Everything is F*cked: A Book About Hope

Everything is F*cked: A Book About Hope

From the author of the international mega-bestseller The Subtle Art of Not Giving A F*ck comes a counterintuitive guide to the problems of hope. We live in an interesting time. Materially, everything is the best it’s ever been—we are freer, healthier and wealthier than any people in human history. Yet, somehow everything seems to be irreparably and horribly f*cked—the plan...

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Title:Everything is F*cked: A Book About Hope
Author:Mark Manson
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Everything is F*cked: A Book About Hope Reviews

  • David Lee

    If you liked Subtle Art, you'll enjoy this too. I couldn't put it down, actually, reading it in under a day.

    Mark has a talent for taking potentially boring subject matter, such as the teachings of philosophers, and bringing it to life in easy-to-understand language (with plenty of expletives).

    I especially liked his Consciousness Car metaphor in explaining the Thinking Brain vs Feeling Brain (would l

    If you liked Subtle Art, you'll enjoy this too. I couldn't put it down, actually, reading it in under a day.

    Mark has a talent for taking potentially boring subject matter, such as the teachings of philosophers, and bringing it to life in easy-to-understand language (with plenty of expletives).

    I especially liked his Consciousness Car metaphor in explaining the Thinking Brain vs Feeling Brain (would love to see an animated cartoon version), and thoughts on antifragility and how we benefit by choosing to accept (and even seek out) discomfort in our lives.

    If you've been feeling like the world is a mess (especially in terms of politics) lately, this book can help you make sense of what's going on. And, it includes some takeaways we as individuals can use to help make a positive difference for ourselves, and by extension, society.

  • Ella

    I only say this because as a person who has read a lot of his articles as well as his previous book, The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck, there are a lot of concepts in this book that can be perceived as radical, and possibly downright offensive. The keyword is perceived. When you come into this book hoping and/or believing that this book will affirm all of your biases, all of your hopes and dreams, all of what you stand for, then you wouldn't have a gre

    I only say this because as a person who has read a lot of his articles as well as his previous book, The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck, there are a lot of concepts in this book that can be perceived as radical, and possibly downright offensive. The keyword is perceived. When you come into this book hoping and/or believing that this book will affirm all of your biases, all of your hopes and dreams, all of what you stand for, then you wouldn't have a great time.

    This book talks about philosophy, human existence, psychology, democracy, religion, politics, money, etc. and it takes quite a controversial but rational standpoint on these fields. Yes, sometimes while reading this book it'll be difficult to get through some of the philosophical concepts. Yes, sometimes (or most times) you will get offended by what Mark says. And yes, you would want to put the book down.

    But don't. Instead, read on, or better yet, reflect first as to why you feel the way you feel. Don't succumb to the dichotomy of "good" and "bad" feelings i.e., if you feel offended, don't automatically assume that it's because what Mark wrote was wrong and you're right. This book calls upon reflection of everything ugly in all of us, and if you can't keep your biases at bay, or on hold, you will not enjoy reading this book.

    But, if you go into this with an open mind, prepared to feel both validated and hurt, both offended and reassured, then I think this would be a great reading experience for you.

    Overall, I gave this book 5 stars, because just like The Subtle Art, it called into question everything I believed, and for me, it strengthened some of my beliefs, and weakened others. A first for me in a long time.

  • Kalyn Nicholson

    If I were to ask someone to “give it to me straight” in terms of life, humanity and our future potential, this book would be it.

    Amazing read, push through the first few chapters and you’ll see how it all ties together in the end!

  • Adam Woods

    Something is very wrong with the world. It’s us. We have abandoned our quest for character in favour of one for happiness and we have created a world of diversions that give the illusion of freedom but in fact keep us docile and imprisoned.

    Manson has written a book that will stay with me for a while. This very well-researched exploration into human virtues (and hope in particular) isn’t exactly warm and fuzzy. Nor is it pessimistic. In fact it is paradoxically optimistic for a book t

    Something is very wrong with the world. It’s us. We have abandoned our quest for character in favour of one for happiness and we have created a world of diversions that give the illusion of freedom but in fact keep us docile and imprisoned.

    Manson has written a book that will stay with me for a while. This very well-researched exploration into human virtues (and hope in particular) isn’t exactly warm and fuzzy. Nor is it pessimistic. In fact it is paradoxically optimistic for a book that genuinely and convincingly lays out that everything is indeed f*cked!

    His trademark wit is still on display but Manson strikes a slightly more academic tone than in his first book, which was a welcome change of pace. In fact this book has inspired me to learn more about Manson’s (and the world’s) philosophical greats and read a few of his sources. I think that’s a good thing.

    Manson, once again, holds a mirror up to the reader, which can be confronting (in a good way), and makes demands on us to be better. Not merely hope to be better. But BE better. And that’s a message I can get behind.

    Give this book a go...

  • Heidi The Reader

    This creatively titled self-help book,

    , presents psychology, philosophy and the author's view of reality. In a series of essays, Mark Manson discusses a variety of topics including the differences between the "thinking brain" and "feeling brain." He uses Isaac Newton's laws to create a parallel universe's version of emotional laws and completes a fairly scathing dissection of religion. Throughout the various topics, he circles back to the idea of hope and how it can potentially cre

    This creatively titled self-help book,

    , presents psychology, philosophy and the author's view of reality. In a series of essays, Mark Manson discusses a variety of topics including the differences between the "thinking brain" and "feeling brain." He uses Isaac Newton's laws to create a parallel universe's version of emotional laws and completes a fairly scathing dissection of religion. Throughout the various topics, he circles back to the idea of hope and how it can potentially create more problems than it solves.

    Why did Manson write a book about hope?

    pg 15

    I did not read Manson's other incredibly popular title,

    , so I went into this one not knowing what to expect. I found Manson to be particularly adept at breaking down complex topics into simple, easy-to-understand analogies.

    For example, here's his take on the psychological cause of a underlying feeling of unworthiness:

    pg 46

    And here's the analogy he crafts around his explanation of unworthiness:

    pg 46

    His writing is simple and succinct, which could be incredibly useful for readers who are looking for more information about the self help topics presented. I didn't particularly care for Manson's overall style, but that's a personal preference rather than a commentary on the value of what he's discussing.

    pg 70

    I think this author may be similar to

    and her series of self help books about

    . Readers either love or hate those, I fell somewhere in between.

    My favorite part of this was when Manson dived into some Buddhist philosophy in the chapter, "Pain is the Universal Constant." He discusses the teaching of suffering being similar to a person struck by arrows. The first arrow brings physical pain and the second brings the emotional pain, which can be far worse and last longer than the physical pain because of the narratives we weave around it. Through meditation, the second arrow, emotional pain, can be diminished or perhaps eliminated.

    pg 186

    Recommended for readers who aren't offended by strong language and have the ability to hold the book they're reading in that gap in their minds — between the thoughts and the emotions, in the space of pure being. I'll meet you there. :)

  • Lindsay Nixon

    Arg, it's really difficult for me to rate this a 3-star. (UPDATE after more thought and discussion, this isn't a 3-star, it's a 2-star)

    This isn't a "book" in my opinion. It's more of a collection of essays, "blog posts" and articles you'd see on HuffPo (or perhaps NPR).

    There are some parts of the 'book' that were well researched, provided excellent points and I thought to myself "oh wow" and "I'm going to have to read this again!!!" Then there were other parts that I was

    Arg, it's really difficult for me to rate this a 3-star. (UPDATE after more thought and discussion, this isn't a 3-star, it's a 2-star)

    This isn't a "book" in my opinion. It's more of a collection of essays, "blog posts" and articles you'd see on HuffPo (or perhaps NPR).

    There are some parts of the 'book' that were well researched, provided excellent points and I thought to myself "oh wow" and "I'm going to have to read this again!!!" Then there were other parts that I was like "WHAT IS THIS?" and "WHY IS THIS HERE?"

    The writing also oscillated between deplorable to somewhat academic.

    There are times where it reads like a polished, academic book but more often it is ranty with slang like "Cray cray" and vulgar examples that Manson seems to slip in for shock value except it doesn't work.

    Manson is also a terrible narrator. His voice isn't just bleh, but he can't even seem to properly read his own writing--he can't deliver his own jokes and punchlines. It comes out awkward and unnatural-- making his "cray cray" and other slang even more distracting.

    I also kept having a revolving thought, "DAMN THIS IS SOME RICH WHITE MALE PRIVILEGE & MANSPLAINING" not that the subjects he approached where "white male privilege shit" (though there is some of that) but that he seems to overlook privilege quite a bit.

    Yet there were some parts of the book that I thought were excellent, though most of them were rehashing from other outstanding books I've read such as

    , Ryan Holiday/Stoicism,

    or anything by Pinkner,

    or anything by Chip & Dan Heath, plus Nietzsche & Plato. His last bit on AI was interesting, though I suspect that was parlayed from somewhere/someone else.

  • Mehrsa

    The book was a meaningless string of random thoughts and stoic philosophy and meditation. It was funny at parts, but mostly just a few interesting stories and cliches that are set up as being new insight. Also, I don't buy stoicism and meditation as a way forward. I am still interested in progress and I do think social movements can make people's lives better. Manson seems to think it's all just vain showing off and we should all just chill, but life isn't about peace and happiness. We also sear

    The book was a meaningless string of random thoughts and stoic philosophy and meditation. It was funny at parts, but mostly just a few interesting stories and cliches that are set up as being new insight. Also, I don't buy stoicism and meditation as a way forward. I am still interested in progress and I do think social movements can make people's lives better. Manson seems to think it's all just vain showing off and we should all just chill, but life isn't about peace and happiness. We also search meaning.

  • Uddipta

    Did not finish.

    He starts off by mentioning the holocaust, how people had "real" problems back then, compared to us who are now weeping at minor inconveniences behind closed doors: crying for an ex, crying because someone was rude to us, etc. I find this comparison disgusting and I mean it. The problems back then were physical and very different. There was no internet back then. Now, in the internet age, we have lots of things to compare ourselves with. Everyday, whether we want it or not,

    Did not finish.

    He starts off by mentioning the holocaust, how people had "real" problems back then, compared to us who are now weeping at minor inconveniences behind closed doors: crying for an ex, crying because someone was rude to us, etc. I find this comparison disgusting and I mean it. The problems back then were physical and very different. There was no internet back then. Now, in the internet age, we have lots of things to compare ourselves with. Everyday, whether we want it or not, we are constantly reminded of the things we lack. And at the end of the day, when we reach home, it takes a family or a closed one to help us forget those things.

    Secondly, the writing. He speaks of things in a very patronizing manner which I found really irritating and was what made me drop this book.

    I loved his first book and on my worst days, it provides a sense of comfort unlike anything. But this book, I don't know what happened with the author. I am not trying to find comfort, but maybe just give me some substance. Time is precious and I cannot waste it anymore after getting into 20% of this one. Maybe he got too much into himself. Now that he is rich, he forgot how to relate to the common folks. This book is indeed "f*cked".

  • Nikita

    Can someone please remind me never to pick a Mark Manson book again? The writing is insufferable, he grossly oversimplifies ideas that need a more nuanced view, makes preposterous generalizations about mental health and related concepts, and generally makes you wonder what his point really is. Not sure how he gets published, but seems to be riding a strange wave with the word *fuck* in his titles.

  • Katie

    I’ll have a full review soon, but for now: y i k e s

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