Black Spire

Black Spire

Walk the ancient streets, meet the colorful characters, and uncover the secret history of Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge, the upcoming expansion to the Disney Parks experience!After devastating losses at the hands of the First Order, General Leia Organa has dispatched her agents across the galaxy in search of allies, sanctuary, and firepower—and her top spy, Vi Moradi, may have...

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Title:Black Spire
Author:Delilah S. Dawson
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Black Spire Reviews

  • William Schaller

    Dawson did an excellent job tying a poignant spy story to the introduction of a new land/theme park. At first I was worried this was going to be an extended rip off of a Diagon Alley story set in the Star Wars universe, but the likable characters, vivid descriptions, and fast paced missions were entertaining—properly matching the feels and styles of a galaxy far, far away.

  • Lisa

    Review Pending

  • Jaime

    Delilah Dawson KNOWS Star Wars. Her writing GETS IT. I loved the pacing of this book, the characters, the multiple stories - definitely one of the best SW books I’ve read in a long time.

  • Jeff Heimbuch

    Despite living close to Disneyland, I haven’t been to Galaxy’s Edge yet. But this...this made me more excited than ever to check it out. Dawson fleshed our this world and made it real. Made the characters living, breathing things. Made the story part of something you can live.

    This was a fantastic follow up to PHASMA, and a great piece of the Galaxy’s Edge canon. Till the Spire!

  • Danny

    Review originally posted:

    Book Review: My Complicated Relationship with Galaxy’s Edge: Black Spire

    In this essay (which is actually just the next four paragraphs) I will explain why I wasn’t immediately a hater of the concept of Galaxy’s Edge tie-in literature.

    Star Wars lit, by its very nature is tie-in literature. Primarily, the

    Review originally posted:

    Book Review: My Complicated Relationship with Galaxy’s Edge: Black Spire

    In this essay (which is actually just the next four paragraphs) I will explain why I wasn’t immediately a hater of the concept of Galaxy’s Edge tie-in literature.

    Star Wars lit, by its very nature is tie-in literature. Primarily, the stories tie-in to the movies, but we’ve seen plenty of books that connect with the TV shows or video games. We’ve even seen some experimentation with tying in with the comics, with the recent Alphabet Squadron – TIE Fighter crossover. So that’s a paragraph of words. Hang onto that.

    Star Wars, by its very nature, has always been experimental. The original movie captured so many fans’ attention because it pushed the boundaries of what movies could do with special effects. The Phantom Menace created Jar Jar! Rogue One brought Peter Cushing back to life!! Whether or not you appreciate the decisions themselves, the Star Wars franchise has always been about pushing boundaries, trying new things, getting ~~experimental~~

    When Star Wars announced their Galaxy’s Edge line of novels with the reasoning of “it’s so that fans who can’t go to the parks can still experience the parks,” I think it was pretty obvious to all of us that the translation of that reasoning was “it’$ $o that fan$ who can’t go the park$ can $till experience the park$.”

    But also, go back to paragraphs two and three and mash those together. What happens when you combine a franchise whose lit is by nature tie-in lit and which is always pushing the boundaries of new and unique ways to tell stories? By golly, I daresay you end up with novels that tie into a theme park! And that’s why, despite the capitalistic cash grab alarm bells going off in my head, I was kind of curious to see how they went about with this new and experimental way of creating tie-in literature.

    Black Spire is a good Star Wars book! I enjoyed it! Especially because, right now, I’m so hungry for post-The Last Jedi content to hold me over before we all get TROSed. And yes, of course, this novel doesn’t give us any big information on what Rey, Leia, Finn, Poe, Rose, Chewie, Nien, the Abednedo dude, Konnix, and that Porg are up to after escaping Crait. But, much like the Aftermath series, it paints a picture of the state of the galaxy, and tells a story about the challenges of recruiting “regular” people into the galaxy-wide conflict when those “regular” people are just trying to afford their groceries (or as we all know they are called in space, “sproceries”). So that’s cool.

    The thing is, if I were reviewing this book as simply a post-TLJ novel and nothing more, I would say that its strongest point was the world-building. Vi and friends go to a planet I’ve never heard of, and over the course of the novel, we learn about the culture, the people, the landscape. And I come to empathize with the plight of the residents, and maybe come to want to visit that planet myself someday!

    Problem is, we’re all suffering from a little Batuu-fatigue, since all of the sudden, every character in every Star Wars property has some reason to visit or mention that “backwater outpost.” So, every time a detail is dropped, a detail that in any other novel would be considered standard world-building fare, all I see are dollar signs. “Vi went to Oga’s cantina and ordered a Black Spire Brew” OH MY GOD I GET IT I’LL GO TO OGA’s CANTINA AND BUY THE BLACK SPIRE BREW WHEN I GO TO THE THEME PARK.

    So what is it? World-building? Or just a straight up commercial for things you should look for when you sell your firstborn and go the Star Wars land? Probably both.

    In the end, I wasn’t able to separate the two in my mind. And, for better or worse, that hindered my enjoyment of the novel some. But not entirely. Because there are a few other reasons to enjoy this book, which I will describe in Part Three, happening on the next line of this book review.

    Some non-Galaxy’s Edge-related reasons you may enjoy this book.

    Did you like Phasma? I liked Phasma. Well this hasn’t really been advertised, and I’m not sure why because a lot of people seemed to like Phasma, but this book is definitely a direct sequel to Phasma. Two major characters’ stories continue onwards in this novel (spoiler alert: Phasma isn’t one of them). And it’s a pretty good continuation of their story. Except for that their relationship kind of makes me uncomfy. But maybe you’re into that kind of thing?

    This book addresses PTSD! Mental health in Star Wars! We don’t see that much! Does it do it well? I don’t know. I’ll leave that commentary to the folks who have PTSD themselves. But it’s nice to see an author making an effort!

    What happens when your small band of Resistance fighters trying to save the galaxy from the soul-crushing hoards of pseudo-fascist children puts out a distress call and no one responds? You gotta RECRUIT! This book is about that, but I already kind of addressed that.

    Basically, what I’m getting at, is that this book is about more than just a list of things you can buy at Galaxy’s Edge. But it’s also a list of things you can buy at Galaxy’s Edge. So my recommendation is to buy it and read it. Or not. You have free will, so it’s up to you.

  • Matthew Sciarrino

    If you have been to or plan to go to Disney’s Galaxy’s Edge then this book is truly a must read. It is the backdrop, and setting for the land known as Black Spires Outpost on the planet Batuu. It leads into the ride that will be the Rise of the Resistance. You learn the back story of Vi, a character at the BSO. You learn about the locations, the people and stores and even the food at BSO.

    If you aren’t going to Disney, then this is still a great story of the Rise of the Resistance and is a prequ

    If you have been to or plan to go to Disney’s Galaxy’s Edge then this book is truly a must read. It is the backdrop, and setting for the land known as Black Spires Outpost on the planet Batuu. It leads into the ride that will be the Rise of the Resistance. You learn the back story of Vi, a character at the BSO. You learn about the locations, the people and stores and even the food at BSO.

    If you aren’t going to Disney, then this is still a great story of the Rise of the Resistance and is a prequel to the Rise of Skywalker.

  • Chris Wermeskerch

    +I like Vi and I like Archex...

    -but I never truly understood Archex's motivations

    -and his characterization is mostly told to us, not really shown. We're told he's smart but we never really see that...

    +World building was done well and it mostly didn't feel like a commercial for Galaxy's Edge,

    -but the prose was extremely repetitive ( @Weed Demon Klaud there's an example at the end which made it feel even worse)

    +I liked seeing Archex and Vi together

    -but the premise of how they were set up made me u

    +I like Vi and I like Archex...

    -but I never truly understood Archex's motivations

    -and his characterization is mostly told to us, not really shown. We're told he's smart but we never really see that...

    +World building was done well and it mostly didn't feel like a commercial for Galaxy's Edge,

    -but the prose was extremely repetitive ( @Weed Demon Klaud there's an example at the end which made it feel even worse)

    +I liked seeing Archex and Vi together

    -but the premise of how they were set up made me uncomfortable

    -and they never spent a great deal of time together, either

    +I liked the side characters

    -but I didn't get the Brooklyn 99 feel that she kept promoting?

    -Kath was so boring, yet another generic First Order officer.

    -----The torture scene was super gratuitous for its length and made me extremely uncomfortable, do not understand why her books have to be so violent, good lord

  • Peter Hale

    How predictable! Disney makes yet another prequel story to advertise for their theme park. Wasn't

    enough, Iger?

    ?

  • Chicagomel

    They need to just do new Legends books already

  • Unseen Library

    It has come to my attention that I might have recently developed a slight addiction to Star Wars expanded fiction. Why else would I go out of my way to read and review four of the Star Wars books that have been released so far this year, as well as collect a huge number of Star Wars comics? The obvious answer is that Star Wars is awesome and all the tie-in media I have read are freakin’ spectacular, with some fantastic stories that feature so many of the franchise’s iconic characters. So far thi

    It has come to my attention that I might have recently developed a slight addiction to Star Wars expanded fiction. Why else would I go out of my way to read and review four of the Star Wars books that have been released so far this year, as well as collect a huge number of Star Wars comics? The obvious answer is that Star Wars is awesome and all the tie-in media I have read are freakin’ spectacular, with some fantastic stories that feature so many of the franchise’s iconic characters. So far this year I have reviewed the 2019 releases Queen’s Shadow, Master and Apprentice, Alphabet Squadron and Thrawn: Treason, as well as several Star Wars books and comics that were released in previous years. Of these, Thrawn: Treason was probably my favourite; however, the year is far from over, and there are still a number of awesome Star Wars novels and comics set to be released.

    For this week’s Waiting on Wednesday, I am looking at some of the top upcoming Star Wars tie-in media releases coming out later this year. Many of these books are tied into the upcoming Star Wars movie, The Rise of Skywalker, and I am curious about what sort of plot hints or tie-in elements will be included as a result. Each of these upcoming releases sound pretty amazing and I will be reading and reviewing all of them in the coming months, no matter what.

    Black Spire is the second book in Star War’s Galaxy’s Edge mini-series, which serves as a tie-in to the new Disneyland park of the same name (where I will be going to in a few weeks). Black Spire is written by intriguing author Delilah S. Dawson, who has previously written a couple of official Star Wars short stories, as well as 2017’s Phasma.

    I like the sound of this book’s plot. A small group of rogues and thieves battling against overwhelming odds is pretty classic Star Wars fare, and it looks like Dawson has an excellent setting and a cool collection of characters to for the story. Blatant commercialism aside, this does look like it is going to be a rather interesting read, and I am putting in an order for it as we speak.

    For other exciting reviews and content, check out my blog at:

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