A Stone Sat Still

A Stone Sat Still

The follow-up to They All Saw a CatA Stone Sat Still tells the story of a seemingly ordinary rock—but to the animals that use it, it is a resting place, a kitchen, a safe haven...even an entire world....

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Title:A Stone Sat Still
Author:Brendan Wenzel
Rating:
Edition Language:English

A Stone Sat Still Reviews

  • Laura Harrison

    A Stone Sat Still by Brendan Wenzel is my favorite picture book of the year. I have been waiting so long for the release of this book! It is described as a companion to his remarkable Caldecott award winning, They All Saw A Cat. It was definitely worth the wait! Every illustration is a wonder that needs to be enjoyed and studied. It is a quiet, contemplative, timely, beautiful book. So hard to believe this is only Brendan Wenzel's eighth book. I consider him a picture book great. His work is as

    A Stone Sat Still by Brendan Wenzel is my favorite picture book of the year. I have been waiting so long for the release of this book! It is described as a companion to his remarkable Caldecott award winning, They All Saw A Cat. It was definitely worth the wait! Every illustration is a wonder that needs to be enjoyed and studied. It is a quiet, contemplative, timely, beautiful book. So hard to believe this is only Brendan Wenzel's eighth book. I consider him a picture book great. His work is as wonderful as masters such as Lane Smith, Kevin Henkes, Jerry Pinkney, Sophie Blackall and Eric Carle. A Stone Sat Still is absolutely Caldecott worthy. It deserves the Caldecott gold. It is just that good. I can't wait to see what Brendan Wenzel creates next! Btw, if you are in the NY area-check out Brendan Wenzel's illustrations/murals etc. at The Children's Zoo (Bronx Zoo). They are phenomenal!

  • Danielle

    Holy moly.

  • Amy!

    So lovely. I loved Wenzel's

    , and I think this one is as good, if not better. The text is so warm and soothing, and the illustrations are incredible. His use of a variety of mediums works really well to tell this story of a stone and all the different perspectives the creatures that interact with it have. I particularly love the cut paper porcupine.

  • Barbara

    Like many other readers, I adored They All Saw a Cat and Hello Hello, this author/illustrator's previous two picture books. His latest offering only serves to add to my admiration for him and his work. As he has done in the previous two books, he explores perspective, this time focusing on a stone. It's clear that this rock has been around for a long time, and various animals use it as a landing place, a spot on which to eat or perch or crack a shell to reveal a meal. For some of it, it's quite

    Like many other readers, I adored They All Saw a Cat and Hello Hello, this author/illustrator's previous two picture books. His latest offering only serves to add to my admiration for him and his work. As he has done in the previous two books, he explores perspective, this time focusing on a stone. It's clear that this rock has been around for a long time, and various animals use it as a landing place, a spot on which to eat or perch or crack a shell to reveal a meal. For some of it, it's quite large, but for others, they are almost overwhelmed by its enormity. Again, it all depends on their perspective and size. But as this meditation moves to its conclusion, it seems to shift slightly so that readers are invited to think about what a stone like this or a place like this might mean to them, perhaps a place of shared joy with family members or a spot for solitary contemplation. For me, it's hard not to consider the strong environmental message present in the text and illustrations and consider what will be left after we are all gone--perhaps only that stone and others like it. As its creator clearly intended, I was left contemplating nature's beauty and pondering the effects of humans on the environment and wondering just how much time we have left to repair the wounds we've inflicted on Mother Earth. Created with cut paper, colored pencil, oil pastels, marker, and the computer, the illustrations warrant closer examination, and the text will surely invite discussion. This is a gentle yet insistent picture book that makes readers think. I loved it, and it stands up to repeated readings.

  • La Coccinelle

    I read

    earlier this year. I have to say, that one was just okay for me. I think I enjoyed

    a lot more.

    Both books are about different perspectives, but they approach the topic in slightly different ways.

    shows how various creatures see the cat that's prowling through the scenes.

    is more about how the stone--a steady constant--influences the lives of the various creatures that encounter it.

    The pictures are interesting, though not quite as fascinating as

    I read

    earlier this year. I have to say, that one was just okay for me. I think I enjoyed

    a lot more.

    Both books are about different perspectives, but they approach the topic in slightly different ways.

    shows how various creatures see the cat that's prowling through the scenes.

    is more about how the stone--a steady constant--influences the lives of the various creatures that encounter it.

    The pictures are interesting, though not quite as fascinating as in

    . The tone gets a little heavy toward the end, too, with the environmental message. But I still think it's a worthwhile book to read, as it shows how one thing can be perceived and used in so many different ways.

  • Abigail

    Described on the dust-jacket flap as a companion to author/illustrator Brendan Wenzel's Caldecott Honor-winning

    , this new picture-book also explores perspective. Centering around the eponymous stone, the narrative here explores the stone's existence - the many uses it serves to various creatures in the wild, and the various positions it holds, depending upon the size and outlook of the being examining it. In the end, the stone sits and endures, while everything around it change

    Described on the dust-jacket flap as a companion to author/illustrator Brendan Wenzel's Caldecott Honor-winning

    , this new picture-book also explores perspective. Centering around the eponymous stone, the narrative here explores the stone's existence - the many uses it serves to various creatures in the wild, and the various positions it holds, depending upon the size and outlook of the being examining it. In the end, the stone sits and endures, while everything around it changes...

    The third picture-book that Wenzel has both written and illustrated, and the eighth he has worked on overall,

    pairs a simple but thought-provoking text that emphasizes the stone's many roles in the world it inhabits with gorgeous multi-media artwork. I don't know that this one struck me quite as strongly as

    , but there was something about it - perhaps a feeling of quietude, similar to what one feels when sitting still, out in the natural world? - that makes it very appealing. Recommended to fellow fans of Brendan Wenzel, and to anyone looking for lovely new picture-books about perspective and/or nature.

  • Lisa Vegan

    This title greatly appealed to me and I was expecting a meditative experience and it did sort of provide it for me. I do like how it shows perspective via how all sorts of creatures view and use the same stone in different ways. The stone remains stable, a constant, in an always changing and diverse world. I appreciated the concept. And the illustrations and gorgeous and huge and striking.

    I think I enjoyed the author/illustrator’s They All Saw A Cat book more than this one. It’s very similar in

    This title greatly appealed to me and I was expecting a meditative experience and it did sort of provide it for me. I do like how it shows perspective via how all sorts of creatures view and use the same stone in different ways. The stone remains stable, a constant, in an always changing and diverse world. I appreciated the concept. And the illustrations and gorgeous and huge and striking.

    I think I enjoyed the author/illustrator’s They All Saw A Cat book more than this one. It’s very similar in what it presents. I didn’t really like the interactive line near the end “Have you ever known such a place?” though some children/other readers might appreciate it. I did like most of the rest of the spare text.

    3-1/2 stars

  • Reading Tam Ishly

    I simply loved this book because it has the potential for different perspectives of how and when we read it. It will be different for the children. They will enjoy the illustrations and the various animals and flora depicted in relation to the stone. And as for adults, I feel this book describes a home to me, a home in my own being. We as adults face different people of all kinds and get caught up in certain unavoidable life circumstances. I read this one hoping that I would enjoy the illustrati

    I simply loved this book because it has the potential for different perspectives of how and when we read it. It will be different for the children. They will enjoy the illustrations and the various animals and flora depicted in relation to the stone. And as for adults, I feel this book describes a home to me, a home in my own being. We as adults face different people of all kinds and get caught up in certain unavoidable life circumstances. I read this one hoping that I would enjoy the illustrations and wanted to catch up with my childhood days. But I reaped more than what I had intended for.

    I felt this book was really short. And so incomplete. I feel like a later half is coming up. But it just ended like I was enjoying all the party music but waiting for the slow dance moment which never came.

  • Brindi Michele

    I liked it, but it was a tad too long. Great for programs/storytimes for thinking outside the box of what things can be...such as the book

    or the one about a stick (the title is escaping me right now!).

  • Abby Johnson

    WOW! With gorgeous, muted, sometimes a little abstract artwork and a gentle, rhythmic, evocative text, this picture book presents a stone. Depending on the time of year or which animals are near, the stone can be different things: a pebble to a moose, a hill to a bug, etc. But the stone is also always itself, sitting where it sits as everything changes all around it. This is a great book to share ideas about perspective and how it changes and also mindfulness and seeing the possibilities in thin

    WOW! With gorgeous, muted, sometimes a little abstract artwork and a gentle, rhythmic, evocative text, this picture book presents a stone. Depending on the time of year or which animals are near, the stone can be different things: a pebble to a moose, a hill to a bug, etc. But the stone is also always itself, sitting where it sits as everything changes all around it. This is a great book to share ideas about perspective and how it changes and also mindfulness and seeing the possibilities in things. Pair with IF I WAS THE SUNSHINE for a philosophical reading session.

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