My Tiny Pet

My Tiny Pet

A witty celebration of the tiny tardigrade, a microscopic creature that looks like a bearLiving in a tiny house has one huge drawback--no space for pets. So when a little girl's parents announce that it's time for the family to simplify, downsizing from a huge home in the city to a tiny house in the woods, it's quite a blow--after all, she's grown quite fond of her pet poo...

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Title:My Tiny Pet
Author:Jessie Hartland
Rating:
Edition Language:English

My Tiny Pet Reviews

  • Alice

    5 stars for this clever pet book that ties into the downsizing craze

  • Rhiannon Johnson

    Read my review in the August 2019 issue of Missoula Lifestyle magazine

    Most parents are familiar with the negotiations involved in choosing a new pet, but Jessie Hartland puts a clever spin on the situation with a child’s very unique pet choice. When one girl’s personal pet menagerie grows out of control (6 poodles, 10 cats, a tarantula, 2 snakes, 3 hedgehogs, 10 mice, countless birds, hundreds of fish, a

    Read my review in the August 2019 issue of Missoula Lifestyle magazine

    Most parents are familiar with the negotiations involved in choosing a new pet, but Jessie Hartland puts a clever spin on the situation with a child’s very unique pet choice. When one girl’s personal pet menagerie grows out of control (6 poodles, 10 cats, a tarantula, 2 snakes, 3 hedgehogs, 10 mice, countless birds, hundreds of fish, an octopus, 3 rabbits, a pony, a pig, a goat, and 3 turtles) her overwhelmed parents announce it is time to simplify and downsize. However, after finding all her pets good homes and moving from a large home in the city to a tiny house in the woods, she begins her persistent request for just one pet. Initially met with resistance from her parents, she explains that the pet she wants is smaller than an ant and it needs no special beds, toys, food, or walking. She then introduces her intrigued parents to a tardigrade, also called a “water bear,” and the family agrees that this microscopic creature is the perfect pet for their small lifestyle.

    Inspiration for My Tiny Pet came from Jessie Hartland’s favorite science class, protozoology, and the Life at the Limits show at New York’s American Museum of Natural History which was advertised with subway posters featuring the tardigrade. Hartland then combined the bizarre and fascinating facts about tardigrades with the downsizing and tiny house movements to create a quirky and whimsical picture book full of her endearing folk art-style illustrations. Each page is bursting with silly details, making the book wonderfully fun for reading aloud and sure to delight readers of all ages.

  • Michelle

    This animal was the answer to a bar trivia question!! LMAO!

  • Clementine

    this was so smart, so well done, and will definitely find an audience.

  • Mrs Mommy Booknerd http://mrsmommybooknerd.blogspot.com

    A cute story about a girl who loves her pets, but her family is moving to a tiny house. What will she do with all of her pets? Then after moving into her family's new tiny home how will she find the perfect pet to fit into this new simpler life? Read this cute and beautifully illustrated book that has important scientific and pet maintenance taking points. A story that will create great dialogue both in the classroom and at home!

  • Jj

    It was delightful! I enjoyed this irreverent story of a family continually downsizing and simplifying, and the tale of how the young narrator winds up with a Tardigrade (you may already know them from such common names as Water Bear or Moss Pig) for a pet.

    I always enjoy Jessie Hartland's illustrations, and this whimsical story she has crafted suits them perfectly.

    Thanks to Penguin Young Readers for the review copy.

  • Edward Sullivan

    A little girl with minimalist parents convinces the microscopic tardigrade is an acceptable pet.

  • Abigail

    Used to living in a large house in the city, together with her parents and numerous pets, a young girl must adjust when her mother and father decide to downsize, moving them to a tiny house in the middle of the woods. Having placed all of her animal companions in good homes, the girl misses having a pet, and pleads with her parents to be allowed to have just one. At first they refuse, until she suggests the microscopic tardigrade...

    The second picture-book I have read from author/illustrator Jess

    Used to living in a large house in the city, together with her parents and numerous pets, a young girl must adjust when her mother and father decide to downsize, moving them to a tiny house in the middle of the woods. Having placed all of her animal companions in good homes, the girl misses having a pet, and pleads with her parents to be allowed to have just one. At first they refuse, until she suggests the microscopic tardigrade...

    The second picture-book I have read from author/illustrator Jessica Hartland, following upon her biographical

    ,

    features a fascinating creature - the tiny tardigrade, also known as a "water bear" - that I have not seen before in the pages of children's literature. The story here is engaging, and although I'm not sure I understand why the girl can't at first have at least one pet, despite the smaller living quarters, I'm sure many children will identify with her desire for an animal companion. The artwork here reminds me in style of

    - colorful, almost collage-like, with lots to look at on the page - and although I do not find it appealing personally, it is quite interesting. This is one I would recommend to all young animal lovers, to any child who is moving house, and to those interested in microscopic life.

  • La Coccinelle

    The concept of this book is sort of cute. Who ever considered a tardigrade as a pet? Kids will learn quite a bit about these nifty little creatures... as long as they can stomach the sight of them (this might be an issue for more sensitive readers).

    In this story, a child with lots of pets is forced to give them all up when her parents decide to downsize. Living in a tiny house is okay... but the girl still really wants a pet. Her parents, however, don't budge... until she brings up the idea of t

    The concept of this book is sort of cute. Who ever considered a tardigrade as a pet? Kids will learn quite a bit about these nifty little creatures... as long as they can stomach the sight of them (this might be an issue for more sensitive readers).

    In this story, a child with lots of pets is forced to give them all up when her parents decide to downsize. Living in a tiny house is okay... but the girl still really wants a pet. Her parents, however, don't budge... until she brings up the idea of the microscopic tardigrade, or "water bear". It's the perfect pet for a tiny house. Actually, it's the perfect pet if you want something you can take anywhere, since it's so small. (The only downside is that you need a microscope if you want to actually be able to look at your pet.)

    While I like the overall premise and the child's clever decision to get a tardigrade for a pet, I do not like the parents' actions in this one. After moving to a tiny house at the beginning of the book, forcing the child to give up all of her more traditional pets, the pair decide that their tiny house (with just one room and a sleeping loft) isn't nearly small enough, so they decide to move into a treehouse in the forest. The kid doesn't really care because she can keep her tardigrade, but at what point does this obsession with tiny spaces start to look like child neglect? What happens when she's a teenager? Is she going to be okay sleeping squished between her parents on a cot that folds out from the wall? (The fact that these people downsized by choice and not out of necessity just makes them come across like pretentious rich folk who are trying to virtue signal by living like they're on the border of homelessness. It's rather distasteful. Tiny houses are fine, but I don't like seeing people forcing their children to live in cramped spaces--and taking away their animal companions--when they don't actually need to.)

    So this one was just okay for me. I like the concept of the tardigrade as a practical pet that can fit in any living space, no matter how small... but I don't like the reason the girl had to resort to a pet like that in the first place.

  • Abby Johnson

    This is a cute take on a kid-wants-a-pet story. When her parents decide to downsize and move to a tiny house, a little animal-loving girl decides to make her case for just one pet: a tardigrade. How can any parent turn down a request for a pet that's smaller than an ant's eye?! This story has a nice sprinkling of STEM and a good problem-solving plotline.

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