Good Things Happen to People You Hate: Essays

Good Things Happen to People You Hate: Essays

For lovers of Sloane Crosley and Samantha Irby, this hilarious and raw essay collection paints a recognizable and relatable portrait of life in the early aughts.Former Senior Editor for Gothamist Rebecca Fishbein’s adult life has been a dramatic reflection of New York media itself—constantly evolving in unexpected ways and seemingly always on the edge of disaster. In short, Rebec...

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Title:Good Things Happen to People You Hate: Essays
Author:Rebecca Fishbein
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Good Things Happen to People You Hate: Essays Reviews

  • Tatum Bowen

    This is the first essay I have ever read and I was pleasantly surprised! If you love reading books with cynical humor and pitiful (yet super relatable!) stories then this should be on your to-read. I haven't experienced all of the "adventures" Fishbein has gone through, but I do know that life is a firestorm mixed with a tornado full of some cruddy people. It's nice to know you're never alone in your misery (and, yes, sometimes your happiness) even if you so desperately want to believe that you

    This is the first essay I have ever read and I was pleasantly surprised! If you love reading books with cynical humor and pitiful (yet super relatable!) stories then this should be on your to-read. I haven't experienced all of the "adventures" Fishbein has gone through, but I do know that life is a firestorm mixed with a tornado full of some cruddy people. It's nice to know you're never alone in your misery (and, yes, sometimes your happiness) even if you so desperately want to believe that you are.

  • Jake Offenhartz

    Lotta people say something is laugh out loud funny, but they don't really mean it. This collection (GTHtPYH) is cackle-inducing. Like if Norah Ephron and David Sedaris procreated a book after being forced to actually stay in NYC for their entire lives. It's also dark and human and keenly aware of our current cultural predicament. But somehow great to read on the beach?

    Fishbein writes – on dating, on bedbugs, on watching your industry burn to the ground – with the effortless wizened-ness of some

    Lotta people say something is laugh out loud funny, but they don't really mean it. This collection (GTHtPYH) is cackle-inducing. Like if Norah Ephron and David Sedaris procreated a book after being forced to actually stay in NYC for their entire lives. It's also dark and human and keenly aware of our current cultural predicament. But somehow great to read on the beach?

    Fishbein writes – on dating, on bedbugs, on watching your industry burn to the ground – with the effortless wizened-ness of someone who has seen it all. She shares generously, and we are lucky for it. Buy the book, and maybe good things will happen to you!

  • Sam Corbin

    Over the course of this essay collection, I laughed, I cried, I gasped at just how sharply I was relating to the experiences recounted therein. Fishbein's writing is smart, frank and funny, and this particular collection of essays focuses on topics universal to the millennial experience without pandering to them or glossing over their ugly excesses. If you like Melissa Broder or Fleabag — which is to say, if you like witnessing women who are on the verge of a nervous breakdown finding ways to tu

    Over the course of this essay collection, I laughed, I cried, I gasped at just how sharply I was relating to the experiences recounted therein. Fishbein's writing is smart, frank and funny, and this particular collection of essays focuses on topics universal to the millennial experience without pandering to them or glossing over their ugly excesses. If you like Melissa Broder or Fleabag — which is to say, if you like witnessing women who are on the verge of a nervous breakdown finding ways to turn their constant, simmering panic about being alive into something joyful — you will like this book. A lot.

  • Dan

    Only put the book down to grab something to eat!

    Full of clever, dark humor that makes you chuckle and even laugh out loud. Though it is written to take you through her fears, insecurities, and awkward experiences, it certainly makes you reflect on your own.

    Highly recommend.

  • Tim

    Love this roller coaster ride of what it's like to be young, smart and trying to make it as a writer as the industry crumbles around you. Rebecca's essays are full of humor that will hit home with anyone who feels let down by the world around them but still trying to find the joy and a sense of control in the chaotic hookups and personality defining adventures within her grasp. Highly recommended reading for anyone in the market for a Joan Didion of the Brooklyn dirtbag writer set.

  • Leslie

    Happy happy book birthday to this gem of a book by Rebecca Fishbein, and shoutout to William Morrow for the finished copy.

    If you’re missing your hilarious and snarky bff from college, pick up this book! Also, maybe you wanna call them and tell them how much you miss them and about your terrible Tinder date last week. And remember, “Dying alone is better than signing up for a lifetime of Sex Dates.”

    In this witty collection of Essays, Fishbein tackles everything from bad da

    Happy happy book birthday to this gem of a book by Rebecca Fishbein, and shoutout to William Morrow for the finished copy.

    If you’re missing your hilarious and snarky bff from college, pick up this book! Also, maybe you wanna call them and tell them how much you miss them and about your terrible Tinder date last week. And remember, “Dying alone is better than signing up for a lifetime of Sex Dates.”

    In this witty collection of Essays, Fishbein tackles everything from bad dating and depression to the pitfalls of upsetting Taylor Swift’s fans. It’s hilarious, heartbreaking, and brutally honest about the lives of “adult” millennials. Though I wanted to devour this collection, I savored it, reading only one essay every day or every couple of days. Now that it’s done, I want to start it all over again.

    “The myth of depression is that it’s something that gets better, when really it’s just something that lives inside you all the time, sometimes dormant, sometimes not.” That punched me in the gut. Like any cynical millennial worth her salt, Fishbein peppers her sarcasm and dark humor with wisdom and honest depth, a perfect pairing for someone who also masks her pain with bitter comedy. What can I say? This collection spoke to me.

    It’s out today, so be sure to add it to your fall/winter nonfiction TBR!

  • Rachel Witkin

    Rebecca is so funny and insightful and this book touches on everything that living in a big city in your twenties is, from anxiety fueled social interactions to bedbugs.

  • Andy Winder

    the best part about this book is that all the essay titles look like panic! at the disco song names

  • Jen McDermott

    Cute collection of essays. I used to read these types of books in my 20's and now in my 30's, I found her anecdotes a little unrelatable or maybe, irritating. Tsk'ing at some of her poor choices aside, I enjoyed the read!

  • Sarah

    Confused how most of the reviews came out well before the book?

    It is very well written but repetitive as another mentioned. It's clear the author has potential as a writer, but a few essays in you will want to scream 'I get it!' The author is consistently frustrated with anyone who, heaven forbid, experiences growth instead of remaining stagnant and bitter. I assumed there would be some insight regarding emotional growth through tough times, using humor to coat it all, but instead, almost every

    Confused how most of the reviews came out well before the book?

    It is very well written but repetitive as another mentioned. It's clear the author has potential as a writer, but a few essays in you will want to scream 'I get it!' The author is consistently frustrated with anyone who, heaven forbid, experiences growth instead of remaining stagnant and bitter. I assumed there would be some insight regarding emotional growth through tough times, using humor to coat it all, but instead, almost every essay concludes that everyone must be as miserable as the author so she doesn't need to change. This kind of 'self-deprecation as an identity makes me cool' went out with the '90s.

    It's also out of touch at times not just in regards to how she copes with her struggles, but how she relates to work. Complaining about having to work three days in a row or ranting about how no one wants to pay her to be an antisocial blogger or how hard it was to only receive 4 months severance pay is the spoiled millennial trope personified.

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