The Outlaw Ocean: Journeys Across the Last Untamed Frontier

The Outlaw Ocean: Journeys Across the Last Untamed Frontier

"A riveting, terrifying, thrilling story of a netherworld that few people know about, and fewer will ever see.... The soul of this book is as wild as the ocean itself."--Susan Casey, best-selling author of The Wave: In Pursuit of the Rogues, Freaks, and Giants of the Ocean A riveting, adrenaline-fueled tour of a vast, lawless and rampantly criminal world that few have ever...

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Title:The Outlaw Ocean: Journeys Across the Last Untamed Frontier
Author:Ian Urbina
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The Outlaw Ocean: Journeys Across the Last Untamed Frontier Reviews

  • Amanda

    I received this book via a Goodreads giveaway, hosted by the publisher. Thank you!

    This book was great -- it was primarily very readable in style, and its content shocking, engrossing, and thoroughly researched. The author's adventures as a journalist are totally unlike any experiences I've ever had and I can't believe journalists do so much to share just fractions of those experiences. This is a book about crime and law enforcement on parts of the globe that most people will never go to, but dem

    I received this book via a Goodreads giveaway, hosted by the publisher. Thank you!

    This book was great -- it was primarily very readable in style, and its content shocking, engrossing, and thoroughly researched. The author's adventures as a journalist are totally unlike any experiences I've ever had and I can't believe journalists do so much to share just fractions of those experiences. This is a book about crime and law enforcement on parts of the globe that most people will never go to, but demonstrates enormous problems at the highest levels: human rights violations, ecology, child labor, climate change, weapons and war. The value of human life stands out the strongest for me. I probably contribute to these problems too (cat food! Seafood! Overseas production!) so the appendix gives some useful resources for lessening one's impact and contributing to solutions.

    Don't be afraid of this book's length, as the notes portion occupies a significant chunk, and there are lots of images within each manageable, action-packed chapter.

  • Jenny Javier

    I have been looking forward to reading this book soon as I saw it announced. I have read several chapters (not necessarily in order) and am so blown away with the scope, the writing, and the whole production that took to get all of these stories written. Why is this topic and this book not a bigger deal? I have been recommending it to friends right and left and hoping that it gets the attention it so rightfully deserves. If you wish to know more about where the fish on your plate comes from, the

    I have been looking forward to reading this book soon as I saw it announced. I have read several chapters (not necessarily in order) and am so blown away with the scope, the writing, and the whole production that took to get all of these stories written. Why is this topic and this book not a bigger deal? I have been recommending it to friends right and left and hoping that it gets the attention it so rightfully deserves. If you wish to know more about where the fish on your plate comes from, the overfishing that happens all over the world, the haplessness against human trafficking/slavery on the high seas (just to list a few), this book is a must-read.

  • Jean-Marie

    A confession: except for family vacations, big bodies of water hold no interest for me, nor do looming environmental disasters, since there seem to be enough of these on land. I bought The Outlaw Ocean because in a print world dominated by bad news, fake news, and journalists who increasingly write more about feelings than fact, Outlaw Ocean seemed different. And it is.

    Ian Urbina has written an exemplary book, up there with Diane McWhorter’s Carry Me Home and Patrick Radden Keefe’s Say Nothing

    A confession: except for family vacations, big bodies of water hold no interest for me, nor do looming environmental disasters, since there seem to be enough of these on land. I bought The Outlaw Ocean because in a print world dominated by bad news, fake news, and journalists who increasingly write more about feelings than fact, Outlaw Ocean seemed different. And it is.

    Ian Urbina has written an exemplary book, up there with Diane McWhorter’s Carry Me Home and Patrick Radden Keefe’s Say Nothing for his ability to seamlessly thread solid stories, great yarns, with data, facts, footnotes, and “digressions,” as Urbina calls them. Urbina’s bona fides as an investigative reporter are sealed in Outlaw Ocean, as is his guts in doing what he did, which cozies up to the almost insane. Outlaw Ocean makes you feel like you are on the boat, lurching forward, or perilously sideways, and although Urbina is very much part of that story, there is no ego in the telling. Although the book has a compelling section of color photos, what I found even more enjoyable, and enlightening, were the candid shots, drawings, and diagrams interspersed with the text that were compelling all on their own.

    A spectacular book.

  • SarahJessica

    Exceptional investigative journalism that does not succumb to beat narratives or glib solutions. Let this collection trouble your concepts of what separates humans from nature, what is presence and what is void, and how we govern or don't govern ourselves in the presence of so much nothingness. Truly a great read.

  • Daniel Thomas

    This is the first nonfiction book I've read in a year. In The Age of Trump, I've wanted to unplug and immerse myself in fiction. Urbina has done a spectacular job of reporting on all the myriad ways that governments and individuals use the international waters to skirt the law; everything from human trafficking, illegal fishing, drugs, financial malfeasance.

    The book isn't a dry recitation of facts, but goes up close and in-depth to report on the human drama at play on the high seas. This book d

    This is the first nonfiction book I've read in a year. In The Age of Trump, I've wanted to unplug and immerse myself in fiction. Urbina has done a spectacular job of reporting on all the myriad ways that governments and individuals use the international waters to skirt the law; everything from human trafficking, illegal fishing, drugs, financial malfeasance.

    The book isn't a dry recitation of facts, but goes up close and in-depth to report on the human drama at play on the high seas. This book deserves the Pullizer Prize.

  • Onceinabluemoon

    I am giving this 4 stars even though dnf, it’s well written, I just can’t bear the topic... so depressing it’s breakjng my soul... I have been listening all day in the garden, the sun is setting with this warm orange glow and I am listening to another horrendous murder and mutalation... I am out, I read to learn and enjoy, this topic is just too heart breakjng, I Quit 😟

  • Bob Peru

    good investigative reporting.

  • Scott Martin

    (Audiobook) This work explores some of the darker aspects of how human act as they sail and make use of the oceans. As Urbina continues to discuss all the adventures and experiences he had in the creation of this work, it is clear that life on the ocean is as tough as it was in the past. Even with all the technologies and advances in navigation and safety...life on the seas is still tough. It is also a cutthroat business, one that takes advantage of the lowest rungs of the economic ladder, parti

    (Audiobook) This work explores some of the darker aspects of how human act as they sail and make use of the oceans. As Urbina continues to discuss all the adventures and experiences he had in the creation of this work, it is clear that life on the ocean is as tough as it was in the past. Even with all the technologies and advances in navigation and safety...life on the seas is still tough. It is also a cutthroat business, one that takes advantage of the lowest rungs of the economic ladder, particularly in South and East Asia, which supplies much of the labor for the various fishing/cargo/smuggling ships. It is also incredibly difficult to police, with law enforcement still a difficult challenge for the nations of the world.

    There is much adventure and Urbina finds himself in so many different situations across the world. Many take place in parts of the world few ever see (the South Atlantic, Pacific, Indian and Antarctic water). Yet, there is just as much boredom and lack of adventure. In many ways, the seas remain the same. The reader does a good job with the audiobook. The rating is the same. Overall, worth the time to read/listen.

  • PWRL

    O

  • Jim Gleason

    This series of Times reporter first-had life experiences tracking down the stories of maritime atrocities, sometimes legal, most times illegal, was most interesting to read. Each chapter a well-documented narrative about some aspect of ocean-going human suffering and/or fish tragedy made possible by the seemingly unimaginable yet true account of how our ocean life is being destroyed with the use of modern technology. Driven by both poverty and huge profits, each story was captivating in its huma

    This series of Times reporter first-had life experiences tracking down the stories of maritime atrocities, sometimes legal, most times illegal, was most interesting to read. Each chapter a well-documented narrative about some aspect of ocean-going human suffering and/or fish tragedy made possible by the seemingly unimaginable yet true account of how our ocean life is being destroyed with the use of modern technology. Driven by both poverty and huge profits, each story was captivating in its humanness - both in lives lost or tragically damaged by the daily practices that imprison the impoverished of small countries trying to make a living only to have their lives trashed like the many fish they work with daily that are tossed overboard. As you read this be prepared to be horrified by what you will learn and to be chastised for supporting this fishing industry with our daily dining while ignoring abuses that make our dinner plates possible. I doubt you will ever look at a dinner plate of fish the same ever again, so don't say I didn't warn you here.

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