The Mysterious Affair at Olivetti: IBM, the CIA, and the Cold War Conspiracy to Shut Down Production of the World's First Desktop Computer

The Mysterious Affair at Olivetti: IBM, the CIA, and the Cold War Conspiracy to Shut Down Production of the World's First Desktop Computer

The never-before-told true account of the design and development of the first desktop computer by the world's most famous high-styled typewriter company, more than a decade before the arrival of the Osborne 1, the Apple 1, the first Intel microprocessor, and IBM's PC5150.The human, business, design, engineering, cold war, and tech story of how the Olivetti company came to...

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Title:The Mysterious Affair at Olivetti: IBM, the CIA, and the Cold War Conspiracy to Shut Down Production of the World's First Desktop Computer
Author:Meryle Secrest
Rating:
Edition Language:English

The Mysterious Affair at Olivetti: IBM, the CIA, and the Cold War Conspiracy to Shut Down Production of the World's First Desktop Computer Reviews

  • Craig Evans

    A family business growing and changing. World War 2. Trysts and deceit. Mechanical and electronic engineering. Marriages and divorces. Geopolitical machinations.

    These set some of the background and content for the authors exploration of the Olivetti corporation, once one of the largest manufacturers of business machines in the world.

    A fascinating read, with much family history and the culmination of great thought and activity in engineering, social activism, art, design, and architecture.

    It

    A family business growing and changing. World War 2. Trysts and deceit. Mechanical and electronic engineering. Marriages and divorces. Geopolitical machinations.

    These set some of the background and content for the authors exploration of the Olivetti corporation, once one of the largest manufacturers of business machines in the world.

    A fascinating read, with much family history and the culmination of great thought and activity in engineering, social activism, art, design, and architecture.

    It did take quite a bit of time to get through the fascinating backstory of the family and business before one got to the last chapter, the one which really got into the gritty information that provided the books subtitle. The fact that what can be considered the worlds first desktop computer was created a decade before Apple and IBM's endeavours is an eye-opener. And given the cold-war sentimatilities of that era there is likely more to the story than is presented.

    Kudos to the author for her investigation and the process that generated this text. (there are several authors and books mentioned in the Acknowledgements that appear to be worthwhile in seeking out for further exploration of the information.)

    Disclosure: I received the advance copy via a give-away on GoodReads.com

  • Dale Bentz

    An interesting read of the trials and successes of the Olivetti dynasty in Italy. While Secrest succeeds as a historian and author, however, she fails as a detective. The conjectures concerning the deaths of key members of the Olivetti team are lacking in any new facts that would elevate them beyond the class of pure speculation. Perhaps one day, the true stories will be uncovered and presented in a new book. Hope so!

  • JDK1962

    I had a special interest in this, since I lived and worked in Ivrea in 1989, at an Olivetti joint venture company. Had I not, I doubt I would have finished this.

    Despite the title, the majority of this book is simply a history of Olivetti, and on that score, I found it interesting. Three chapters before the end, the story turns to the P101 (which the author terms "the world's first desktop computer", which is a pretty weak contention...maybe the world's first programmable calculator, but

    I had a special interest in this, since I lived and worked in Ivrea in 1989, at an Olivetti joint venture company. Had I not, I doubt I would have finished this.

    Despite the title, the majority of this book is simply a history of Olivetti, and on that score, I found it interesting. Three chapters before the end, the story turns to the P101 (which the author terms "the world's first desktop computer", which is a pretty weak contention...maybe the world's first programmable calculator, but anyway), and Olivetti falling upon hard times. Then the last chapter comes along, which is pretty much all conspiracy theory, in which, based on very little (if any) actual hard or non-circumstantial evidence, the author weaves a theory about how a deep dark conspiracy of US and Italian government and economic forces conspired to put a boot on Olivetti's throat and keep it barely limping along for another few decades.

    Suffice it to say that I didn't buy any of the conspiracy theory. One would have to completely discard Occam's Razor (as well as the saying "never ascribe to malice that which may be adequately explained by stupidity") to buy the final chapter. Italian economics/bureaucracy, mediocre management of a family company, and internal factions fighting for turf were more than sufficient to doom the P101.

  • Harley

    I did not finish this book. I read up to page 73 and had to stop.

    The cover and description are beautiful. There is so much excitement and intrigue in both. However, it feels like Meryle and her marketing team have two different agendas. The book is written in a very dry tone and discusses politics and architecture quite a bit. And while these both have a part in the main story, I felt as if I were reading through a bunch of Wikipedia articles.

    I wanted to keep reading, but increasingly found

    I did not finish this book. I read up to page 73 and had to stop.

    The cover and description are beautiful. There is so much excitement and intrigue in both. However, it feels like Meryle and her marketing team have two different agendas. The book is written in a very dry tone and discusses politics and architecture quite a bit. And while these both have a part in the main story, I felt as if I were reading through a bunch of Wikipedia articles.

    I wanted to keep reading, but increasingly found myself dreading reading more of this book.

  • Sean S

    Having little background on Olivetti, I found myself simultaneously intrigued and disappointed by this book. The premise of the story is that Olivetti invented the first PC as we generally recognize the term, and there was some nefarious intelligence play to shut it down. The reality of this book is as follows:

    * haphazard background on various parts of the Olivetti clan, with weak writing mixed in

    * eventually getting to the PC part and realizing the machine was cutting edge but not the PC we

    Having little background on Olivetti, I found myself simultaneously intrigued and disappointed by this book. The premise of the story is that Olivetti invented the first PC as we generally recognize the term, and there was some nefarious intelligence play to shut it down. The reality of this book is as follows:

    * haphazard background on various parts of the Olivetti clan, with weak writing mixed in

    * eventually getting to the PC part and realizing the machine was cutting edge but not the PC we think of

    * random speculation which adds nothing in the way of credibility in the final chapters as to why he died on the train that day

    Skip the book and Google the matter. You will get there quicker with the same results.

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