Cemetery Beach

Cemetery Beach

A professional pathfinder breaks out of a torture cell, his only ally a disaffected young murderess, in pursuit of his worst extraction scenario ever: escaping on foot across a sprawling and secret off-world colony established a hundred years ago and filled with generations of lunatics. From Warren Ellis and Jason Howard, the creators of the critically acclaimed TREES (cur...

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Title:Cemetery Beach
Author:Warren Ellis
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Cemetery Beach Reviews

  • Alan

    Back when he was writing mostly for DC/Wildstorm, Ellis did multiple mini-series, and I recall his saying something along lines of wanting to do short quick takes. Stories that were meant to read and enjoyed quickly and then you move on.

    This began very much like an 80s action movie, which hey I like a lot of those types of movies. A long range Marine scout is sent to a colony which has pretty much fallen out of contact with Earth. He is almost immediately captured by the evil and corrupt coloni

    Back when he was writing mostly for DC/Wildstorm, Ellis did multiple mini-series, and I recall his saying something along lines of wanting to do short quick takes. Stories that were meant to read and enjoyed quickly and then you move on.

    This began very much like an 80s action movie, which hey I like a lot of those types of movies. A long range Marine scout is sent to a colony which has pretty much fallen out of contact with Earth. He is almost immediately captured by the evil and corrupt colonial governor. The Marine escapes, and does so with a fellow captive, a rebel.

    Yep, it is pretty much one long sequence of explosions and chase.

    Is it well executed, yes.

    What really saved this series for me? The twist Ellis put in at the end, one I really enjoyed.

    I enjoyed it so much I almost hope no one ever talks him into writing a sequel.

  • Craig

    I'm not entirely sure what the heck this was or what the point of it was--it's essentially one long chase, stretched out over seven issues. But it wasn't absolutely terrible. Inbetween things, we get a bit of a look at this weird other world where the action takes place (apparently, some secret group managed interplanetary travel sometime in the 1920s, but they burned their ships so that the colonizers had to either succeed or die; they succeeded, but is this new world a hell or a utopia?), but

    I'm not entirely sure what the heck this was or what the point of it was--it's essentially one long chase, stretched out over seven issues. But it wasn't absolutely terrible. Inbetween things, we get a bit of a look at this weird other world where the action takes place (apparently, some secret group managed interplanetary travel sometime in the 1920s, but they burned their ships so that the colonizers had to either succeed or die; they succeeded, but is this new world a hell or a utopia?), but I don't think it's enough. The artwork is pretty sketchy throughout--it looks hurried and not fully developed. I don't know if there's more story to come--things are fairly well wrapped up at the end--but it might not be too terrible if it continues...

  • Relstuart

    Fun action movie style book with an interesting premise.

  • Roy

    Ellis has much better novels out there

  • Sam Quixote

    Warren Ellis and Jason Howard, the creative team behind Trees, reunite for a new series: Cemetery Beach. And I’m gonna stop there - I could describe the setup, the characters’ names and blah blah blah but it really doesn’t matter.

    All you need to know is that, against a futuristic backdrop, two characters have to get from Point A to Point B and a whole mess of people are trying to stop them. That’s right, Cemetery Beach is just one long action sequence!

    The characters and story are so basic that

    Warren Ellis and Jason Howard, the creative team behind Trees, reunite for a new series: Cemetery Beach. And I’m gonna stop there - I could describe the setup, the characters’ names and blah blah blah but it really doesn’t matter.

    All you need to know is that, against a futuristic backdrop, two characters have to get from Point A to Point B and a whole mess of people are trying to stop them. That’s right, Cemetery Beach is just one long action sequence!

    The characters and story are so basic that they’re unengaging to read, particularly as they’re unstoppable, making all attempts at action unexciting. The futuristic world isn’t very compelling and Ellis’ trademark sarky wit is largely absent with what little there is being unmemorable.

    I guess the action’s well done so it’s readable enough and Howard’s art is fine. If you thought the Castlevania series Ellis wrote for Netflix was the jizz, you’ll probably like this, but I found Cemetery Beach to be one-note, unimaginative, boring, about as deep as a single crepe and just as satisfying!

  • Simon

    What a hilariously deflated effort from Ellis, starting off with excellent action and old-school sci-fi vibes and ending up a 6-issue-long chase sequence with barely any stakes and a hilariously underdeveloped plot. Basically, it feels like the first 20 minutes of an okay sci-fi movie and the payoff isn't worthy of the build-up, no matter how cool the art is.

  • Artemy

    Not Warren Ellis’s best work, unfortunately. The plot is very thin, the entire book is basically one long chase scene and there are some interesting world-building ideas here, but they’re barely explored during the course of the series. Jason Howard’s art is wonderful though, and if there’s a silver lining here it’s that you get to enjoy a lot of his art completely uninterrupted by any dialogue or plot, which is nice. Still, the end result is very forgettable, which is not what I’m used to expec

    Not Warren Ellis’s best work, unfortunately. The plot is very thin, the entire book is basically one long chase scene and there are some interesting world-building ideas here, but they’re barely explored during the course of the series. Jason Howard’s art is wonderful though, and if there’s a silver lining here it’s that you get to enjoy a lot of his art completely uninterrupted by any dialogue or plot, which is nice. Still, the end result is very forgettable, which is not what I’m used to expect from one of my favorite writers.

  • Tom LA

    Two well-deserved stars. Many other reviewers rated this book the same way. Read Sam’s review, it’s spot on. No matter how dynamic the art is, the writing is one-note, boring, totally uninspired and as low-energy as a dying battery. Basically, this is not even a story.

    I read an interview with the author where he talked about this book as a "palate cleanser" in between volumes of another project he is working on, and where he proudly said "it's 140 pages with a 135 pages action scene", as an obv

    Two well-deserved stars. Many other reviewers rated this book the same way. Read Sam’s review, it’s spot on. No matter how dynamic the art is, the writing is one-note, boring, totally uninspired and as low-energy as a dying battery. Basically, this is not even a story.

    I read an interview with the author where he talked about this book as a "palate cleanser" in between volumes of another project he is working on, and where he proudly said "it's 140 pages with a 135 pages action scene", as an obviously self-aggrandizing statement. Too bad, because the book does NOT work, and it’s all because of those 135 pages of action.

    I really did have high expectations for this one. But the entire plot does not add anything at all to the little 3 lines blurb that you can read up here under the title. A disappointment of unimaginable proportions. Do not buy.

  • Valéria.

    Nothing but action-packed chase race. Good to take if you want something funny and quick and violent, full of action, not hard to read. I'm dissapointed because I expected something else. Great artwork though, all the scenes with killing and fighting and bang-bang here and there, but that's all I liked about this.

  • Alex Sarll

    The team behind brooding first-contact series Trees cut loose with a far sillier slice of SF, in which one modern-ish Earthman is sent to investigate a vaguely dieselpunk space colony quietly established decades ago by a secret cabal. Which funnily enough is on the dystopian side – though some of the most powerful moments come when its inhabitants hear how 'oldhome' is getting along, and wonder if they're not better off where they are. Every now and then Warren Ellis does one of these fast-paced

    The team behind brooding first-contact series Trees cut loose with a far sillier slice of SF, in which one modern-ish Earthman is sent to investigate a vaguely dieselpunk space colony quietly established decades ago by a secret cabal. Which funnily enough is on the dystopian side – though some of the most powerful moments come when its inhabitants hear how 'oldhome' is getting along, and wonder if they're not better off where they are. Every now and then Warren Ellis does one of these fast-paced miniseries, teetering right on the edge of being outright black comedies, and they're seldom the work of his I enjoy most. But it takes about 20 minutes to read (which is fine so long as you're not paying for it – thank heavens some libraries survived austerity, and that Image have restarted the Edelweiss ARC pipeline), and when you're investing that little time then lots of "Space-Nazi gunk-drinking bodysnatcher giant toilet planet assholes!" getting blown up will do me for a light snack.

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