The Mosquito: A Human History of Our Deadliest Predator

The Mosquito: A Human History of Our Deadliest Predator

A pioneering and groundbreaking work of narrative nonfiction that offers a dramatic new perspective on the history of humankind, showing how through millennia, the mosquito has been the single most powerful force in determining humanity's fateWhy was gin and tonic the cocktail of choice for British colonists in India and Africa? What does Starbucks have to thank for its gl...

DownloadRead Online
Title:The Mosquito: A Human History of Our Deadliest Predator
Author:Timothy C. Winegard
Rating:

The Mosquito: A Human History of Our Deadliest Predator Reviews

  • Jennifer M.

    The Mosquito is a compilation of sorts. It not only tells the history of mosquitoes and the damage they have done throughout the centuries, but also how we got to where society and culture is, based on this annoying little bug. The book includes pictures of different types of mosquitoes, what sort of attributes to look for, etc.

    I found this book fascinating. There were so many things I didn't realize that history was shaped by, one of which being a blood-sucking bug. The Mosquito is informative,

    The Mosquito is a compilation of sorts. It not only tells the history of mosquitoes and the damage they have done throughout the centuries, but also how we got to where society and culture is, based on this annoying little bug. The book includes pictures of different types of mosquitoes, what sort of attributes to look for, etc.

    I found this book fascinating. There were so many things I didn't realize that history was shaped by, one of which being a blood-sucking bug. The Mosquito is informative, astounding and, at times, even a little frightening.

    But mostly, this book opened my eyes to things I never would have conceived of. And honestly, that's the best type of book. My dad's birthday was two months ago, and it looks like this will have to be a late birthday present. It's just the sort of book he loves. (And me too!)

    5/5 Stars

  • Nancy

    The Outsize Role of the Mosquito in the Sweep of Human History

    For a tiny insect the mosquito has had a major role in shaping human history. Yellow Fever, Dengue Fever, Malaria, West Nile Virus, and other diseases are caused by agents injected into the human host by one or another of the species of mosquitoes in the environment. The early chapters of the book give a graphic description of the diseases and suffering. It makes you want to wear protective gear when going outside in the summer.

    For c

    The Outsize Role of the Mosquito in the Sweep of Human History

    For a tiny insect the mosquito has had a major role in shaping human history. Yellow Fever, Dengue Fever, Malaria, West Nile Virus, and other diseases are caused by agents injected into the human host by one or another of the species of mosquitoes in the environment. The early chapters of the book give a graphic description of the diseases and suffering. It makes you want to wear protective gear when going outside in the summer.

    For centuries it was unclear that the mosquito was responsible for the scourge of diseases that wrecked havoc with armies and empires. The American Revolution saw Washington’s army as well as the British ransacked by malaria. The scourge of the Civil War and building the Panama Canal was Yellow Fever.

    One of the protections against malaria is sickle cell anemia, a mutation of the blood cells that survived in Africa because it gave protection to the person. Unfortunately, sickle cell itself is a killer, as the author points out.

    I enjoyed this book. It’s full of historical information about the interaction between mosquitoes and humans. The writing is clear and subject matter so interesting you want to keep reading. I highly recommend this book if you want to learn more about how the environment can affect civilization.

    I received this book from Dutton for this review.

  • Steve

    Interesting but meanders

    I enjoyed this book. As Timothy Winegard mentions, this is more of a history book than a science book, however what little science there is, is clearly explained. Winegard shows a good sense of humor in his writing, but otherwise I found his writing slighted stilted and lacking the conversational tone I like in science writing. I also found that the book took long irrelevant detours through history, so there were pages I just glossed over. For the reader looking for more

    Interesting but meanders

    I enjoyed this book. As Timothy Winegard mentions, this is more of a history book than a science book, however what little science there is, is clearly explained. Winegard shows a good sense of humor in his writing, but otherwise I found his writing slighted stilted and lacking the conversational tone I like in science writing. I also found that the book took long irrelevant detours through history, so there were pages I just glossed over. For the reader looking for more specific information on mosquito-transmitted diseases, I recommend Molly Caldwell Crosby’s “The American Plague: The Untold Story of Yellow Fever, the Epidemic That Shaped Our History” and Sonia Shah’s “The Fever: How Malaria Has Ruled Humankind for 500,000 Years.” However if the reader is more interested in the broad sweep of history, then The Mosquito is a fine book.

    Disclosure: I received a complimentary copy of this book via Netgalley for review purposes.

  • Christopher Kennedy

    Timothy Winegard offers a unique and incredibly articulate perspective on the history of humankind pertaining to the mosquito. He charts the impact that the mosquito has had on the outcomes of major events, including the fall of ancient empires and the American Civil War, successfully arguing that the mosquito has changed the course of history. Winegards breadth of knowledge is something to be admired.

  • Jill Elizabeth

    What a fascinating book this was!! I kept reading/reciting the facts aloud to whomever was in the room or nearby when I read - there are so many intriguing and surprising things to learn here, that I felt compelled to share them. It took me a while to read - it's long and there's a LOT of information here, but it is packaged very well, although I did occasionally find that I needed to take a short break for something a little less death-and-disease focused (it is, after all, summer and I couldn'

    What a fascinating book this was!! I kept reading/reciting the facts aloud to whomever was in the room or nearby when I read - there are so many intriguing and surprising things to learn here, that I felt compelled to share them. It took me a while to read - it's long and there's a LOT of information here, but it is packaged very well, although I did occasionally find that I needed to take a short break for something a little less death-and-disease focused (it is, after all, summer and I couldn't make myself or my family too crazy worrying about mosquitoes to enjoy the day!)... But the writing was great - engaging and entertaining while remaining true to the fact-sharing non-fiction nature of its core.

  • Donna Huber

    If you ever wanted an overview of human history from the beginning to present day, then this is the book to pick up. It isn't science history and there are large chunks where the mosquito and its deadly diseases aren't even mentioned. A lot of focus on battles and wars. It was an interesting and educational read. Read my full review at

    .

  • Justin

    Received the arc from Netgalley for free in exchange for a review.

    You can find my full review here:

  • Justin

    ***I was granted an ARC of this via Netgalley from the publisher.***

    From the mosquitos possible impact on the extinction of the dinosaurs, to the famous battlefields of history and the scientific advancements made to stop their spread of disease, readers will be given an engaging account of the mosquitos silent war against humanity.

    You can find my full review in the links provided.

    Rating: 4 stars. Would recommend to a friend.

  • Amber Spencer

    This was an interesting book. I was really into parts and was bored and wondering where things were going at other parts. Debating between 3-4 stars.

  • Melanie Ullrich

    Super interesting book when it wasn't an in depth world history lesson...which was most of it unfortunately.

Best Books Online is in no way intended to support illegal activity. Use it at your risk. We uses Search API to find books/manuals but doesn´t host any files. All document files are the property of their respective owners. Please respect the publisher and the author for their copyrighted creations. If you find documents that should not be here please report them


©2019 Best Books Online - All rights reserved.