The Girl Who Lived Twice

The Girl Who Lived Twice

The sixth in the Millennium series featuring THE GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO"What will you do now?""I shall be the hunter and not the hunted"The girl with the dragon tattoo is finally ready to confront her nemesis, the only woman who is evidently and in many ways her match. Salander will not wait to be hunted. When she strikes it will be a double blow: vengeance for/>"I...

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Title:The Girl Who Lived Twice
Author:David Lagercrantz
Rating:
Edition Language:English

The Girl Who Lived Twice Reviews

  • Melissa ♥ Dog/Wolf Lover ♥ Martin

    I freaking love Lisbeth, always and forever!! I’m glad he took over, he does a fine job!

    Happy Reading!

    Mel 🖤🐶🐺🐾

  • Literary Soirée

    David Lagercrantz has done a stellar job writing the last three of the six-book Dragon Tattoo series after the death of original author Stieg Larsson.

    I was captured by the latest high octane tale of genius hacker Lisbeth, evil twin Camilla, and journalist Mikael Blomkvist.

    The plot is twisty but masterfully spun by Lagercrantz. It features a deadly Mount Everest climb, ties to corrupt Swedish politicos and secret security force, Russian gangsters, and the ferocious fight b

    David Lagercrantz has done a stellar job writing the last three of the six-book Dragon Tattoo series after the death of original author Stieg Larsson.

    I was captured by the latest high octane tale of genius hacker Lisbeth, evil twin Camilla, and journalist Mikael Blomkvist.

    The plot is twisty but masterfully spun by Lagercrantz. It features a deadly Mount Everest climb, ties to corrupt Swedish politicos and secret security force, Russian gangsters, and the ferocious fight between the warring sisters.

    The author says this is his last in the series. I’m heartsick that we may never have another wild ride in this gripping world. I vote for Anthony Horowitz, authorized to continue the James Bond saga, to take up the baton. Horowitz’s Dragon Tattoo sequels would thrill!

  • James

    The Girl Who Lived Twice was on my must-read summer list. I've been a fan of the Millennium series since the original author, Steig Larsson, began writing them. When he passed away and David Lagercrantz took over, I continued reading the novels and was ready for this launch last month.

    The first half of the book is much slower than previous ones. There are minimal fight scenes, suspenseful/scary moments, or major dramatic items. There is a lot to build the story before we can understa

    The Girl Who Lived Twice was on my must-read summer list. I've been a fan of the Millennium series since the original author, Steig Larsson, began writing them. When he passed away and David Lagercrantz took over, I continued reading the novels and was ready for this launch last month.

    The first half of the book is much slower than previous ones. There are minimal fight scenes, suspenseful/scary moments, or major dramatic items. There is a lot to build the story before we can understand where the author is going with the big reveals. The second half more than makes up for it when our famous duo find themselves fighting for their lives. No spoilers here, but beware of fire and a sister scorned.

    Lisbeth has gone missing. Mikael misses her. A doctor phones Mikael about a dead body, and it intrigues the reporter enough to reach out to Lisbeth despite it seeming like she wants to stay for away from life again. He quickly learns that Lisbeth's sister, Camilla, is out to kill her over previous sins in the last book. The dead body has no connection to any of them... yet eventually, it all weaves together. From sherpas in Nepal to genealogists all over the world, there are complex layers in this story. Including the super gene, which is based on a reality I hadn't been aware of!

    Unfortunately, this book was missing something for me. I liked it, and I believe it’s a very good story, but it wasn't enough to push me above 4 stars. I settled around 3.5, rounding up because it's well written above anything else. To me, I would've liked more connections between all the characters and more detailed chase scenes in the first half. The relationship between Mikael and Lisbeth was weaker than usual, and Mikael's lust for another woman seemed fake. That said, Lisbeth's connections with other people were phenomenal. She was true to her character in much of the book, and when we keep revisiting her childhood, it's always a stronger tale.

    If you want the thrills of the early books, you probably will be slightly disappointed. If you love these characters, their adventures will keep you happy. I'm a fan, and I'll keep reading.

  • Jeffrey Keeten

    A homeless man, a beggar, missing fingers, with dark patches on his face that look like burns, is found dead in Stockholm. The freezing temperatures are a hazard for the homeless, but this man is poisoned. He has Mikael Blomkvist’s business card in his pocket. He had been trying to reach him to tell him about a story that had to be told. Unfortunately, Blomkvist never got the call, but he is still left with the mystery of this “crazy dwarf” and why he was so desperate to get ahold of him. The key is in his DNA. His DNA is going to tell the story of his life, and where he is from is going to be the slender thread that will lead Blomkvist to the story.

    Blomkvist is tired of investigating troll factories in Russia. Minister of Defense Johannes Forsell has been the victim of a Russian troll attack, a slurry of fake news that has nearly destroyed his career. The interesting thing is somehow Forsell is tied into the dead beggar. A mystery that is hard to investigate with so few trails to follow to the truth.

    Troll attacks have become a cottage industry for Putin and the Russian government. Anyone they disagree with politically is subject to these attacks. The Russians now have their fingers in American and European elections. I think we need to start taking these attacks, based on groundless lies, more seriously and see it as the act of war that it is. I want a tenacious guy like Mikael Blomkvist investigating the Russian troll factories. It is too bad he is a work of fiction, but I have a feeling, if Stieg Larsson were still alive, he would be in the thick of it.

    Lisbeth Salander, our favorite goth and righter of wrongs, is in a cat and mouse game with her sister, Camilla. Her sister is another broken member of the Zalachenko family. She is evil, and yet Lisbeth freezes at the thought of killing her, even though killing her is the only solution to stopping her. When Blomkvist becomes a pawn in the middle of their sibling war, things get very real for Lisbeth in a hurry. The guilt, shame, and sympathy that is crippling her perceptions of her sister suddenly become secondary concerns to keeping Blomkvist out of the clutches of her sister.

    So we have Blomkvist’s investigation and Salander’s family obsession that start out being two separate quests, but the reason why their relationship is so strong is because they frequently need each other’s help in their search for truth, or in Salander’s case...revenge. It is an unusual partnership, but a very productive one.

    For those who have not enjoyed David Lagercrantz’s depiction of Salander, you will be again disappointed that she doesn’t morph into the Stieg Larsson version. There were a couple of places where I felt that she would have done something different with Larsson guiding her actions. The thing is, fair readers, that ship has sailed. You can complain and tear your hair out all you want, but this version of Salander is Lagercrantz’s version, and it is the only version you will get unless you want to go back and read the first three. The Dragon Tattoo depiction of Salander died when Larsson climbed that set of stairs that induced a massive heart attack. I think Lagercrantz’s version of Blomkvist is spot on. I’m adjusting to his version of Salander. Writer’s brains work differently. Lagercrantz isn’t Larsson anymore than Larsson could be Lagercrantz. Well, he would have to be alive to be anything, but you know what I mean.

    Call this Salander the 2.0 model. Sometimes the remake doesn’t live up to the original, but that doesn’t mean it is terrible or an abomination.

    3.5 out of 5 stars with a bump up to 4 because I’m a glass half full kind of guy.

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  • Bradley

    Every time I pick up one of these books by a dead author I really admired, continued by Mr. Lagercrantz, I feel a deep fear, an ill-boding, as if I'm really going to regret it.

    And yet, when I crack open the book, I'm always pleasantly surprised. Is it because I love the characters from the originals so much that I just don't care? Maybe.

    Is it because I actually have fun with the new plots? Maybe.

    Is it because I'm still having fun at all, that despite all this trepidation

    Every time I pick up one of these books by a dead author I really admired, continued by Mr. Lagercrantz, I feel a deep fear, an ill-boding, as if I'm really going to regret it.

    And yet, when I crack open the book, I'm always pleasantly surprised. Is it because I love the characters from the originals so much that I just don't care? Maybe.

    Is it because I actually have fun with the new plots? Maybe.

    Is it because I'm still having fun at all, that despite all this trepidation, I still look forward to getting the book and reading it anyway, that I am plainly ENJOYING MYSELF, that I keep coming back?

    Maybe.

    Or maybe it's just the Sherpa murder.

    No. It has to be more than murdered Sherpas.

    Honestly.

  • Laura Noggle

    I wanted this to be better than it was. Such a disappointment, although I’ve been alright with the Lagercrantz continuation—this one falls way short of anything that’s come before.

    A watered down Lisbeth Salander is barely in the book, instead nudged out by an overly bloated conspiracy plot.

    *le sigh*

  • Paromjit

    There are many readers who, like me, cannot quite let go of Stieg Larsson's Lisbeth Salander, and have ended up reading David Lagercrantz's resurrected Lisbeth, even when you can feel that there is likely to be a sense of disappointment upon reading his latest addition to this iconic series. There were elements of this that I enjoyed reading in this plot driven narrative, but nothing can disguise the glaring shortfalls when it comes to characterisation and character development, and nowhere is t

    There are many readers who, like me, cannot quite let go of Stieg Larsson's Lisbeth Salander, and have ended up reading David Lagercrantz's resurrected Lisbeth, even when you can feel that there is likely to be a sense of disappointment upon reading his latest addition to this iconic series. There were elements of this that I enjoyed reading in this plot driven narrative, but nothing can disguise the glaring shortfalls when it comes to characterisation and character development, and nowhere is this more apparent than in a Lisbeth who feels like an empty shell, a parody rather than an authentic creation. This along with the creaking weaknesses of some of the plotlines makes for an unsatisfactory whole, although there are some thrills to be gained as the different threads begin to connect near the end.

    Lisbeth is in Moscow, and has reinvented herself into the persona of conventional businesswoman, albeit one who carries a gun. Motivated by her need to gain vengeance, she has her evil but beautiful sister, Camilla, in her sights but finds herself crippled by a past that threatens to destroy her in the present. Camilla has some formidable allies, such as Russian GRU military intelligence agent, Ivan Galinov, a charming if entirely ruthless man, and Zvezda Bratva, the criminal enterprise established by Salander's brutal father, the now dead Alexander Zalachenko. In the meantime, in Stockholm, Mikael Blomkvist is unsettled, worried about Lisbeth, and gets drawn into the death of an extraordinary unidentified homeless man that is beginning to look like murder and acquires a surprising girlfriend in Catrin Lindas. In a story that takes in Russian troll factories churning out lies, disinformation and fake news to destabilise democracy globally, a Swedish government minister being torn apart by his past, the Russian criminal underworld, and a tragic 2008 Everest mountaineering party, it all culminates in deadly danger edging towards those close to Lisbeth.

    I have no doubt that many readers will enjoy Lagercrantz's latest outing for Salander, and I admit that there were aspects of the novel that absorbed and engaged, but it is undoubtedly an uneven read. There is a part of me that doesn't envy Lagercrantz at all, it must be difficult having to shoulder the huge expectations of the army of fans devoted to Larsson's Salander that anyone would struggle with, if not impossible to fulfil, few could face this burden with equanimity. For those of you planning to read this, I hope you enjoy this, there is much that is entertaining about it. Many thanks to Quercus for an ARC.

  • Jonathan K

    A fan of the Dragon Tattoo trilogy, I've found the sequels written by this author lackluster. With this story, he's done a good job researching areas like genetics, added new characters and brought back the memories of Zalachenko's physical abuse of his wife and daughters. Bringing Lisbeth's sister, Camilla in as the antagonist is somewhat of a twist, one we hadn't seen in the past. Adding Inspector Bublanski and Modig along with flashbacks from the original series, it seems obvious the goal was

    A fan of the Dragon Tattoo trilogy, I've found the sequels written by this author lackluster. With this story, he's done a good job researching areas like genetics, added new characters and brought back the memories of Zalachenko's physical abuse of his wife and daughters. Bringing Lisbeth's sister, Camilla in as the antagonist is somewhat of a twist, one we hadn't seen in the past. Adding Inspector Bublanski and Modig along with flashbacks from the original series, it seems obvious the goal was similar energy of the originals. When compared to best selling crime/suspense novelists, his pace is slow until the final chapters where it picks up rapidly. He tends to overuse dialog; use of detailed meal descriptions that have little to do with the story seems amateur, though it's possible the translator is at fault. Since Stieg Larsson set a high bar for these characters, Lagercrantz has yet to achieve it, this story included.

  • Dimitris Passas

    Let me begin by stating that I was in favor of the continuation of Millenium series by an author other than the late Stieg Larsson and I've enjoyed the first two books ("The Girl in the Spider's Web", "The Girl Who Took An Eye for An Eye") but this one failed to meet my, admittedly high, expectations. It is an overall mediocre attempt in bringing beloved fictional characters such as Lisbeth Salander or Mikael Blomkvist back to life, in a story which lacks a clear direction and a plot that seems

    Let me begin by stating that I was in favor of the continuation of Millenium series by an author other than the late Stieg Larsson and I've enjoyed the first two books ("The Girl in the Spider's Web", "The Girl Who Took An Eye for An Eye") but this one failed to meet my, admittedly high, expectations. It is an overall mediocre attempt in bringing beloved fictional characters such as Lisbeth Salander or Mikael Blomkvist back to life, in a story which lacks a clear direction and a plot that seems to be flat and without the necessary exciting twists and turns that usually make a crime novel a success.

    Lisbeth has a secondary role here, and even though her conflict with her sister Camilla is built from the early pages, she is mainly busy with hacking in order to help Mikael to uncover the truth about a suspicious suicide of a foreign man, who was once a guide at Mountain Everest. The main plotline seems compelling enough in the first part of the novel but it quickly reveals its weak structure and lack of inspiration. When the reader learns the truth about the beggar's suicide in the third and final part of the book, he is not sure if he really cares any longer. The subplot concerning the feud between Lisbeth and Camilla is equally dull and the final showdown is so implausible that almost makes you laugh.

    David Lagercrantz's prose has a nice flow but seems to be rather naive in some parts while the characterization in "The Girl Who Lived Twice" is not as strong as it was in the previous two novels. Both the two protagonists, Mikael and Lisbeth, seem to be constantly out of depth, while the secondary characters and villains, who were one of the most interesting aspects even in S. Larsson's original "Millenium" trilogy, are outlined in an awkward manner. Lagercrantz tries to connect the book's plotline with those of the previous two but even that is unsuccessful as the result seems -more or less- forced.

    There was a major conflict between the Larsson's family members, Stieg's father and brother, and Eva Gabrielsson, Stieg's partner for more than thirty years, regarding the rights in the "Millenium" legacy. Gabrielsson claims to be the only person suitable to continue the series, as she was involved in some parts in the original trilogy -though not in the writing process itself- mainly having to do with some of the characters and locations used in the novels. Thus, she was not supportive of D. Lagercrantz's writing endeavor, but the Larsson family, who finally inherited the rights, agreed and gave him the green light to extend the series. The reading audience was divided into two groups, with some absolutely loving the new novels and others hating it. Personally, I was positive from the beginning as I'm in favor of bold writing experiments like this one. Unfortunately, "The Girl Who Lived Twice", which is the last book in the series written by Lagercrantz, left me with a bitter taste and as I finished reading, I couldn't help but feeling kind of nostalgic remembering the original trilogy's brilliance.

  • Tim

    My least favored of the series thus far. It seems scattered and incomplete. 4 of 10 stars

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