Tidelands

Tidelands

THE BRAND NEW SERIES FROM THE SUNDAY TIMES NUMBER ONE BESTSELLING AUTHOREngland 1648. A dangerous time for a woman to be different . . .Midsummer’s Eve, 1648, and England is in the grip of civil war between renegade King and rebellious Parliament. The struggle reaches every corner of the kingdom, even to the remote Tidelands – the marshy landscape of the south coast. Alino...

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Title:Tidelands
Author:Philippa Gregory
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Edition Language:English

Tidelands Reviews

  • Laura G (lauralovestoread)

    4.5 stars! I have started making my way through Philippa Gregory’s fabulous books, and I was so excited to read her newest series and novel, Tidelands.

    In this story, the reader is taken to 1648 England, in the midst of the Civil War between King and Parliament.

    I loved the research that went into this book, and I’m always amazed at Gregory’s storytelling talent to retell history. I’ve always been a fan of historical fiction, and can only imagine what life for a woman would have been like during t

    4.5 stars! I have started making my way through Philippa Gregory’s fabulous books, and I was so excited to read her newest series and novel, Tidelands.

    In this story, the reader is taken to 1648 England, in the midst of the Civil War between King and Parliament.

    I loved the research that went into this book, and I’m always amazed at Gregory’s storytelling talent to retell history. I’ve always been a fan of historical fiction, and can only imagine what life for a woman would have been like during the 1640’s!

    *Thank you to Atria books for this complimentary copy in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own.

  • eyes.2c

    Satisfying new series set in Cromwell's England.

    I am still recovering from the ending of this, the first in series Fairmile. Set in 1648 at the time of the English Civil War this dramatic tale reeks of authenticity, penned by the masterly hand of Phillipa Gregory.

    The cover is a satisfying reflection of what my mind conjures up as I imagine the novel's geographic description. Tidelands is set on Sealsea Island, off the Wessex Coast. With its shifting sands and dangerous waterways, the community a

    Satisfying new series set in Cromwell's England.

    I am still recovering from the ending of this, the first in series Fairmile. Set in 1648 at the time of the English Civil War this dramatic tale reeks of authenticity, penned by the masterly hand of Phillipa Gregory.

    The cover is a satisfying reflection of what my mind conjures up as I imagine the novel's geographic description. Tidelands is set on Sealsea Island, off the Wessex Coast. With its shifting sands and dangerous waterways, the community and the Island itself reflects the swirl of place and times and becomes so much more. The tide has swung against the rule of Kings. Cromwell's parliament is in charge.

    And into the Tidelands, seeking help for King Charles, comes a young priest, a spy for the royal family and their followers sequestered in France, masquerading as a tutor and known as James Summer.

    Waiting in the churchyard this Midsummer Eve was Alinor Reekie. She "went to the graveyard in case [her husband's] ghost was walking, so that [she'd] know for sure that he was dead... When [she] didn’t see his ghost, [Alinor] knew he must be alive, and was choosing not to come home."

    The two chance upon each other here, on this waning eve, and in that meeting their lives and those of others will change.

    Gregory takes us through these desperate times when Englishmen are at odds and the monarchy is overturned.

    A time when a woman skilled in herbs, must be vigilant and do nothing to have people label her a witch. A woman who seems to be succeeding on her own. Times when a woman without a husband--neither widowed or subject to a husband is a suspicious entity. But when jealousy and fear are present, when surperstitions run rife, then any previous regard for Alinor's kindnesses and skilled treatment doesn't hold sway.

    I was submerged in Alinor's story, the community she dwells in and the wider unrest that will infect them. My heart was heavy as circumstances were wrenched from her control. Love and betrayal it seems go hand in hand, and the meek are definately not inheriting the earth, when rumour, resentment and anger are involved.

    After declaring eternal love for Alinor, it seems James' love cannot stand the tests presented. The gulf between Alinor's sense of right and the devout James' real being, his sense of self and worth, become glaringly obvious.

    A skillfully woven tale set in turbulent times opening up new possibilities.

    An Atria Books ARC via NetGalley

  • Tracey Allen at Carpe Librum

    by Philippa Gregory is my most anticipated new release for 2019 and I was excited to get my hands on it. Set in England 1648, this is a brand new series from one of my favourite historical fiction authors.

    In this new series, Philippa Gregory is going to be tracing generations of the same family through their lives beginning in 17th century England, and following them all the way to Europe and the United States. Spanning more than two centuries, this series will show how regular, everyd

    by Philippa Gregory is my most anticipated new release for 2019 and I was excited to get my hands on it. Set in England 1648, this is a brand new series from one of my favourite historical fiction authors.

    In this new series, Philippa Gregory is going to be tracing generations of the same family through their lives beginning in 17th century England, and following them all the way to Europe and the United States. Spanning more than two centuries, this series will show how regular, everyday women shape history. Hell yes! Called the Fairmile series, it all starts with

    .

    Alinor lives in poverty with her two children, having seemingly been abandoned by her abusive fisherman husband. Struggling to scratch together a living, Alinor is a midwife and uses her skills with herbs to heal the sick and injured in her district. She also works at the nearby mill with her daughter, and earns money where she can.

    Alinor describes how she makes a living on page 27:

    Descended from generations of wise women, Alinor is constantly treading a fine line between healing and helping and being accused of witchcraft by locals who love to gossip. With her husband missing feared drowned, Alinor is in the unenviable position of being neither a widow nor a wife and is forced to take counsel from her brother.

    Set against the backdrop of English Civil War between the Royalists and the Parliamentarians, news of these political issues is slow to reach the mire. Alinor's fortunes begin to change when she aids a young gentleman in hiding even though she suspects he is working to save the King. Meanwhile, Alinor's daughter falls in love with a wealthy farmer's son and they long to be together; despite Alinor having no means to raise a dowry.

    The concept of class and station is a prominent theme in

    , making it seemingly impossible for Alinor or her daughter to marry for love. The lack of rights for women was not a shock, but was still hard to read and the obvious difference between those in poverty and those from wealthy families was clearly apparent. I found this excerpt from the character of James (the young Royalist) on page 189 most revealing:

    I largely came to love Philippa Gregory's writing via her Plantagenet and Tudor novels however she has left the Tudor courts and the wars of the roses behind. Whilst I enjoy reading about monarchs and famous women from history, Gregory is equally able to convincingly write about the everyday lives of regular people in England at the time. Fishermen, farmers, and millers populate the cast of characters in

    and I thoroughly enjoyed learning about the rhythms of their lives and how they eked out a meagre wage. I was also inspired by just how hard Alinor and her daughter work to save for her dowry and their hardships reminded me how fortunate I am.

    There was plenty of foreshadowing going on in the novel though and I just knew something was going to go terribly wrong. Feelings of foreboding permeated the writing and it was almost a relief when events started to take a turn for the worse.

    Knowing this was the first of a series I felt

    had a very fitting ending. It wasn't a cliffhanger but a clear separation preparing the reader for a future direction. I'm definitely eager to follow the Fairmile series and find out what happens next.

    is recommended for readers of historical fiction and fans of Ken Follett will enjoy the beginnings of this generational family saga rooted in English history.

    * Copy courtesy of Simon & Schuster *

  • Linda

    The enemy from without and the enemy from within....

    Philippa Gregory has always left her thumbprint on novels of English castles and royalty. But this one has a particular flavor centering upon Sealsea Island near the tidelands in 1648. We're introduced to Alinor known also as Goody Reekie. Alinor has climbed to the top of the church tower at midnight gazing out to sea for her lost husband, Zachary. Zachary has been missing for almost a year. Neither widow nor wife, Alinor keeps her vigil.

    Alinor

    The enemy from without and the enemy from within....

    Philippa Gregory has always left her thumbprint on novels of English castles and royalty. But this one has a particular flavor centering upon Sealsea Island near the tidelands in 1648. We're introduced to Alinor known also as Goody Reekie. Alinor has climbed to the top of the church tower at midnight gazing out to sea for her lost husband, Zachary. Zachary has been missing for almost a year. Neither widow nor wife, Alinor keeps her vigil.

    Alinor notices that she is not alone. From within the darkness, she hears a man's voice. He tells her that he is Father James and must meet with Sir William Peachey. As an herbalist and a midwife, Alinor is not familiar with the changing times occuring in London where King Charles has fled and Oliver Cromwell has taken control. There is unrest in the countryside with those supporting the king and those who wish him to stand trial. We will come to know this Father James more closely and observe his true colors as Alinor becomes more and more involved in his safety and well-being.

    But at the core of it all is Alinor's solid allegiance to her daughter, Alys, and to her son, Rob. They exist within the hardships of life in the tidelands with work that furrows the brow and coins that rarely touch the palm.

    Long held secrets permeate Tidelands from the wider scope of the English Civil Wars to the personal interactions of parent to child and neighbor to community. Philippa Gregory begins this one with a low simmer and then gradually brings this one to a rapid boil towards the end. The dialogue is true to era and the characters reflect the historical angst. The ending opens the door that will shed a light upon the road of the future for Sealsea Island and its inhabitants. Whether you are a die-hard Philippa Gregory fan or a new one in the making, Tidelands is one novel that will sweep you away.

    I received a copy of Tidelands through NetGalley for an honest review. My thanks to Simon & Schuster (Atria Books) and to Philippa Gregory for the opportunity.

  • Laura

    4.5⭐

    Wheww, can I just say: As a woman, I’m so glad I was born in this age and not the 17th century! Because holy doo doo...we think being a woman is hard today?? It ain’t nothin (comparatively speaking)!! Anyway, other than this new appreciation I have for the time I live in, I also thoroughly enjoyed the history lesson I received from Tidelands.

    It’s set in what was an incredibly tumultuous time for England. The mid 1600s during the English Civil War, when King Charles I & parliament were f

    4.5⭐️

    Wheww, can I just say: As a woman, I’m so glad I was born in this age and not the 17th century! Because holy doo doo...we think being a woman is hard today?? It ain’t nothin (comparatively speaking)!! Anyway, other than this new appreciation I have for the time I live in, I also thoroughly enjoyed the history lesson I received from Tidelands.

    It’s set in what was an incredibly tumultuous time for England. The mid 1600s during the English Civil War, when King Charles I & parliament were fighting each other. Not only that, but ever since Henry VIII’s religious reformation over a century before, the succeeding monarchs had bounced back and forth between Catholicism and Protestantism. So, neighbors were spying on and/or hiding beliefs from neighbors, the upper class and lower classes were worlds apart & all in all, it wasn’t a very open or happy time.

    This novel is the first in a series that is apparently going to follow a family over generations as it goes from rags to riches. This is the rags part for sure and set the foundation for the rest of the series.

    Alinor, a midwife whose abusive, drunkard husband has left her and her two children, taking all her savings with him (which of course is legal because he is the man, so no matter he didn’t earn it, it’s still his...GRRR). This story follows her as she tries to survive as the most impoverished woman on her island; one who can call herself neither wife nor widow, which is worse than either! I really do have a new appreciation for the women whose shoulders I now stand on and what they went through to get us to where we are today. Back in those days, superstition and paranoia ran deep & rampant. Women had absolutely no rights and were treated like baby factories who were there to take care of the men. While not a fun, happy read this is an incredibly informative & captivating start to what is sure to be a fascinating series that I look forward to continuing. I won this book in a Goodreads giveaway.

  • Angela M

    3.5 stars rounded up.

    It’s a hard life for Alinor and her children who live on Sealsea Island, off the south coast of England, the tidelands “neither sea nor shore”. She’s a healer who grows herbs for medicine, delivers babies and works at times for the more well off residents as does her thirteen year old daughter and son. Her husband is missing, yet in 1648, a woman is defined by her husband and she is “not a widow nor a wife”, so when good fortune comes to her son, there are innuendos that she

    3.5 stars rounded up.

    It’s a hard life for Alinor and her children who live on Sealsea Island, off the south coast of England, the tidelands “neither sea nor shore”. She’s a healer who grows herbs for medicine, delivers babies and works at times for the more well off residents as does her thirteen year old daughter and son. Her husband is missing, yet in 1648, a woman is defined by her husband and she is “not a widow nor a wife”, so when good fortune comes to her son, there are innuendos that she conjures up healing with more than the herbs she mixes or worse with curses. This grueling life they live sees no relief until she meets a young priest, and assists him through the mire to finding the place of safety he is seeking. The meeting not only changes her son’s life, but Alinor’s as well in ways she never imagined. Her daughter’s desire to change her fate of the poor life they’ve lived causes more than innuendo of witchcraft for Alinor.

    The first part of the story was slow moving with just way too much detail about her daily work routines and it felt repetitive at times. But then the story came to life as I’ve come to expect from Phillipa Gregory and I became quite engaged . While this is different from the other Gregory books I’ve read in that the main characters here are not the royals we are used to, the political circumstances are part of the story, the English Civil War and she depicts the history as well as she usually does with her research reflected here. While I felt bogged down at first, the ending was more than enough to keep me wondering what will happen to Alinor, and I’ll be eagerly waiting the second book in the series. A captivating story once things got moving so I’ll round up to 4 stars.

    ARC was provided by Atria via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

  • Susan Johnson

    I always look forward to a Philippa Gregory book and this was no exception. It was a slow read for me until the exciting finish but it is the first book of the series and I think Gregory spent a lot of time laying the groundwork. She envisions a long series like the

    so she wanted a good foundation.

    Set in 1648 during the English Civil War, Alinor is a poor woman, and I do mean poor, who is raising her two children after her fisherman husband sailed out one day and never return

    I always look forward to a Philippa Gregory book and this was no exception. It was a slow read for me until the exciting finish but it is the first book of the series and I think Gregory spent a lot of time laying the groundwork. She envisions a long series like the

    so she wanted a good foundation.

    Set in 1648 during the English Civil War, Alinor is a poor woman, and I do mean poor, who is raising her two children after her fisherman husband sailed out one day and never returned. She is in limbo not knowing if her husband is dead or alive. She is a midwife and sells herbs walking a thin line of not being considered a witch. Her daughter, Alys, has her eye set on marrying the son of a local farmer who owns his own land.

    One night Alinor meets James who is going to work for the local Lord. He is full of dangerous secrets including being a spy for King Charles I who is imprisoned by the Parliament. He secures a position for her son, Rob, as a companion for the Lord's son. The change in fortune brings out the gossips in town and the whispers of witch float around.

    As events bring about the wedding of Alys, climatic revelations bring major changes and confrontations for the family. It's a cliff hanger ending nicely setting up Book 2. The history of the times is quite interesting and well researched and I can't wait to see what happens to Alinor next.

  • karen

    NOW AVAILABLE!!!

    philippa gregory is a name i can be counted on to invoke whenever i’m doing any RA spiel bullet-pointing the many different flavors of historical fiction, with her oeuvre representing the well-researched, female-fronted, literary romance-ish bracket.

    i read

    ages ago, and i remember liking it, so when i saw that her new series would focus on 17th century england with a witchcraft angle, well here i came.

    i’m a new england girl who grew up on stories of goody p

    NOW AVAILABLE!!!

    philippa gregory is a name i can be counted on to invoke whenever i’m doing any RA spiel bullet-pointing the many different flavors of historical fiction, with her oeuvre representing the well-researched, female-fronted, literary romance-ish bracket.

    i read

    ages ago, and i remember liking it, so when i saw that her new series would focus on 17th century england with a witchcraft angle, well here i came.

    i’m a new england girl who grew up on stories of goody proctor and giles corey and in undergrad, i took a class with a more global perspective on witchcraft, which turned out to be the perfect “me” kinda class: horrifying AND illuminating. ‘cuz no matter where in the world people cry ‘witch,’ the targets are certain to contain: unmarriageable daughters, infertile or otherwise inconvenient wives, elderly women, unruly women…it makes the victorian practice of offloading these same problematic females into madhouses seem downright benevolent.

    also included in the ‘frequently accused’ category are midwives and any women working in that mysteeeeeerious realm of women’s health.

    which is what we have here. alinor is an herbalist and midwife living in the sussex tidelands—

    where even the ground beneath one’s feet cannot be counted on from one moment to the next. alinor’s ne'er-do-well husband zachary is a fisherman who has not returned from the sea in months; maybe dead, more likely having abandoned alinor and their two children, but definitely leaving her in a precarious position, as indefinable as the tidelands,

    although her situation seems dire—a vulnerable, beautiful woman without a man, on the edge of the world with a young son and a daughter who will be needing a dowry, with only the herbs she can grow and the work she can find—suddenly, she and her children are blessed with the opportunities of individual, upwardly-mobile paths.

    what can account for this good fortune? perhaps…witchcraft? not so fast—first we have to remember that during this time, there’s a whole civil war going on in england and it must be addressed. we’ll come back to this witch business in like 200 pages or so.

    if you’re someone who loves historical fiction for its immersive properties, you will probably dig this. it’s a slow-burner; there’s a lot of ‘here we are in the tidelands, this is life in the tidelands’ (you cannot hear it, but i am singing this to a tune), but it’s an accumulation of everyday things slowly moving towards something, and i was getting impatient for the story to

    me to that something.

    if i hadn’t been promised juicy witchy stuff on the back cover, i would have been less impatient with the pacing. i did appreciate the descriptions of the family’s man v nature struggle; the hardscrabble eking out of life in a terrifically challenging landscape, how stubborn and resourceful you have to be to survive in such an inhospitable climate—those themes always have my full attention.

    maybe i’ve been away from historical fiction for too long, but i didn’t

    this. the middle felt draggy, and some of the characters were a bit one-note; particularly the exhausting mrs. miller and—o no—alinor.

    before you scold—i understand how tenuous her position is. i understand that even on the ever-shifting tidelands, one does not rock boats. i understand that a woman who has seen nothing of the world beyond her little isolated pocket of it; a mother of two with no man to speak for her, in a profession she has to keep emphasizing does

    include 17th century viagra or magical spells, she’s gotta lay a little low and not be seen as shrill or strident or defensive or any of those words we love so much to hear when a reasonable woman responds to chronically unreasonable people. people like that broadly-drawn mrs miller, for example. and i didn’t need her to be anachronistically assertive or ooh-rah empowered, but even a little spark in her interior life would have been welcome. one suppressed eyeroll or clenched fist. an acknowledgment that her public-facing demeanor takes effort. she’s placid as a messiah, turning all the cheeks, and every sentence she speaks is delivered “simply,” “evenly,“ “cooly,“ “steadily,“ “levelly,“ “easily“… it’s an impressive

    of synonyms for an endlessly agreeable person, but it doesn’t give her character much depth. her daughter alys makes up for alinor’s lack of indignation, but as a character, alinor reads psychologically flat.

    my last gripe, i swear, but as far as the ending - it’s so…disruptive. i mean, it depends where the series goes from here, but gregory spent so much time developing this physical location and this social community only to basically erase all that hard work with a JK NOW IT IS THIS, abandonment of everything we’ve been working towards.

    anyway. this historical element is strong, the witch element is brief, the romance element is...present. i will probably keep reading the series, but am hoping the next one is more focused on people losing their minds over witches.

  • Annette

    Set against the English Civil War, between Parliamentarians and Royalists over the governance.

    The Isle of Wight, 1648: The king is imprisoned and rebellious parliament is in power.

    Sussex, 1648: Alinor, living on the tidelands of the Saxon shore, is 27 and already very weary. Now, a widow of the missing fisherman and abusive husband. Her path crosses with a priest in hiding. James believes in the old religion and in restoring king to its rightful place. Alinor helps him to pass the treacherous m

    Set against the English Civil War, between Parliamentarians and Royalists over the governance.

    The Isle of Wight, 1648: The king is imprisoned and rebellious parliament is in power.

    Sussex, 1648: Alinor, living on the tidelands of the Saxon shore, is 27 and already very weary. Now, a widow of the missing fisherman and abusive husband. Her path crosses with a priest in hiding. James believes in the old religion and in restoring king to its rightful place. Alinor helps him to pass the treacherous marsh.

    The vivid portrayal of tidelands makes the beginning of the story very engrossing. Only the people of the SeaIsea Island know how to tread its waters and tides to avoid getting a foot caught by a quick mud and body snatched by waters.

    As the story progresses, there is a suspension of wanting to know where the story goes and what happens between Alinor and James, but the progression of the story is very slow. After a while it catches with you that the story is going hardly anywhere and the front action is Alinor’s feelings for James and vice versa. There are some small twists, but it is not enough to make it an engaging read.

    From the beginning, Alinor’s daughter notices a difference in Alinor, her look (after meeting James) or her looking like she is listening for something (Jame’s footsteps). The daughter inherits the vision from mother, and I understand her abilities, but maybe the presentation of it didn’t make it believable.

    Also, some accusations of Alinor having her kids with a faerie lord. I understand some old-time believes, but this was another thing that was questionable in this story.

    I enjoyed the part with Alinor’s son, who advances from doing menial outdoor work to a meaningful indoor position, thanks to James. He is also good with recognizing herbs and knowing their use, which he inherits after his mom. Alinor, midwife and herbalist, comes from a long line of wise women. And that shows a promising future for him. But his quick advance makes some people suspicious and scheming.

    Nevertheless, for such long story, the plot could be better developed, with more conceivable effects and less mystery of unearthly things.

    I’ve been a huge fan of Philippa Gregory, but at some point I broke away from her books as her concentration is in English court and I wanted to expend my horizons. I was glad to see something different written by her, but this is not her best book.

    @FB/BestHistoricalFiction

  • Figgy

    I've not read any Philippa Gregory before. Not because of any great aversion to her or her stories, but I guess I get caught up in all the sci-fi and action-filled kind of stories coming out, and have yet to get around to reading her... though I had seen at least one of the movies based on her books, and I own several of her books.

    But there are a few things I'm totally obsessed with and will pick up pretty much any book with these themes and give it a chance. This one seems to take place during

    I've not read any Philippa Gregory before. Not because of any great aversion to her or her stories, but I guess I get caught up in all the sci-fi and action-filled kind of stories coming out, and have yet to get around to reading her... though I had seen at least one of the movies based on her books, and I own several of her books.

    But there are a few things I'm totally obsessed with and will pick up pretty much any book with these themes and give it a chance. This one seems to take place during the time of witch-hunts, and alludes to the main character being "suspected of possessing dark secrets in superstitious times", so I'm in, and will be giving it a shot. And, being by Philippa Gregory, I'm sure it will be well done and I'll enjoy it.

    (The other things, if anyone is interested, are clones, bog-bodies, spontaneous human combustion, time travel, space travel, robots, cults, and cryo-sleep.)

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