Child of the Dream (A Memoir of 1963)

Child of the Dream (A Memoir of 1963)

An incredible memoir from Sharon Robinson about one of the most important years of the civil rights movement. In January 1963, Sharon Robinson turns thirteen the night before George Wallace declares on national television "segregation now, segregation tomorrow, segregation forever" in his inauguration speech as governor of Alabama. It is the beginning of a year that will c...

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Title:Child of the Dream (A Memoir of 1963)
Author:Sharon Robinson
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Child of the Dream (A Memoir of 1963) Reviews

  • Jules Leigh

    A friend of mine received this ARC edition of this book and allowed me to borrow it!

    This is the book I read in one sitting for the reading rush. I started reading this book at midnight and finished at 3:30 in the morning! I listen to a Motown playlist on Spotify while reading this because, A) Motown is one of my favorite musical genres and B) it completely enhanced the story. Ms. Robinson would be telling about all the music she listened to and then a song by that artist would play. The music

    A friend of mine received this ARC edition of this book and allowed me to borrow it!

    This is the book I read in one sitting for the reading rush. I started reading this book at midnight and finished at 3:30 in the morning! I listen to a Motown playlist on Spotify while reading this because, A) Motown is one of my favorite musical genres and B) it completely enhanced the story. Ms. Robinson would be telling about all the music she listened to and then a song by that artist would play. The music made this book come to life. I do not like reading non-fiction (unless it is historical articles) and this is my first time reading a memoir. I loved hearing Ms. Robinson’s voice on her hardest and most important year of her life, 1963. This book I would say is more for younger readers, not Y.A. I can see this book in its near future on the shelves of an elementary school library. A student picking it up by merely chance and it slowly becoming a young non-fiction classic, such as “I am Malala”. I can also picture this book being read aloud to students to teach them about the Civil Rights movement. I can see this book developing a classic literature stature.

    Child of the Dream will be released on September 3rd of 2019. I cannot wait to see the success and discussion this book will bring.

  • Genevieve

    Thank you to the @kidlitexchange network, publisher @scholasticinc, and #sharonrobinson for sharing the review copy of Child of the Dream: A Memoir of 1963. All opinions are my own.

    How do I even begin to praise this book? It’s not just a book- Sharon Robinson pulls you into her world and shares her 13-year-old-self’s dreams of fitting into her skin and her place in the middle of the Civil Rights Movement. But Sharon Robinson doesn’t just tell her story with facts and dates. She shows the reader

    Thank you to the @kidlitexchange network, publisher @scholasticinc, and #sharonrobinson for sharing the review copy of Child of the Dream: A Memoir of 1963. All opinions are my own.

    How do I even begin to praise this book? It’s not just a book- Sharon Robinson pulls you into her world and shares her 13-year-old-self’s dreams of fitting into her skin and her place in the middle of the Civil Rights Movement. But Sharon Robinson doesn’t just tell her story with facts and dates. She shows the reader her insecurities as a teen, and her grit and determination to find her place in a turbulent world. She also gives the reader insight into the bond between herself and Jackie Robinson- baseball player, activist, and loving father. I especially appreciated that her story centered on the year she turned 13, one of the most important years in Civil Rights Movement, and just as important a year for Sharon herself. I love that this story wasn’t just another story about a famous baseball player (although Jackie a Robinson as baseball player is important!), but that it explored the relationship between Sharon and her father, who supported and encouraged her to fight for what she believed in, and how to figure out where she fit in.

    In 1963, Sharon Robinson turns 13 and her whole world feels different. She doesn’t feel like she fits in at school, and she doesn’t really know who she is anymore. Her father, Jackie Robinson, has retired from baseball and is a prominent activist in the Civil Rights Movement. Her family is navigating things that all families must deal with. And the Civil Rights Movement is being met with opposition, hatred, and violence. All of this spurs Sharon to ask questions about the movement and where she fits in all of it, to get involved, and to figure out where she truly belongs. A beautiful story and so well-written that I had to keep reminding myself it was real. What kept pulling me back to reality were the parallels to our world today- the continued police brutality of African Americans, bombings of black churches, and kids and adults marching and fighting for justice. Definitely recommend purchasing for your classroom library or household when it releases on September 3, 2019!

  • Brina

    On a normal Sunday I spend hours reading but today is the day before a holiday, hardly what I call normal. This will repeat itself two more times before the month is out. That being said, I did find some time to read. Jackie Robinson is one of my American heroes. This year marks the 100th anniversary of his birth, and Major League Baseball has marked the occasion by honoring Jackie and his achievements all year long. I have also honored Jackie accordingly by reading more about the Civil Rights m

    On a normal Sunday I spend hours reading but today is the day before a holiday, hardly what I call normal. This will repeat itself two more times before the month is out. That being said, I did find some time to read. Jackie Robinson is one of my American heroes. This year marks the 100th anniversary of his birth, and Major League Baseball has marked the occasion by honoring Jackie and his achievements all year long. I have also honored Jackie accordingly by reading more about the Civil Rights movement than in years past. I find it appropriate that on the last day of the baseball season that I read a memoir by a member of the Robinson family.

    Sharon Robinson is the only daughter of Jackie and Rachel Robinson. She has gracefully run the Jackie Robinson Foundation for a number of years and has authored a number of books for children of all ages so that future generations can learn about her father and his place in history. Child of the Dream is Sharon’s memoir about 1963, the year she turned thirteen. The year was a watershed moment for the civil rights movement, and Sharon has written her memories about her family’s place within the movement with moving prose appropriate for young audiences. Outsiders often hear about the big names of the movement, but Sharon has focused on how teenagers played a large role as well, something that remains relevant in today’s times.

    Jackie Robinson was a bigger man off of the baseball diamond than he was on it, and he gave African Americans so much hope. Sharon found it hard at times to be his daughter yet found her own way in society. Another baseball season finished, placing Jackie Robinson further in the past. Thanks to this new memoir for young readers, Sharon Robinson has ensured that future generations will not forget how special her father and family are, both on the baseball diamond and in society as a whole.

    *5 stars*

  • Saloni

    Thank you to Scholastic for providing me a copy of this book at BEA 2019 and thank you to Sharon Robinson for signing my copy!

    This book is a memoir of Sharon Robinson's childhood as her father, the famous Jackie Robinson, fought in the Civil Rights movement. While Sharon tells the story well, this book is written largely for elementary/middle-schoolers. It touches on some of the darker themes such as the bombing of churches and the hosing of protesting, but it doesn't have the necessary impact t

    Thank you to Scholastic for providing me a copy of this book at BEA 2019 and thank you to Sharon Robinson for signing my copy!

    This book is a memoir of Sharon Robinson's childhood as her father, the famous Jackie Robinson, fought in the Civil Rights movement. While Sharon tells the story well, this book is written largely for elementary/middle-schoolers. It touches on some of the darker themes such as the bombing of churches and the hosing of protesting, but it doesn't have the necessary impact that I feel a book during the Civil Rights Movement, particularly Martin Luther King Jr.'s speech, should have. I think this book serves as a good foundation to interest kids in history, but it definitely needs to be supplemented as an educational tool.

  • Viral

    Thanks to Scholastic for the ARC at BEA 2019, and to Sharon Robinson for signing my copy!

    This book is Sharon Robinson, the daughter of Jackie Robinson, telling the story of living through 1963 with her family. It's meant for middle schoolers, but I feel the story resonates strongly for all ages. I am grateful that Sharon took the time to show us a different side of her father, a man who wasn't just a great baseball player, but an active participant in the Civil Rights Movement. My only complaint

    Thanks to Scholastic for the ARC at BEA 2019, and to Sharon Robinson for signing my copy!

    This book is Sharon Robinson, the daughter of Jackie Robinson, telling the story of living through 1963 with her family. It's meant for middle schoolers, but I feel the story resonates strongly for all ages. I am grateful that Sharon took the time to show us a different side of her father, a man who wasn't just a great baseball player, but an active participant in the Civil Rights Movement. My only complaint was how the book simplified the goals of the Civil Rights Movement, and made it seem like once they ended legal segregation, the fight would be over and the country would be equal. While the fight to end legal segregation was a tough one that we should be proud to celebrate, it was not the only goal of the organizers. I understand this book is for middle schoolers, but I think it's important to think about the narratives we teach children about the past. When we erase aspects of history to make it seem like there is a continuous march forward, we prevent people from understand the work that still needs to be done. It is still a great book for middle grade kids, with Sharon showing how a kid who just wants to worry about playing with her friends and having fun learns about the dark forces of reaction her race has been battling with for generations. Overall, reccommend for middle grade students, with the caveat that all of them need to be required to Google the Freedom Budget and read Ella Baker's Wikipedia page afterwards.

  • Danielle Masterson

    Thank you to the publisher and Edelweiss for this eARC. Spending the year with Sharon Robinson is a delight, even as she struggles to find her spot in the civil rights movement. The writing is simple, putting you in the mind of a 13-year-old. Seeing Jackie Robinson at home, through the eyes of his daughter, was my favorite part of this memoir.

  • Maura

    A front-row view of pivotal moments in the Civil Rights movement written by the daughter of Jackie Robinson for a middle grade audience,

    focuses on Sharon Robinson's adolescence in 1963, combining the relatable struggles of junior high (first dance, first kiss) with the remarkable, extraordinary experiences of living in a home that hosted a visit from Martin Luther King, Jr. and other world-changing leaders of the Civil Rights movement, most notably, of course, her dad.

    What ma

    A front-row view of pivotal moments in the Civil Rights movement written by the daughter of Jackie Robinson for a middle grade audience,

    focuses on Sharon Robinson's adolescence in 1963, combining the relatable struggles of junior high (first dance, first kiss) with the remarkable, extraordinary experiences of living in a home that hosted a visit from Martin Luther King, Jr. and other world-changing leaders of the Civil Rights movement, most notably, of course, her dad.

    What made this book extraordinarily special to read was that Sharon grew up in Stamford, Connecticut, my hometown. And although I attended Dolan Middle School 20 years after Robinson was a student at Dolan Junior High School, I was fascinated by all of the local history that I was never taught, especially that the Robinson family hosted huge jazz concerts on their property to raise money for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) and NAACP before and after the famous March on Washington. It was also fascinating to learn more about Jackie Robinson the father and Sharon's extraordinary mother and the difficulties that Jackie Jr., especially, faced while growing up in the shadow of his father's athletic and leadership accomplishments.

    The combination of the everyday and the extraordinary made this a fascinating read. The only discordant note was some of the dialogue about civil rights news -- the extensive name dropping and exposition as dialogue often felt unnatural and unlikely conversation between parent and child. This contrasted sharply with the poignant and realistic dialogue with her peers, especially older brother Jackie Jr., whose attention she so desperately craved and whose self-destructive streak was such an understandable source of family stress.

    As a huge baseball fan, I wished for a bit more about baseball, but it was interesting to learn how far Jackie's life had drifted from baseball in retirement and how committed he was to the national Civil Rights movement. All in all, a fascinating and wonderful read for middle grade readers and adults alike.

  • Barbara

    When I first started reading this book by the only daughter of baseball great Jackie Robinson, I was uncertain about how the story would play out. After all, it starts with Sharon on the verge of turning 13 and concerned with a school dance and her horse Diamond. How would any of that play into the civil rights movement topic promised by the book title. I need not have fretted since the author's personal stories and recollections of growing up in Connecticut and being awakened to the political m

    When I first started reading this book by the only daughter of baseball great Jackie Robinson, I was uncertain about how the story would play out. After all, it starts with Sharon on the verge of turning 13 and concerned with a school dance and her horse Diamond. How would any of that play into the civil rights movement topic promised by the book title. I need not have fretted since the author's personal stories and recollections of growing up in Connecticut and being awakened to the political movements around her quickly swept me up and encouraged me to race through the book's pages. Once again, I was reminded that the personal and political are impossible to separate as young Sharon struggles with being one of the few black students at her school and becoming increasingly certain that her male classmates won't ask her to dance. As is the case for most youngsters, Sharon was only vaguely aware of her father's involvement in the civil rights movement, but during the pivotal year of 1963 when the story takes place and she turns 13, her consciousness is raised, and she feels drawn to take action to make a difference. The entire Robinson family marches in the March on Washington and raises money for the movement through jazz concerts held on their property. It is clear that this was a family interested in its legacy and that her father used his fame to good purposes. Sharon, her older brother Jackie, and younger brother David had the unconditional love of both parents, and her mother especially nurtured a love for art and music. There are moments in this book that will make young readers slightly envious since Sharon met many famous individuals, including Stevie Wonder and Martin Luther King, Jr., but there are also passages that speak to the pressures of being the child of someone famous, especially for her brother Jackie. Amid all the involvement in changing the world and dreaming of a brighter, fairer future, the author describes her worries about her looks, boys, and fitting in. I finished the book quite impressed with Sharon Robinson and her family and honored that she shared this very personal glimpse into her life with me and other readers. She even includes songs and dances that were popular during that time, adding an important note of authenticity by doing so. Readers will also love the photographs that have been included in the book. I won't be the only one that hopes she continues to chronicle later years in her life. After all, it's important to understand how to nurture a social activist.

  • Ms. Yingling

    E ARC provided by Edelweiss Plus

    In this fiction-style memoir, Robinson recounts the personal and world events that occurred when she turned 13 in 1963. Sharon's father, baseball player Jackie Robinson, was hospitalized for a leg injury that became infected and worsened due to his diabetes, her older brother is having difficulties and runs away from home, and has to come to terms with the growing racial tensions in the US and how they affect her. This is especially important when George Wallace d

    E ARC provided by Edelweiss Plus

    In this fiction-style memoir, Robinson recounts the personal and world events that occurred when she turned 13 in 1963. Sharon's father, baseball player Jackie Robinson, was hospitalized for a leg injury that became infected and worsened due to his diabetes, her older brother is having difficulties and runs away from home, and has to come to terms with the growing racial tensions in the US and how they affect her. This is especially important when George Wallace declares "Segregation forever!" and her father gets involved in various marches and demonstrations. Sharon starts to examine her own life, which is vastly different from the situations African Americans were facing in the South. Her family lives in a predominately white community, and she may even be bused to a mainly black school as part of local desegregation plans! She does have one African American friend, Candy, and she attends a local Jack and Jill social hour, where she gets more information about Civil Rights movement activities as well. This book also offers a glimpse of the Robinson's family life, with Sharon riding her horse, learning to knit and baking with her grandmother, and dealing with Jackie, Jr.'s behavior. There is a nice selection of family photographs as well. She wants to do more to help, and is inspired by the Children's March in the spring of 1963 and was present at Dr. Martin Luther King 's "I Have a Dream" speech in August of that year.

    Strengths: As many times as classes have listened to the "I Have a Dream" speech, students are bound to be fascinated by a first hand account! What it was like to be there, and to be at so many pivotal moments in the Civil Rights movement in "front row seats" because of her father... wow. Like Shabazz's Betty Before X or English's It All Comes Down to This, it's great to have a book that covers first hand details of what it was like to be a teenager at this point in history. It wasn't all just Important Historical Events, either: I loved the details of the horse riding and reading of Marguerite Henry! And of course, the close up view of Jackie Robinson is touching and fascinating-- I didn't know that he became an executive in the Chock Full o' Nuts coffee company! (Which still exists. Who knew?)

    Weaknesses: Some of the conversation is oddly stilted, which surprised me. Perhaps it's harder to write based on personal experiences. Slam Dunk and Safe at Home are still books that are popular with my readers, and I don't remember any similar problems in The Hero Two Doors Down. Also, this was an ARC, so maybe things will be tweaked.

    What I really think: I love memoirs and biographies and wish that my students would read more of them. This is an excellent one to hand to students who are reluctant to pick up memoirs, since it reads much like a novel. It will also be perfect for the Civil Rights and Decades projects that are frequently assigned by language arts teachers.

  • Cindy Mitchell *Kiss the Book*

    Child of the Dream: A Memoir of 1963 by Sharon Robinson, 240 pages. NONFICTION. Scholastic Press, SEPTEMBER 2019. $17.

    Language: G (0 swears, 0 ‘f’); Mature Content: G; Violence: PG (mentions of police violence);

    BUYING ADVISORY: EL - OPTIONAL

    AUDIENCE APPEAL: LOW

    Sharon Robinson recounts the year 1963 as the daughter of baseball player Jackie Robinson and a black young lady during the Civil Rights Movement.

    It says right in the title that this is a memoir, but Robinson’s narrative non-fiction style

    Child of the Dream: A Memoir of 1963 by Sharon Robinson, 240 pages. NONFICTION. Scholastic Press, SEPTEMBER 2019. $17.

    Language: G (0 swears, 0 ‘f’); Mature Content: G; Violence: PG (mentions of police violence);

    BUYING ADVISORY: EL - OPTIONAL

    AUDIENCE APPEAL: LOW

    Sharon Robinson recounts the year 1963 as the daughter of baseball player Jackie Robinson and a black young lady during the Civil Rights Movement.

    It says right in the title that this is a memoir, but Robinson’s narrative non-fiction style becomes stilted whenever she tries to weave more detailed facts about the Civil Rights Movement within the narrative, which is very jarring. There are lots of interesting details – watching history through the eyes adjacent to someone famous, but Robinson has not reached her normal high quality of writing.

    Cindy, Middle School Librarian, MLS

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