The Ten Thousand Doors of January

The Ten Thousand Doors of January

In the early 1900s, a young woman embarks on a fantastical journey of self-discovery after finding a mysterious book in this captivating and lyrical debut.In a sprawling mansion filled with peculiar treasures, January Scaller is a curiosity herself. As the ward of the wealthy Mr. Locke, she feels little different from the artifacts that decorate the halls: carefully mai...

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Title:The Ten Thousand Doors of January
Author:Alix E. Harrow
Rating:
Edition Language:English

The Ten Thousand Doors of January Reviews

  • Chaima ✨ شيماء

    I almost didn’t write this review.

    I felt that to speak of this book would be to contain what it did to

    , to diminish it somehow. And I didn’t want to do that. 

    is almost less a novel than an experience: never have I felt more like I was part of things, moved by the same current, like my soul had disconnected from my body and drifted among fictional souls in a mist somewhere between fantasy and reality.

    It seemed hardly credible when I finished reading that I couldn’tthat. The

    I almost didn’t write this review.

    I felt that to speak of this book would be to contain what it did to

    , to diminish it somehow. And I didn’t want to do that. 

    is almost less a novel than an experience: never have I felt more like I was part of things, moved by the same current, like my soul had disconnected from my body and drifted among fictional souls in a mist somewhere between fantasy and reality.

    It seemed hardly credible when I finished reading that I couldn’t follow the words back to a world where this wasn’t mere fiction. Of course the sensible part of me informed me, patiently, that none of it had any more bearing on real life than a dream, yet in the surreal fuzziness of the night, I felt—on a bone-deep, irrational, completely unshakable level—the possibility that I might turn a key, open a door and unlock the mysteries of the world. Even the morning’s clarity couldn’t snatch that away.

    You see—to read

    is to fill your whole life with it. Those minutes—

    that my gaze was connected to the page, were the only moments in my day that I felt anything at all. Which is why I feel that to share this account, or give anything away, would do a disservice to a reader just coming to this novel, but suffice it to say this:

    The rush of turning a page and a story beginning.

    But that isn’t the true beginning of this story. Perhaps it is more apt to say that

    . (Really, though. Semantics.)

    January Scaller grew up uneasily lodged with the immensely wealthy Cornelius Locke, her childhood a half-painted picture without her father in it while he disappeared for days, months, to buy off with Locke’s gold coins—more often,

    —marvels and oddities that emerged every day from rumors and fables carried by travelers across oceans and deserts to fire the imaginations of rich folk around the world. For years, January was as molten glass in Locke’s hands, to be spun into the (dutiful, docile,

    ) shape he liked, and with the pall of every goodbye, what once used to be fluent between January and her father soon became incomprehensible, and far more difficult to translate. Now consumed by a sense of dreary imprisonment within Locke’s sprawling mansion and suffering an undimmed longing for an absentee father, January’s spirit grew feeble, as though some river within herself had long since dried.

    Until one day, January Scaller stumbles upon a book, and she is suddenly lost and found and wandering, all at once.

    Following the threads of history through its tangle, January reads about locked Doors that opened at your knock if you put enough faith into the turn of your key, about young girls who wished for surprises around each road’s turning and yearned for adventure with a hard, physical longing, like a craving for air underwater, and young boys who could never really step back from brinks no matter how perilous was the drop and whom the world almost no longer held a place (or a Door, for that matter) to hide from. Stories that made January feel that the world went on so much further than she could see, and carried with them the faint scent of—if not freedom, then the coiled charge of its possibility.

    Harrow has written a jewel of a novel that grips readers from the opening sentence, and the author’s gifts as a writer are unmistakable, as keen as an unsheathed blade. She delivers a pleasurably devoured piece of prose, but placed within a novel about people who all have a whiff of the unwanted silently hovering about them, and a forlorn wish for belonging lodged within them, finding each other across worlds guided by nothing but the small, sickly faith they keep between them, she creates a story saturated with so much yearning and ache.

    And even more than the plot, the characters, the astoundingly unique turns of phrase, and the skill with which the author brings the intersecting storylines to a resounding ending that was both healing and fraught with pain, what I loved most about this book—and what I will remember most ardently about it—is the way the author succeeds in giving the desperate earnestness of her storytelling the quality of a

    , so that her words ring as resonantly as aged wood. And although I knew none of it was real, I also knew it wasn’t

    real, and the two knowings drunkenly chased circles in my mind, dizzying me. And therein, I think, lies the book’s biggest triumph: in its ability to convince and compel, to conjure up the indescribable—the

    —through language, to make you

    . To show you a door and hand you a key and invite you to embrace the thrilling and sickening lurch of the drop.

    So, if you ever wondered how it would feel to stand on the threshold of a living dream, I promise this book is your key.

  • karen

    NOW AVAILABLE!!!

    i mean, it’s a perfect book.

    that should be the alpha and the omega of this book review, because you’ve probably already read the synopsis, and if it takes more than that to convince you of this book’s desirability, i’m sure i don’t have the words to do it.

    if you like

    , you will probably enjoy this. obviously, they both involve doorways to other worlds, young(ish) protagonists, and adventure, but their more significant shared characteristics are tonal—haunting and

    NOW AVAILABLE!!!

    i mean, it’s a perfect book.

    that should be the alpha and the omega of this book review, because you’ve probably already read the synopsis, and if it takes more than that to convince you of this book’s desirability, i’m sure i don’t have the words to do it.

    if you like

    , you will probably enjoy this. obviously, they both involve doorways to other worlds, young(ish) protagonists, and adventure, but their more significant shared characteristics are tonal—haunting and yearning and saddish; themes of displacement and otherness and an aching inability to fit into the world, how it feels to be “an in-between sort of thing.”

    it also made me think of

    and

    , with how it handles its themes of fate, family and separation, and in its use of books and letters to carry the narrative. all of these books have given me a very specific and rare kind of sadness-shiver, and i’m always gladdened to encounter another source.

    it is a formidable debut—the concept, the characters, the language; she’s got it all on lock; there’s a richness to her prose that sparkles up off the page and there’s a VERY GOOD DOG named bad. even the romantic subplot, which ordinarily activates my eyeroll-muscles, was perfect and understated and my eyeballs remained unrolled.

    there are enough unfinished edges and unexplored territory that this could easily expand into a second book or series, but i kind of don’t want it to. i definitely want her to write more words for me to read, but the bittersweet ambiguity of the ending is perfect and i want to just close the book and leave them to work the rest out unobserved.

    i mean, it’s a perfect book.

    *****************************

    it's some top-notch book schwag when even the mailing envelope is fancy

    this is the debut novel by the woman who wrote

    , which i LOVED, and is one of those free tor shorts you can read

    while you wait for this book to come out.

    oh, and now MORE! a bookmark handmade by alix e. harrow herself! am i charmed? i AM!

    my TBR stack might just kill me, but i will die happy. and squashed. happy and squashed.

  • Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽

    ETA: On the

    , at the link, there's a truly fascinating and insightful interview with this author, Alix Harrow.

    All the stars! Final review, first posted on

    (along with my co-reviewer Marion's excellent review):

    is perched at the top of the mountain of portal fantasies that I’ve read in my life. It’s set apart by Alix E. Harrow’s intelligent and truly gorgeous writing, unique characters ― including true friends and a fiercely/>The

    ETA: On the

    , at the link, there's a truly fascinating and insightful interview with this author, Alix Harrow.

    All the stars! Final review, first posted on

    (along with my co-reviewer Marion's excellent review):

    is perched at the top of the mountain of portal fantasies that I’ve read in my life. It’s set apart by Alix E. Harrow’s intelligent and truly gorgeous writing, unique characters ― including true friends and a fiercely loyal dog ― and a complex and twisty plot, combined with thoughtful consideration of racial and class prejudice, powerful men who make rules to benefit themselves, and other social issues.

    January Scaller is a young girl in early 20th century America, living in the mansion of Mr. Locke, a wealthy collector of rare and unique items. January’s mother is missing and presumed dead, while January’s father Julian spends months on end traveling the globe in search of Mr. Locke’s rare items. And perhaps, searching for something more. Because January and her father are both aware that there are Doors ― portals to different worlds ― and Julian, a black man, has a particular reason for searching out these Doors.

    Meanwhile, January is being raised by the mysterious Mr. Locke, a man she both loves and fears, though she tries to convince herself that the fear is unreasonable. With her cedarwood-colored skin, January has never entirely fit into the world of wealth and privilege that she inhabits with Mr. Locke. But she has a strong-willed companion, Jane Irimu, sent to her by her father, and a protective dog, Bad (short for Sinbad, and it’s clear that both versions of his name are appropriate … though he’s bad only to the hidebound or evil characters), given to her by her equally loyal friend Samuel.

    Just before her seventeenth birthday, January finds a strange book titled

    that purports to be a monograph on passages and portals between worlds. Primarily, though, it’s about the life and adventures of a young woman named Adelaid Lee Larson (Ade), who finds some Doors of her own.

    And then one day January makes the mistake of mentioning Doors to Mr. Locke …

    I loved Harrow’s meditations on the nature of doors that she weaves into the text: they’re portals, of course, passageways to adventure or love, but also a symbol of healthy change and openness. And occasionally doors are books or even words (“Sometimes I feel that there are doors lurking in the creases of every sentence, with periods for knobs and verbs for hinges.”).

    Characters’ names have power in this book: Mr. Locke is, unsurprisingly, antithetical to open magical doors and passageways; the irimu is a creature of African legend, sometimes called a were-leopard. The unprepossessing name Scaller might be (I conjecture here) derived from “scall,” a scabby disorder of the scalp, or the sculling of a rowboat … or, perhaps, something more that’s initially hidden from both the reader’s and January’s understanding.

    Through January and other characters, Harrow warns of the dangers of being too good, too quiet, and too accepting of the status quo.

    The entire book is an encouragement to take action. If I have any complaint at all, it’s that sometimes the narrator is overtly preachy where I would have preferred a more subtle approach (footnote 6, I’m looking at you). But the overall message, to have the courage to do what needs to be done, and to “run through every open Door and tell stories when you return,” is an overwhelmingly positive one.

    is a magical entry to a wondrous universe. Don’t miss the chance to walk through this doorway!

    Cheers! I finally got the NetGalley ARC for this book! I was beating the bushes on this one because I

    wanted it (I emailed the author and the publisher last week as well as putting in a NetGalley request, which they had ignored for a couple of months. One of those methods finally worked). :)

  • Nilufer Ozmekik

    5 thousand stars first for wonderful, amazing illustration on the cover and five thousand stars go for rest of the heart throbbing, one of the most creative, colorful, joyful journeys to many different imaginary portals you can never imagine to visit!

    FASTEN YOUR SEAT BELT, OPEN YOUR EYES, READY TO COUNT TO 10 THOUSAND!

    This is amazing combination of McGuire’s Wayward Children Series and Stephen King’s Dark Tower series!

    BLURB: Seven years old January’s revelation of finding a door op

    5 thousand stars first for wonderful, amazing illustration on the cover and five thousand stars go for rest of the heart throbbing, one of the most creative, colorful, joyful journeys to many different imaginary portals you can never imagine to visit!

    FASTEN YOUR SEAT BELT, OPEN YOUR EYES, READY TO COUNT TO 10 THOUSAND!

    This is amazing combination of McGuire’s Wayward Children Series and Stephen King’s Dark Tower series!

    BLURB: Seven years old January’s revelation of finding a door opens to Faerie, Atlantis, Valhalla, and the places never found on a map. Of course I’m intrigued and wanted to learn more!

    HEROINE: January is definitely; brave, witty, sarcastic, loyal, gifted, young heroine. It’s enjoyable how she compares herself with regular book heroines with her great sense of humor!

    FAVORITE CHARACTERS: Of course the badass, loyal, brave dog!

    SUPPORTING CHARACTERS: Mr. Locke, blood freezing, teeth grinding, nerve bending villain who deserves to be putted on a dart chart so you can be more concentrated to hit the target!

    Jane is memorable Amazon woman! Straightforward, tough, protector.

    Samuel: sweet, loyal, romantic, impossible not to love and care for!

    And January’s parents and their love story are definitely heartbreaking! I sighed so many times when I’m reading their parts!

    WRITING STYLE: Pacing was not fast but not too slow! It keeps your attention alert and hooked you from the first page, you don’t want to stop, want to learn more and more till your head starts to turn because you passed your sleep time five hours ago and you start to see the sunrise and you realize it’s too late to go to the bed so you’d better finish the book!

    ENDING: When I close a book and see my smile like Cheshire cat cover my face all night, it means I’m so satisfied with the ending. So yes! It’s the best emotional, joyful, smart ending to this unconventional, creative, well-crafted, remarkable story!

    FANTASY LOVERS, GOOD STORY CHASERS, PORTAL TRAVELERS, this book is highly recommended for you!

  • Paromjit

    If there is a part of you that has always felt there is magic in the world ever since childhood, despite voices to the contrary, and have a penchant for the whimsical, then Alix Harrow has written the perfect novel for you. It is a story of doors, portals if you will, existing in places of particular resonance, stepping through the void, into fables, folklore, adventure, love and sanctuary, and the infinite power of words and stories. In 1901, at the age of 7, the red skinned, wilful and cantank

    If there is a part of you that has always felt there is magic in the world ever since childhood, despite voices to the contrary, and have a penchant for the whimsical, then Alix Harrow has written the perfect novel for you. It is a story of doors, portals if you will, existing in places of particular resonance, stepping through the void, into fables, folklore, adventure, love and sanctuary, and the infinite power of words and stories. In 1901, at the age of 7, the red skinned, wilful and cantankerous January Scaller lives with her guardian, the enormously wealthy, white and powerful William Locke on a sprawling estate, in a house crammed full of stolen treasures in his collections, mostly acquired by her black father on his global adventures, occasionally returning, whilst she stays behind in Vermont. January is in Kentucky when she encounters her first door, but Locke does not believe her and she is punished. In her efforts to please him she grows up trying to be a good girl, curbing her natural instincts and desires, to conform to his stringent expectations.

    January is a strange oddity, only tolerated by the outside world riven with racism because she accompanies the man of substance that is Locke, the Chairman of the Archaeological Society, on his business trips. He informs her ' Power, my dear, has a language, a currency....and a color', as she grows up lonely, with only one, below the radar, non-fictional friend, Samuel Zappia, who gives her a beloved dog, (Sin)Bad. Until Jane arrives, a brave and courageous Amazon woman, sent to protect January by her father. A griefstricken and drunk January responds with unpalatable truths to Locke and his much vaunted Archaeological Society, an act which is to shatter the world as she knows it. In the gripping narrative, the lives of Adelaide Larson and Yule Ian (Julian) are outlined culminating in a meeting that triggers adventures, journeys through doors and dedicated scholarly research that results in a remarkable book, The Ten Thousand Doors, which falls in the hands of January, with its shocking revelations. As January is ferociously hunted and facing grave dangers, will she be able to find the inner resources to fight the deadly threats?

    Harrow writes a bewitching story, about powerful underhand forces that are determined to eliminate all threats to the existing political establishment, about family, loss, grief, and a coming of age tale. The characterisation is stellar, a January facing life altering challenges, and her poignant battles to fight the ingrained responses instilled in her from childhood, and I adored Jane, Samuel and the loyal Bad. This is an enchanting read, lyrical, full of charm, that manages to connect with our inner desires and belief that there is magic and hope out there, although perhaps it is unlikely to appeal to those who have a more sceptical nature. An unmissable read for those who adore this type of fantasy, brilliant, colourful, vibrant, with echoes of the darkest of fairytales, and infused with the grim realities of our contemporary world when it comes to issues of race. Highly recommended. Many thanks to Little, Brown for an ARC.

  • Petrik

    Orbit did it again.

    has shot to the top of my TBR since the moment I saw the cover and heard about the premise; I was charmed and can safely say that I don’t think I’ve read many books as beautifully written as this novel. I’ve been saying this over and over again for a while now; wh

    Orbit did it again.

    has shot to the top of my TBR since the moment I saw the cover and heard about the premise; I was charmed and can safely say that I don’t think I’ve read many books as beautifully written as this novel. I’ve been saying this over and over again for a while now; when it comes to modern SFF debuts, just read everything that Orbit publishes. SFF books published by Orbit these days has a strong chance to satisfy your reading preferences and this novel amplified that notion. I would also like to give a shout out to Emily Byron, who made sure this book reached me for my review, and Maddie Hall, the one in charge of the design behind the ARC packaging of this book; easily the most beautiful ARC package I’ve ever received.

    revolves around January Scaller. January was seven years old when she first found a Door. Years later, January starts forgetting about her brief encounter with that Door, until one day she stumbles upon a book. Reading the book changes everything as she begins to discover the truths and revelations surrounding her worlds, and the Door she found when she was a kid. This is not an action-packed book; if you read this book expecting warfare and intricate battle scenes, you’ll be sorely disappointed. Instead of filling the pages with action and brutality, Harrow opted for dazzling readers with everlasting stories of wonder brimming with a nostalgic and elegant atmosphere. This is a novel about a book, about stories, and about escapism.

    I truly believe that escapism, for me, is not only a want but a necessity. Whether this is in the form of video games, movies, or reading; they’re all a form of art that makes our harsh realities saner and more livable.

    felt like a letter written by a voracious reader to another reader. From the very first page, I was immediately struck with the notion that this book will resonate a lot with me and each page gradually continued to strongly enhance that early impression. I just can’t help but say that this is a book that must be read by most readers as long that you’re okay with not having battle scenes in your stories.

    Harrow implemented the importance of stories into the plot wonderfully. Family, love, and adventures were also some of the main themes contained in the novel. A book has the power to change a reader’s perception; to be more open-minded and knowledgeable; to experience adventure and transport us to a different world; reading or writing is magic and many of us are capable of it.

    As someone who’s born in January, I found the main character and the meaning behind her name to be a huge plus of the book. This doesn’t mean that you HAVE to be born in January to appreciate it. Names have a power, a meaning, and life of its own; these were discussed within the book and I enjoyed reading them all. Most importantly, January is a heroine that resonated with me. There weren’t a lot of characters, but I found the characterizations splendidly written. Each character has a distinctive personality and attitude that felt genuine and flawed.

    If you’ve seen reviews of this book before, you’ll probably notice that the majority of them—whether they loved the book or not overall—agreed that the prose is beautiful; I definitely agree with this statement with all my heart. Seriously, Harrow has a highly-polished prose that totally didn’t feel like a debut effort. The prose was lush, lyrical, enchanting, gorgeous, and immersive. This novel marks the dawn of a new fantasy author with immaculate prose that’s very rare to find in the genre. The contemplative and philosophical nature of the writing made me wish I can tell you all the resplendent phrases I’ve stumbled upon. Words easily translated into imagery; every locale and scene were visualized in my head. I’m in disbelief that this is a debut, the author has such an immense subjugation over the structure of words. I can’t wait for you to find out how spectacularly written this book was.

    Alluring passages comprising meticulously chosen words were conjured and evident in every page; Harrow exhibited storytelling skill that gives justice to the saying that the pen is mightier than the sword.

    is one of the most beautifully-written debuts I’ve ever read; a big contender for the new tale as old as time, and a must-read fantasy book for every reader who loves books and enjoys reading a superb elaboration of stories and escapism. Every story opens a door, and every door opens a story. Once you opened the door behind the cover of this book, you’ll be happily compelled to search every nook and cranny of the story before you’re able to close the door again. An eternal charm lies in January’s adventure, and believe me when I say that you need to get the key to open the magic door called

    as soon as possible.

  • Amalia Gavea

    January is a young girl torn between two worlds. Her parentage makes her special, yet people see what they want to see, dictated by the (twisted) preconceived notions of the early 20th-centur

    January is a young girl torn between two worlds. Her parentage makes her special, yet people see what they want to see, dictated by the (twisted) preconceived notions of the early 20th-century society. Motherless and with an absent father, January tries to find an escape and a purpose to satisfy her ever-searching mind and soul. And then, doors start appearing. Doors leading to different worlds, doors hiding adventure and danger. And, perhaps, the key that leads to her past and her family.

    If nothing else, this novel is rich in beautiful bookish references. I found some of the most powerful descriptions of the impact of books in our lives, the way they shape our souls, the difference we unwittingly form in relation to people who don't touch a book, remaining prisoners of the telly and their mundane microcosm. Books make us soar, imagination runs wild and doors open, leading to new worlds and new characters that become our company. Some momentary, others become friends and loves for life. January discovers a new life through a book of Ten Thousand Doors, aided by a brave young woman.

    The same adjectives can be used to characterize January and Jane, two memorable characters that become the perfect companions for such a story. They are faithful to their course, fearless and realistic. But for me, the crown jewel is Ade. Ade and Jul's relationship is beautiful and moving and it touched me so much that once Ade was kept out of the picture, I began to lose interest... At times the narration drags and the dialogue becomes too contemporary, arguably unfaithful to the era depicted. Certain incidents and twists were repetitive and predictable. Once January discovers her past, the writing and the story slow down. In addition, certain parts of the plot seem too neatly wrapped and others were left loose.

    I am certain that Fantasy lovers will adore this novel. It was definitely a satisfying and unusual read but it didn't particularly stick with me. Which is fine, not all books can enter the Favourites squad. The writing was beautiful and the themes powerful but I lost focus and grew tired towards the final chapters. Therefore, four stars from me.

    Many thanks to Orbit and NetGalley for the ARC in exchange for an honest review.

    My reviews can also be found on

  • jessica

    and the words in this story shape a most delightful world - filled with imagination, wonder, adventure, and love.

    any story that focuses on the importance of words and stories is one that i will always find comforting. i appreciate how january is a character who also finds comfort in books and the power of words and also sees stories as a means of escape. it makes to her relatab

    and the words in this story shape a most delightful world - filled with imagination, wonder, adventure, and love.

    any story that focuses on the importance of words and stories is one that i will always find comforting. i appreciate how january is a character who also finds comfort in books and the power of words and also sees stories as a means of escape. it makes to her relatable to every reader, myself included.

    the writing is also a great asset to this story. its very exquisite. it feels traditional, but approachable. vivid, yet grounded. its really quite a pleasure to read such beautiful words.

    my only critique would be the story is very slow and lost my interest at times. theres only so much a relatable character and lovely writing can do. maybe i was in the mood for something more engaging and not something so narrative heavy. but it feels quite unfair to give this anything less than 4 stars.

    i think that readers who are willing to be patient enough to see this story through will find it just as comforting and magical as i did, if not more!

  • megs_bookrack

    I'm sorry, everyone. I just did not enjoy this book. I really wanted to, I was so hyped for it, then I saw all the reviews coming in and they were fantastic! I couldn't wait to get into it.

    Then I started reading. The writing was a little qclass="gr-hostedUserImg">((sound

    I'm sorry, everyone. I just did not enjoy this book. I really wanted to, I was so hyped for it, then I saw all the reviews coming in and they were fantastic! I couldn't wait to get into it.

    Then I started reading. The writing was a little quirky at first but my interest was still high. Then it just seemed to not be going anywhere. I wasn't feeling anything. Like, at all.

    The writing was flowery and beautiful but I felt like the plot got lost in all of that. I dreaded picking it back up and really struggled almost the entire way through.

    There was a sweet spot for me between 50% and 80% where I felt briefly connected but sadly, that's just not enough.

    If you read through the reviews, I am clearly in the minority opinion. I have read the reviews. I know.

    When I first finished, I contemplated giving this a 2.5-star and rounding up to 3, but then I slept on it and came to the conclusion that I would just be doing that to appease people. I genuinely did not enjoy this book.

    I can understand why so many people have loved this and I am happy that they found something in here that resonated with them, that's just not me.

    I love portal fantasy;

    or

    series are great examples but this fell so flat for me.

    The characters seemed one dimensional and I had zero connection to any of them. I don't need to like characters but I do need to actually care about what ultimately happens to them.

    The only character I cared about was the dog, Bad. I was so worried about that dog, and traumatized by things that happened to him, that I was never able to relax into the story.

    That is 100% a personal preference and it has spoiled books for me in the past -- see my review for

    by Nick Cutter -- but yeah, there's not much here to save this story from that pitfall.

    With all of this being said, I would never want a personal review from myself to keep people from picking up a book that really interests them. If you think this sounds intriguing, please pick it up and try it for yourself. There is a book for every reader and a reader for every book. Unfortunately, this just wasn't my cuppa tea.

    Thank you so much to the publisher, Redhook Books, for providing me with a copy to read and review. I truly appreciate the opportunity and know that many, many readers are going to absolutely adore January's story.

  • Teodora

    Seeing the cover? - Want it!

    Seeing the synopsis? - Need it!

    Realising it is about escaping the reality? - Well, run a DNA test cuz I and this book relate for sure

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