Nussbaum touches upon everything from the aesthetics of feminist television shows to the murky ethics of product placement in broadcast programming. Through close examination of landmark shows (

    ,

    ,

    ,

    , etc.), the critic thoroughly historicizes television as both art and mass culture, and she makes clear how the shift to streaming has allowed for more vibrant, diverse programming to flourish. A standout (new) essay,

    , is a thoughtful exploration of the impact of #MeToo on television that doubles as a sober meditation on the differences between three waves of feminism.

  • Hannah Garden

    I think Emily Nussbaum is one of the sharpest, most illuminating thinkers I’ve ever read. There’s something so calm and level and yet deeply felt about her critiques, I find myself nodding along and yelling, “Yes!” as she makes cogent, generous, precise point after point, like I’m watching her jump hurdles, which she is! The sticky sticky hurdles of emotion, bias, and agenda that so much of my own responses to art get mired in. I feel like reading this sort of warmly observed beautifully muscula

    I think Emily Nussbaum is one of the sharpest, most illuminating thinkers I’ve ever read. There’s something so calm and level and yet deeply felt about her critiques, I find myself nodding along and yelling, “Yes!” as she makes cogent, generous, precise point after point, like I’m watching her jump hurdles, which she is! The sticky sticky hurdles of emotion, bias, and agenda that so much of my own responses to art get mired in. I feel like reading this sort of warmly observed beautifully muscular analysis plucks my brain away from the wasps nest of the internet/internet-think that it’s constantly stupidly poking and hurls it into the bright broad atmosphere of belief and conviction I am so much happier and safer and more useful in.

  • Tess

    I LIKE TO WATCH, Emily Nussbaum's collection of essays on television, is a revelation. I worked through the book much faster than anticipated. I thought I would go to each essay individually, and would take my time, but her amazing writing, insights, and interesting stories about some of my favorite television shows made the book a page-turner for me.

    Each essay is about a certain television show, yes, but it usually delves into so much more - politics, relationships, how we consume culture, and

    I LIKE TO WATCH, Emily Nussbaum's collection of essays on television, is a revelation. I worked through the book much faster than anticipated. I thought I would go to each essay individually, and would take my time, but her amazing writing, insights, and interesting stories about some of my favorite television shows made the book a page-turner for me.

    Each essay is about a certain television show, yes, but it usually delves into so much more - politics, relationships, how we consume culture, and so much more. Her critiques are both rich and nuanced, and she makes the best argument for television as art. The collection is also extremely timely. However, I think it will also endure and find myself wanting to get the hard cover copy of the book to have forever (something I rarely think to do with NetGalley books!) Five stars for sure.

  • Perry

    What a collection of perfection in perceptive criticism and thought from the incredible Emily Nussbaum, culture critic for The New Yorker. In it, she considers the high evolution of television in the past 20 years; its influence on culture; the revolutions of its ascendancy from simply entertainment into, at times, transcendent original art in which we can simultaneously find ourselves in its truths and lose ourselves. She also offers a few portraits of the artists/innovators, su

    What a collection of perfection in perceptive criticism and thought from the incredible Emily Nussbaum, culture critic for The New Yorker. In it, she considers the high evolution of television in the past 20 years; its influence on culture; the revolutions of its ascendancy from simply entertainment into, at times, transcendent original art in which we can simultaneously find ourselves in its truths and lose ourselves. She also offers a few portraits of the artists/innovators, such as Shonda Rhimes, Jenji Kohan, and Ryan Murphy.

    Worth the price of the book is her recent splendid New Yorker essay on whether the bad acts and malevolence of movers and shakers, like Harvey Weinstein, Bill Cosby, Woody Allen, Kevin Spacey, et al., does or should affect our enjoyment of their works in television and cinema.

    Rarely--maybe one other time--have I gotten to the end of a book (much less a book of commentary in essays) and seriously consider immediately re-reading--to relish again in--at least half of the pieces.

    An Absolutely Edifying Book!

  • Mehrsa

    Honestly, I don't even watch TV. But these essays are so freaking good. They are about culture and feminism and art and me too. I didn't want to watch the shows necessarily, but I did want to hear Nussbaum watch them and tell me what to think about what these shows are trying and succeeding/failing to do. I did appreciate the LOST essay because I did watch that one back in the day and I was so annoyed at the ending so that essay was satisfying.

  • Sonya

    Even if you've already read Nussbaum's New Yorker columns faithfully, the new essay, Confessions of a Human Shield, is worth the price of the book. In it, Nussbaum examines her own journey from liking and defending the work of difficult men to understanding how they fit into our current cultural morass. Particularly blistering is her discussion of the fate of Louis CK. It's an essay of and for our time.

  • Lee

    So good I almost wanted to go back and watch Sex and the City how Emily Nussbaum did.

  • Glen

    I won this book in a goodreads drawing.

    Back in college, I took a class on popular culture. It was pretty interesting. We read a lot of stuff about television. For some reason, I remember an article written about the show, The Days and Nights of Molly Dodd. It was written, I think before 1990. I remember thinking it was an awful lot of effort for a show that most people didn't watch.

    Here we are in 2019. I open this book, and the whole thing is written almost exactly like that long ago article. Sh

    I won this book in a goodreads drawing.

    Back in college, I took a class on popular culture. It was pretty interesting. We read a lot of stuff about television. For some reason, I remember an article written about the show, The Days and Nights of Molly Dodd. It was written, I think before 1990. I remember thinking it was an awful lot of effort for a show that most people didn't watch.

    Here we are in 2019. I open this book, and the whole thing is written almost exactly like that long ago article. Shows how little things have really changed in TV. There's a lot written about Sopranos and Sex in the City, and Norman Lear is lionized.

    It's like reading 1980's analysis of newer programming. Odd, perhaps entertaining, but not especially enlightening.

Best Books Online is in no way intended to support illegal activity. Use it at your risk. We uses Search API to find books/manuals but doesn´t host any files. All document files are the property of their respective owners. Please respect the publisher and the author for their copyrighted creations. If you find documents that should not be here please report them


©2019 Best Books Online - All rights reserved.