The Green Lantern, Vol. 1: Intergalactic Lawman

The Green Lantern, Vol. 1: Intergalactic Lawman

Legendary writer Grant Morrison is taking Green Lantern back to his roots, exploring the popular hero's role as the universe's best space cop. It's Law and Order in space as Hal Jordan encounters a mysterious alien hiding in plain sight, setting off a chain of events that will bring the Green Lantern Corps to its knees!When Green Lantern Hal Jordan encounters an alien...

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Title:The Green Lantern, Vol. 1: Intergalactic Lawman
Author:Grant Morrison
Rating:

The Green Lantern, Vol. 1: Intergalactic Lawman Reviews

  • Malum

    4.5 stars.

    This is lots of fun, and very different from a lot of the Green Lantern content from the past several years.

    First of all, Morrison's run is very bronze age. He also uses a lot of bronze age corp members that haven't been around for a while, like Volk and Rot Lop Fan. We also get a lot of major Hal/Guardian butting of heads that was so common in the bronze age books.

    Hal's power level also seems way boosted here. He was always really strong (he does, after all, wield the most powerful

    4.5 stars.

    This is lots of fun, and very different from a lot of the Green Lantern content from the past several years.

    First of all, Morrison's run is very bronze age. He also uses a lot of bronze age corp members that haven't been around for a while, like Volk and Rot Lop Fan. We also get a lot of major Hal/Guardian butting of heads that was so common in the bronze age books.

    Hal's power level also seems way boosted here. He was always really strong (he does, after all, wield the most powerful weapon in the universe), but here he pretty much crushes any adversary with no problem and even challenges gods. This version of Hal Jordan would probably give Marvel's Galactus a run for his money. I actually really liked this, because Morrison then has to find problems for Hal to solve that can't simply be punched.

    The biggest change here, though, is the whole focus of the book. This is less a superhero comic and more of a "space police procedural". The corp are commonly referred to as police here and they spend a lot of time gathering clues, questioning suspects, going undercover, and performing arrests rather than just punching Sinestro into jelly.

    Finally, Morrison introduces a new villain-a vampire-and the last issue or two really focuses on horror, which I thought was pretty cool.

    Overall, a great start to the new GL run and I am really excited to see where it goes.

  • Tiago

    One of the wackiest, trippiest superhero books I've ever read, everything is just so alien. Morrison makes you feel like you're actually out there in space, experiencing the vast unknown. There's a lot of creativity going on here, unfortunely the plot suffers from it, its convoluted and that plot about planet Earth being abducted doesn't really make much sense if you think about it, but hey... I thought Morrison did it for kicks and it was definitely fun to read, it had that whole

    One of the wackiest, trippiest superhero books I've ever read, everything is just so alien. Morrison makes you feel like you're actually out there in space, experiencing the vast unknown. There's a lot of creativity going on here, unfortunely the plot suffers from it, its convoluted and that plot about planet Earth being abducted doesn't really make much sense if you think about it, but hey... I thought Morrison did it for kicks and it was definitely fun to read, it had that whole

    vibe to it and that's always a good thing.

    So yeah, this is not your usual superhero book, and if that's not really your thing, there's always Liam Sharp, his art alone makes this book worthwhile, along with the coloring team. You know its that good when you spend minutes staring at the illustrations.

    Totally recommended!

  • Chad

    Like most of Morrison's superhero work, this digs into DC's past. Most of the stranger Green Lanterns in the book have been around since the Bronze Age. Alan Moore first introduced the virus GL, Leezle Pon in the 80s and Medphyll (the broccoli head GL) was introduced in the 60s. Everything from the writing to the art feels very Bronze Age-ian in a

    (DC's sci-fi horror title of the era) way. It's all very alien with a dark horror vibe. The thing has space vampires! But this is

    Like most of Morrison's superhero work, this digs into DC's past. Most of the stranger Green Lanterns in the book have been around since the Bronze Age. Alan Moore first introduced the virus GL, Leezle Pon in the 80s and Medphyll (the broccoli head GL) was introduced in the 60s. Everything from the writing to the art feels very Bronze Age-ian in a

    (DC's sci-fi horror title of the era) way. It's all very alien with a dark horror vibe. The thing has space vampires! But this is also a space cop procedural with Hal Jordan going undercover to infiltrate an offshoot of the Darkstars.

  • Christopher (Donut)

    THE Green Lantern by THE Grant Morrison.

    Real emphasis on Hal as a space cop.

    The art and the story both want to comprise all SF and fantasy from Flash Gordon through Wally Wood's Weird Science, Frazetta's Vampirella, down to Ethan Van Sciver and XO Manowar.

    For example, here's a splash page which looks like it's from 1929:

    As for the GM touch, who ELSE writes like this?

    Ends on a cliffhanger, with Hal trapped inside his ring, with a leprechaun who may or may not be a fifth dimensional imp.. All

    THE Green Lantern by THE Grant Morrison.

    Real emphasis on Hal as a space cop.

    The art and the story both want to comprise all SF and fantasy from Flash Gordon through Wally Wood's Weird Science, Frazetta's Vampirella, down to Ethan Van Sciver and XO Manowar.

    For example, here's a splash page which looks like it's from 1929:

    As for the GM touch, who ELSE writes like this?

    Ends on a cliffhanger, with Hal trapped inside his ring, with a leprechaun who may or may not be a fifth dimensional imp.. All right, let's face it, he totally is a fifth dimensional imp.

    eta: I re-read this one more time before my Hoopla loan was up, and some of the obscure things from the first reading were clearer the second time.

  • Robert

    Hal Jordan, S P A C E C O P ! ! !

    Seriously, that's the deal.

    And, oh yeah, bonkers Morrison-ry like this:

  • Lashaan Balasingam (Bookidote)

    .

    What would you do if your imagination was allowed to take over and write a story with nothing restricting you from exploring the darkest corners of the universe? Within the Green Lantern Corps, the heroes go up against all kinds of ill-intentioned beings but remain bound by rules that assure the safety of the galaxy and their own sanity. At the heart of it are Green Lanterns with various backgrounds and unique personalities who face countless

    .

    What would you do if your imagination was allowed to take over and write a story with nothing restricting you from exploring the darkest corners of the universe? Within the Green Lantern Corps, the heroes go up against all kinds of ill-intentioned beings but remain bound by rules that assure the safety of the galaxy and their own sanity. At the heart of it are Green Lanterns with various backgrounds and unique personalities who face countless dilemmas, often very complex and difficult to solve. After so many years, legendary writer Grant Morrison, with the help of artist Liam Sharp, explore the Green Lantern’s universe to present fans with an authentic new series that draws upon the character’s rich history while focusing on the Corps’ space investigative duties.

    What is The Green Lantern: Intergalactic Lawman about? Collecting The Green Lantern #1-6, writer Grant Morrison revisits the Emerald Crusader’s lore by focusing on his role as a space cop within the DC universe. Upon learning the existence of a traitor within the Green Lantern Corps, Green Lantern Hal Jordan channels his inner spy skills to identify the culprit and put an end to the evolving conspiracy before the Corps crumbles at its foundation. While his plate is full with a new villain afoot, parallel problems of epic scale surge into his sector, including the disappearance of Earth. It is only by breaking the law that the space cop can find a way to save the world from its demise and it is a decision that no Lantern has ever had to make before.

    There’s nothing simple with writer Grant Morrison. His ideas are larger than life and often metaphysical in nature. He doesn’t content himself with anything that has already been done and always does his research before giving his heroes a new mission to take on. In this case, he looks back at the older Green Lantern stories to incorporate and rejuvenate the hero today. Where the story took a big hit is in its verbosity and the lack of cohesion between each sub-plot and each issue. While the artwork helps visualize the spectacular universe in which unfolds writer Grant Morrison’s story, it often feels like the reader is tossed in a melting pot and left to fight their way out of it on their own. The purpose of some of his ideas, while intriguing, are sometimes also dissolved in the grand scheme of things, making it seem like there was too much that wanted to be said in too little space.

    To capture the insanity of Grant Morrison’s mind, artist Liam Sharp tailors an impressive and stunning visual style that couldn’t have been done better. His character designs also do justice to all the disturbing creatures in the galaxy, including some of the most original Green Lantern members that have rarely been seen before—including one who has a continuously erupting volcano as a head. There’s also a strange alien body design that is utilized for any humanoid that works wonderfully with the world in which the Green Lanterns patrol. The panel structure used throughout the story arc is also sporadic, extravagant and unique, allowing the story to take on the signature psychedelic tone that comes with projects with writer Grant Morrison.

    The Green Lantern: Intergalactic Lawman is a hallucinogenic and intergalactic police procedural, slightly too convoluted to allow the plot to seduce the reader as much as the exquisite artwork does.

    Yours truly,

    Lashaan | Blogger and Book Reviewer

    Official blog:

  • Eli

    3.5 stars

    Definitely reminiscent of prog rock like the critic reviews say. Personally not the greatest for me because I'm off and on and Grant Morrison's writing. But there were some really good parts here that I might want to continue reading.

  • Daniel

    This review originally published in

    . Rated 3.25 of 5

    It's not a secret that Green Lantern is one of my favorite superheroes and when I see the opportunity to get an ARC of a GL graphic novel, I'm likely to put in a request. Based on this cover, however, I was really concerned as to how much I was going to like this book. Ah ha ... how quickly I forget not to judge a book by its cover. And yet, isn't cover art on a book intended to help sell a title? Seriously, look at this

    This review originally published in

    . Rated 3.25 of 5

    It's not a secret that Green Lantern is one of my favorite superheroes and when I see the opportunity to get an ARC of a GL graphic novel, I'm likely to put in a request. Based on this cover, however, I was really concerned as to how much I was going to like this book. Ah ha ... how quickly I forget not to judge a book by its cover. And yet, isn't cover art on a book intended to help sell a title? Seriously, look at this image of GL ... muscles on muscles on muscles. Is

    what makes someone a superhero? Even in the graphic novels? There's just nothing about this figure that looks 'real' to me and that betrays a lot of what has always appealed to me about the character.

    But enough about the cover.

    One of the questions I've had regarding these superhero books is how can they manage to keep coming up with stories that will engage and excite when they've completed epic stories that deal with saving entire universes. But author Grant Morrison manages to do just this by bringing Hal Jordan/Green Lantern back to his roots. There's a conspiracy going on and it looks like there may be a traitor within the Green Lantern Corps.

    Hal has to go to the rescue of planet Earth, which has gone missing and is found, up for auction. The buyer, who greatly resembles the Christian god as popularly imagined, may have an iron-clad contract on his purchase. Space cop Hal Jordan must get it all squared away in order to save humanity (again).

    The story is pretty basically a detective story, which makes sense when you figure that the Green Lantern Corps are essentially a galactic police force. As a detective story with a superhero protagonist, this works just fine.

    The art here really helps make this story interesting. Artist Liam Sharp works some magic with inventiveness and whimsy. Morrison writes in a number of unusual aliens and Sharp seems to have a field day with it.

    I seriously thought that there were multiple artists at work on the series. Some of the art was quite 'simple' - with just a figure or two in the panel and a little bit of background to add depth. Other pages had panels packed with miscellany - scads of items all over the panel. I truly thought that this reflected the styles or different artists at work but as I paged back through to see who these artists were, I was surprised to find only Sharp's name.

    There's nothing earth-shattering here (pun intended), but I enjoyed the read as a little diversion from some of the weightier books I've been reading lately.

    Looking for a good book?

    is a decent addition to the Green Lantern series with some very nice artwork.

    I received a digital copy of this book from the publisher, through Netgalley, in exchange for an honest review.

  • Artemy

    For a Green Lantern book written by Grant Morrison, this was kind of... not good. I was insanely excited when the book was first announced, I loved the first issue to bits, but every other issue that came out after just got worse and worse. The plot is convoluted and not very interesting, Morrison's writing is unusually verbose (perhaps because he has to tap into a lot of boring DC cosmic mythology) and Hal Jordan is still a dick of a protagonist. Liam Sharp's artwork is the only saving grace,

    For a Green Lantern book written by Grant Morrison, this was kind of... not good. I was insanely excited when the book was first announced, I loved the first issue to bits, but every other issue that came out after just got worse and worse. The plot is convoluted and not very interesting, Morrison's writing is unusually verbose (perhaps because he has to tap into a lot of boring DC cosmic mythology) and Hal Jordan is still a dick of a protagonist. Liam Sharp's artwork is the only saving grace, his realisation of Morrison's cosmic weirdness is absolutely jaw-dropping. Still, the overall result is incredibly underwhelming, especially coming from Grant Morrison. The whole book just doesn't feel like he cares about it very much.

  • Sam Quixote

    Grant Morrison writing Green Lantern is, on paper, a perfect match. His enormously inventive storytelling coupled with an unlimited array of alien characters and a protagonist with a magic ring that can do anything? It should be a home run. Except it’s not, unfortunately.

    Green Lanterns are basically space cops and Morrison plumps for a cliched cop story for his opening arc: there’s a rat in the Corps and it’s up to Hal Jordan to find out who it is. All that means is he arrests some punkass

    Grant Morrison writing Green Lantern is, on paper, a perfect match. His enormously inventive storytelling coupled with an unlimited array of alien characters and a protagonist with a magic ring that can do anything? It should be a home run. Except it’s not, unfortunately.

    Green Lanterns are basically space cops and Morrison plumps for a cliched cop story for his opening arc: there’s a rat in the Corps and it’s up to Hal Jordan to find out who it is. All that means is he arrests some punkass aliens, does the good cop/bad cop interrogation thing, and gets accepted into a gang of criminals – none of which is interesting.

    Hal fighting a giant hamster and spider, Earth being auctioned off by aliens and an Old Testament God-like evil alien are all surprisingly boring and irritatingly stupid. The story moves sluggishly thanks to a lot of overwriting and an unnecessarily complicated structure (an Anti-Matter Lantern?).

    Morrison does include some amusingly wacky Lanterns like the Lantern with a constantly exploding volcano head and a cyclops with a forest for hair! I also liked the microscopic virus Lantern and the indescribable Lanterns who police the farthest reaches of the universe – there’s the imagination I expected Morrison to bring. The Adam Strange episode where Hal has to kill Adam to gain acceptance into the cosmic vampire gang was kinda fun though it plays out in a predictably cop-out way.

    The only really great aspect of the book is Liam Sharp’s artwork. Oa looked amazing, as did the Church of Blood – really that whole vampire sequence was fantastic - and I loved the creative character designs for the ridonkulously varied cast.

    It’s a shame that the book is such a bore to read, not least as it’s by such an experienced and talented writer as Grant Morrison. It’s pretty but I doubt that’ll sway many to check out The Green Lantern, Volume 1: Intergalactic Lawman – I wouldn’t.

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