Meet Me in the Future: Stories

Meet Me in the Future: Stories

“One of the best story collections of the past few years.” —Booklist, starred review“16 hard-edged pieces that gleam like gems in a mosaic.” —Publishers Weekly, starred review“Kameron Hurley is a badass.” —Annalee Newitz, author of AutonomousWhen renegade author Kameron Hurley (The Light Brigade; The Stars Are Legion) takes you to the future, be prepared for the unexpected. Yes, it will be dangerous, frequen(The—Publishers—,...

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Title:Meet Me in the Future: Stories
Author:Kameron Hurley
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Edition Language:English

Meet Me in the Future: Stories Reviews

  • Jim

    I loved APOCALYPSE NYX when I got to read it and I have yet to pick up the GOD'S WAR books or anything else by Hurley, but I did get to read the short stories in MEET ME in the FUTURE and I must say, I was even more impressed with her raw, beautiful stories and characters.

    Hurley is unapologetic about the stories (read her Introduction for more information).

    I will hunt her books down and read them all. There are very few authors I feel that way about, but Hurley is definitely one of

    I loved APOCALYPSE NYX when I got to read it and I have yet to pick up the GOD'S WAR books or anything else by Hurley, but I did get to read the short stories in MEET ME in the FUTURE and I must say, I was even more impressed with her raw, beautiful stories and characters.

    Hurley is unapologetic about the stories (read her Introduction for more information).

    I will hunt her books down and read them all. There are very few authors I feel that way about, but Hurley is definitely one of them.

  • Silvana

    I read the stories already via Patreon. Fantastic collection of diverse, layered, strong characters and worldbuilding. It is Kameron Hurley, after all, so I am definitely and unapologetically biased.

  • Bradley

    I'm generally not that big into short stories and by way of Hurley's introduction, I might have expected her to do a so-so job with these... but Hurley lies. The writer's talents are equal across novels and short fiction. Sorry, Hurley, you're good! lol

    Indeed, most of these stories are pretty amazing, delving not only into her Nyx fiction and Legion fiction and even Light Brigade, but this collection has a ton of stories that kicked me hard from a different world altogether. The only

    I'm generally not that big into short stories and by way of Hurley's introduction, I might have expected her to do a so-so job with these... but Hurley lies. The writer's talents are equal across novels and short fiction. Sorry, Hurley, you're good! lol

    Indeed, most of these stories are pretty amazing, delving not only into her Nyx fiction and Legion fiction and even Light Brigade, but this collection has a ton of stories that kicked me hard from a different world altogether. The only other series I haven't read is the Worldbreaker Saga and I'm honestly at a loss as to guess whether the other set of related stories revolving people jumping corpses is related to that or whether this is a taste of a brand new series to come.

    If it is, I'm TOTALLY DOWN FOR IT.

    Hey! Hey! But what about THIS short story collection? Is it GOOD?

    Sorry? Didn't I say?

    It's totally engrossing. :) Taken on its own without knowing any of the other novels, it completely works and showcases so much fungal growth, corpse making, body-horror, sexual-orientation-swapping, space-opera, disease-ridden, dog-loving joy as anyone could possibly want. And the worldbuilding is always extremely intense. :)

    I will get around to her other novels, but in the meantime, I am on auto-read for anything new that Hurley throws at us. Eagerly.

  • Serena

    I got this e ARC from Netgalley after requesting it.

    I enjoy short stories or anthologies,"Meet Me in the Future" asks how futures could play out - both ours and for worlds in fiction. What's the future if not something of a reflection of history's many nows, like a glimpse in a mirror or still water, a the kaleidoscope of possibilities, changeable still because every person carries their history and the history of imagined and dreamed stories. A lot of these short stories understandably dance b

    I got this e ARC from Netgalley after requesting it.

    I enjoy short stories or anthologies,"Meet Me in the Future" asks how futures could play out - both ours and for worlds in fiction. What's the future if not something of a reflection of history's many nows, like a glimpse in a mirror or still water, a the kaleidoscope of possibilities, changeable still because every person carries their history and the history of imagined and dreamed stories. A lot of these short stories understandably dance between biology and technology.

    Elephants and Corpses - Nev, a old "body mercenary", someone who if they die in one body can - if they've touched a dead body nearby - swap their "soul" or "spirit" into the dead body and animate it. He holds onto humanity though a animal contact, a elephant and later a turtle given to him by Tera his "body manager". Occult religious business and body mercenary workshop mix and Nev sorts out what he can from the mess left.

    When We Fall - I'd love to have a much longer story on Aisha, a jack of all trades and her fleet of warship's avatars Mirabelle and others of the Komani Enterprises freed by a tomato.

    The Red Secretary - Arkadi negotiates and must make a connection with a soldier who knows their end, because they've killed the enemy and gotten their hands dirty, who hold a weapon hostage, with nothing to lose because the end of the war means all who have bloodied their hands get incinerated.

    The Sinners and the Sea - Arret must choose the truth, the story, he can live with, the one that tells of a sea burying sinners hundreds of years ago and being a Guardian means containing ancinet relics - or that the relics are from people murdered by Guardians only a generation ago, and his people living in the sky survivors chosen by no god at all.

    The Women of Our Occupation- I had a little laugh with this story, when the world Feminazi comes up, likely I'll be showing this story to someone.

    The Fishermen and the Pig- Another Nev story, after living as a old fisherman for years with only a pig and a turtle for company, he gets caught up in a nercomancer plot to bring back the dead with black toxin from a long ago war, although I didn't like Branka's cliffhanger ending.

    Garda-A who done it mystery with a serial killer involving alien "boys" after a future war; focus is on Abijah's divorce to two wives and how she works with Pats, who she's known in that war.

    The Plague Givers - I would love a whole novel on Elzabet Addisalam, swamp dwelling stuffed hydra making former Plague Hunter with her history of a former lover a Plague Giver Hanere, their son Makdas, her partner Kelab -and later Lealez.

    Tumbledown- Sarnai, who got plague as a child and lost her legs and her fathers and mother to it on a alien world where dogs and bears don't seem to look as the ought to, uses a sled to get tumbledown plague serum to a distant village.

    Warped Passages - Malati and pilot and Kariz a engineer are siblings who lost their mother to the anomaly that holds their generation ships of the Legion still, caught in space, trapped, their choices are to change themselves or be changed.

    Our Faces, Radiant Sisters, Our Faces Full Of Light!- Moria follows generations of her mothers, grandmothers, and likely sisters, aunts and other women who fight monsters, for one less monster they'll trade their lives a sacrifice for the promise of generations of women to come.

    Enyo-Enyo -A fascinating dark take on how a ship takes to life among the stars and how time passes and acted out in "snapshots" of different futures.

    The Corpse Archives - Anish and Chiva make and unmake a history of aliens, their people, and their stories written on bodies, textbooks of "history".

    The War of Heroes - Yousra, a midwife, makes a choice to take the war to the alien "heroes" who have made her people monstrous.

    The Light Brigade- The war, a corporate one against aliens, people from Mars who turned barren Earth to free paradise, turned soldier who fight them into light, who can see glimpses of the future and can travel, like light, anywhere - and possibly, any when.

    The Improbable War - Khiv uses the wall, a engine of memory to the souls of soldiers, to fight a old enemy and end war, forever.

  • Acqua

    I could sum up my thoughts about

    by saying that

    the way I find short stories can be.

    These stories are not pretty. They’re not necessarily satisfying.

    , and I wouldn’t be surprised if that was the whole purpose of how some of these were written. They’re meant to be shared and talked about, not read and put down, I think.

    As yo

    I could sum up my thoughts about

    by saying that

    the way I find short stories can be.

    These stories are not pretty. They’re not necessarily satisfying.

    , and I wouldn’t be surprised if that was the whole purpose of how some of these were written. They’re meant to be shared and talked about, not read and put down, I think.

    As you’d expect from something Kameron Hurley wrote,

    . War is an element in the past, still casting a shadow on the main character (

    ), it’s something that is seen as inevitable by a society, but is also a direct danger to it (

    , oh had this story a lot to say), or something that is paradoxically seen by some as “bringing civilization” even as it actually destroys it (

    ), something that is always inherently tied to the dehumanization of someone (

    ) and horror, horror, horror as much as an instrument to keep the attention away from the actual enemy (

    – I recommend skipping this one if you want to read the book, however), something that needs to end (

    ).

    Not all of these were anything remarkable when read on their own. Inside the collection, it’s a running thread, and there is for sure a lot to discuss.

    There’s also, of course, a lot of

    . The collection starts with a body-hopping mercenary who happens to be a trans man (

    ), and presents gender as something not tied to bodies, even though still relevant to the person, and continues with stories about violent matriarchies (

    , possibly my least favorite story, I’m not that interested in reading about speculative reverse sexism), stories in which gender is never stated (

    ), stories in which there’s only one gender (

    ), and stories in which there are at least four different genders recognized by the society (

    , my favorite story). In these stories,

    - queer, disabled, brown women are allowed to be all of these things without ever be seen as anything but wholly human, the way a man could be portrayed. The idea that women have to be beautiful is so woven into everything, even everything fictional, that these stories almost feel jarring.

    And, since we’re talking about women and imperfections, here

    . I will always be there for portrayals of queer women that are all but soft and unproblematic; in

    we get a woman who is divorcing from her two wives (if the story had been about that, instead of becoming about a mystery with a main character who wasn’t Nyx but felt exactly like Nyx from the

    series, I would have liked it a lot more), and in

    we get a story about the consequences of a very toxic f/f relationship in a world where magic can bring plague (I loved this one so much).

    There are a couple stories that felt like filler (notably,

    was a completely unnecessary sequel to

    ), but overall,

    ; the average rating might be

    , but

    .

    – 4 stars

    – 4 stars

    – 4 stars

    – 3.5 stars

    – 2 stars

    – 2 stars

    – 3 stars

    – 4.5 stars

    – 4 stars

    – 4 stars

    – 2.5 stars

    – 3 stars

    – 2.5 stars

    – 3.5 stars

    – 4.5 stars

    – 3 stars

  • MeaganCM

    Loved it! 🥰😍 RTC (maybe lol)

  • Jenny (Reading Envy)

    Kameron Hurley has this incredible ability to occupy the spaces known to the science fiction canon but somehow occupy them subversively. Just like the novels I've read by her, the stories are violent and gritty, and not always hopeful.

    Some favorites:

    *Elephants and Corpses* could live in the universe of Altered Carbon but with a twist.

    *The Plague Givers* deals with a fallout of a relationship that might have the power to destroy the world.

    *Tumbledow

    Kameron Hurley has this incredible ability to occupy the spaces known to the science fiction canon but somehow occupy them subversively. Just like the novels I've read by her, the stories are violent and gritty, and not always hopeful.

    Some favorites:

    *Elephants and Corpses* could live in the universe of Altered Carbon but with a twist.

    *The Plague Givers* deals with a fallout of a relationship that might have the power to destroy the world.

    *Tumbledown* features a paraplegic warrior on a frozen planet.

  • Hélène Louise

    Good stories even if I've appreciated some more than others.

    The author's touch is always here, strong women who frequently have jobs, strengths and habits usually gifted to male characters, diverse sexuality and animals - with a special care about them (the reader doesn't need to be afraid that horrible things will happen to them).

    He worlds imagined are all rather harsh and injust, this is not some bedtime stories !

    I took time to read them all, because if all different they hav

    Good stories even if I've appreciated some more than others.

    The author's touch is always here, strong women who frequently have jobs, strengths and habits usually gifted to male characters, diverse sexuality and animals - with a special care about them (the reader doesn't need to be afraid that horrible things will happen to them).

    He worlds imagined are all rather harsh and injust, this is not some bedtime stories !

    I took time to read them all, because if all different they have many shared points (thanks to the author's personality) and Ì needed to pause regularly, not to get tired.

  • Alex

    Kameron Hurley’s heart belongs to novels.

    ’s introduction tells the reader as much instantly. And yet this is her second collection (third, depending on whether you believe the book itself or Hurley’s Wikipedia). To that end, some parts of

    are considerably stronger than others. These stories represent Hurley’s particular fascinations: womens’ place in society, the impermanence of bodies; plague and pathology. Some she communicates well in sparkling stories, but

    Kameron Hurley’s heart belongs to novels.

    ’s introduction tells the reader as much instantly. And yet this is her second collection (third, depending on whether you believe the book itself or Hurley’s Wikipedia). To that end, some parts of

    are considerably stronger than others. These stories represent Hurley’s particular fascinations: womens’ place in society, the impermanence of bodies; plague and pathology. Some she communicates well in sparkling stories, but others collapse under their own weight.

    The collection opens with one of its best stories, “Elephants and Corpses”. “Elephants and Corpses” is a vignette in the life of body mercenary Nev, who spends his days fishing up corpses to inhabit, even though his battlefield days are behind him. Nev shows up in the later story “The Fisherman and the Pig”, at a time when body mercenaries are even less relevant. Both stories speak to a rich character who exists in a curious world with unplumbed deaths. One could happily read a full novel either about Nev or the society that birthed him, and the satisfaction these stories provides is emblematic of the strongest elements of the collection.  Hurley acknowledges the tricks that she performs to make Nev a sympathetic character in the body of the text, but it’s difficult to resent her for it.

    The grounding of Nev stands out in particular against the multiple free-standing stories that have deliberately opaque settings. “The Plague Givers” is something of a novella in which there are four genders. Hurley presents her worlds as if they’re established, and maybe the reader doesn’t have time to get an entire history of the Plague society, but there’s no real entrée to any of these gender concepts. It wouldn’t matter so much if her pronoun system wasn’t utterly confounding. One of the genders is “pan”, and instead of he/his, she/her, they/them or even zie/zir pronouns, the pan have “per/per”. This stylistic choice renders multiple passages difficult to parse without repeated backtracking. Research suggests that this particular system was inspired by Marge Piercy’s

    but one hopes that Piercy incorporated the per pronoun with more finesse than Hurley has here.

    It’s unfortunate, as “The Plague Givers” is otherwise a workable story, although by the time that it appears it is starting to feel familiar within the context of the collection. Hurley oscillates between presenting disease as neutral or a force of evil, but the scope of the world is too large for the ground that “The Plague Givers” covers. We have context for the Bet, the protagonist, but it is difficult to know what anything in her society means. 

    This contextless existence carries across to the “The Corpse Archives”, potentially the weakest story in the collection. The communication of the protagonist’s existence is sketchy, and descriptors are withheld until it is too late for them to influence the story. It is set in something like a maze of interlocking hexagons, and it feels like the reader might never escape. Mysteries that cannot be resolved can only carry a reader so far; Hurley does not provide enough information for any gaps to be filled on the reader’s own recognisance, rendering “The Corpse Archives” more frustrating than arresting. Combined with “The Plague Givers”, both stories represent Hurley’s occasional confusion on a sentence level across the entire collection: names, pronouns and words are frequently repeated redundantly and, even when the ideas are solid, the prose does not provide the momentum needed to propel a reader from one story to the next.

    Outside of those two stories,

    is a more assured mixture of science fiction and fantasy pieces, and Hurley is clearly skilled in both registers. “Garda” is a deep dive into the life of an alcoholic private eye whose two wives left her for each other and, and the character and planet that she resides on are fascinating; the investigation is functional enough, but it is window dressing for the world building it enables.

    Special mention also goes to “The Women of our Occupation”, the description of a society occupied by an exclusively female foreign force. This is the example of a story that is able to stand on its own while raising a series of titillating but unanswerable questions. If much of

    is variations on themes, “The Women of our Occupation” is the platonic ideal of many of them.

    is a collection that errs on the side of the positive. The best concepts on display here could be fleshed into novels — two of them, in fact, were published in novel form before being collected here — and there is only one story that could stand to have been cut entirely. Hurley is an author of no small talent, but one suited to a larger scale.

    is a diving off point for bigger things: an escape pod dreaming of being a star destroyer. 

  • Sam

    2.5 Stars. Thanks to NetGalley and Tachyon Publications for providing me with an e-ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review.

    I was really expecting to love this book, but it sadly fell a bit short for me. I really liked the concept, and I enjoyed some of the individual stories, but overall, I found the experience of reading this collection to be a bit tedious. I think Hurley explores the same themes (such as gender and a a person's relationship with their own body) in a lot o

    2.5 Stars. Thanks to NetGalley and Tachyon Publications for providing me with an e-ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review.

    I was really expecting to love this book, but it sadly fell a bit short for me. I really liked the concept, and I enjoyed some of the individual stories, but overall, I found the experience of reading this collection to be a bit tedious. I think Hurley explores the same themes (such as gender and a a person's relationship with their own body) in a lot of her fiction, and while I think that can be a good thing, in the case of a short story collection, it can make all of the stories start to bleed together in the mind of the reader. At least, that is something I found to be true for myself. I have read and enjoyed one of Kameron Hurley's novels (The Stars Are Legion), and am interested in reading more from her in the future... but I think I will stick with her longer fiction going forward.

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