Smoke and Stone

Smoke and Stone

After a cataclysmic war of the gods, the last of humanity huddles in Bastion, a colossal ringed city. Beyond the outermost wall lies endless desert haunted by the souls of all the world’s dead.Trapped in a rigid caste system, Nuru, a young street sorcerer, lives in the outer ring. She dreams of escape and freedom. When something contacts her from beyond the wall, she risks...

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Title:Smoke and Stone
Author:Michael R. Fletcher
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Smoke and Stone Reviews

  • Jon Adams

    This might just be the most unique world-building I've ever read. Bastion is incredible. I'd put it on the same level as The Tower of Babel in Bancroft's books.

    Rich, developed characters, some great twists, an amazing plot, and top notch world-building. What's not to love? I can't wait to explore more of Bastion!

    Damn the man!

    Thank you to Mr. Fletcher for the ARC. Hopefully I worked some of that debt off, but I'll still be buying the book when it comes out.

  • FanFiAddict

    Rating:

    Synopsis

    After a cataclysmic war of the gods, the last of humanity huddles in Bastion, a colossal ringed city. Beyond the outermost wall lies endless desert haunted by the souls of all the world’s dead.

    Trapped in a rigid caste system, Nuru, a young street sorcerer, lives in the outer ring. She dreams of escape and freedom. When something contacts her from beyond the wall, she risks everything and leaps at the opportunity. Mother Death, a banished god seeking to reclaim her place in

    Rating: ★★★★★

    Synopsis

    After a cataclysmic war of the gods, the last of humanity huddles in Bastion, a colossal ringed city. Beyond the outermost wall lies endless desert haunted by the souls of all the world’s dead.

    Trapped in a rigid caste system, Nuru, a young street sorcerer, lives in the outer ring. She dreams of escape and freedom. When something contacts her from beyond the wall, she risks everything and leaps at the opportunity. Mother Death, a banished god seeking to reclaim her place in Bastion’s patchwork pantheon, has found her way back into the city.

    Akachi, born to the wealth and splendour of Bastion’s inner rings, is a priest of Cloud Serpent, Lord of the Hunt. A temple-trained sorcerer, he is tasked with bringing peace to the troublesome outer ring. Drawn into a dark and violent world of assassins, gangs, and street sorcerers, he battles the spreading influence of Mother Death in a desperate attempt to save Bastion.

    The gods are once again at war.

    Review

    Thanks to the author for an advance reading copy of Smoke and Stone (City of Sacrifice #1) in exchange for an honest review. Receiving this eARC did not influence my thoughts or opinions on the novel.

    Ancient, bloodthirsty gods, street sorcerers, rival gangs, faith, and sacrifice all come to play a part is this dark and original tale from one of the best in the biz. It’s bloody, enthralling, and grimdark as f*ck.

    I have to preface my review by stating that I, along with Petros of Booknest, alpha, beta, gamma, delta, etc. read Smoke & Stone, gave my thoughts on world-building, characters, the beginning and ending, and even slapped Michael around in regard to the cover design. He was a good sport for the most part.

    Having read all of the author’s previous works, I knew that I could expect a grim and bloody tour de force of a novel, but I didn’t expect all of the intricacies the author mixed in to create a truly original story. The use of hallucinogens and wood/stone carvings to morph into god-like creatures, and even gods themselves, and leaving chaos and destruction in their wake. The uniqueness of the world-building as the entirety of it is made of separate but equal rings, each with a significant role to play in the story and its sequels.

    I also enjoyed the growth of the characters, especially Akachi. Seeing how he morphed from page 1 to the intense climax makes for a very intriguing read, especially knowing his roots from the first draft. I also enjoyed how the dynamics of Nuru and the members of her caste played out, never seeming to have an edge until just the right moment.

    You never quite know what to expect when it comes to Fletcher’s books, but one thing you do know for sure is that you are in for the ride of your life. I still, to this day, do not understand why he, among several other indie authors, is not a more mainstream name when it comes to fantasy/grimdark. I get that his material is pitch-black dark and he uses quite coarse language to get his message across, but Abercrombie seems to do well from what I can see. Fletcher needs to be a household name, and anyone who believes Anna Smith Spark’s and Ed McDonald’s books are phenomenal need to give Beyond Redemption & The Mirror’s Truth a go, let alone Smoke & Stone.

  • Justine

    From beyond the realm of mankind the gods scheme. Father Death remains withdrawn in his sanctuary of the underworld, while the arrival of Mother Death at the towering walls of Bastion from the wasteland of the Bloody Desert marks the beginning of the end. A priest of many talents challenges a street sorcerer of great power, both whose strings are being pulled by their puppet masters. What’s

    From beyond the realm of mankind the gods scheme. Father Death remains withdrawn in his sanctuary of the underworld, while the arrival of Mother Death at the towering walls of Bastion from the wasteland of the Bloody Desert marks the beginning of the end. A priest of many talents challenges a street sorcerer of great power, both whose strings are being pulled by their puppet masters. What’s believed to be a campaign for freedom from persecution may lead to absolute annihilation as the gods wage war once again.

    is the newest ultra Grimdark title from the incomparable Michael R. Fletcher, and is a raw and visceral tale of abuse and vengeful gods. Its pages seep with the concept that rules of religion and society are created by man, and are therefore flawed. That those crushed under the boot of oppression are viciously blinded by a false sense of security, and will only be led to ruin. And those same that are victimized have the power to break down the walls of injustice, as only one voice is needed to spark a revolution. In all honesty, I never know what to expect when cracking open one of Fletcher’s novels, owing to the fact that blurbs aren’t capable of giving the work’s entirety its due.

    is no different in this regard, and not only were my expectations met, but completely surpassed with this brilliant initiation into the

    series.

    Set in a unique and finely crafted world decimated by war, rich in both history and beliefs evocative of Mesoamerican culture, this story is suffused with ageless deities of endless monikers determined to topple the current structure of the pantheon. These renewed and ongoing battles between fickle gods threaten to trigger bloodshed between men, revealing well-kept secrets that will surely shatter the fabric of society. Devoted priesthoods and heretical assassins, savage street magic fueled by carefully formulated concoctions of narcotics and divine will, public sacrificial rituals to appease blood-thirsty gods, the worldbuilding in this book is both astonishing and impeccable.

    Structure leads to stagnation. Control leads to abuse.

    Bastion, the last remaining haven for humankind, is a sprawling concentric city miraculously constructed of a single stone. The gods inhabit the center, and each subsequent ring houses those of lesser wealth and importance. The Growers, known as Dirts to their “betters”, inhabit the largest and outermost ring, and are essentially the slaves of the community. They’re worked to the bone to produce food for those in the inner rings, and in return they’re fed, clothed, and given shelter – as scant as it all may be. This is the life they’ve been taught to know, all they’ve grown accustomed to, living in discomfort and fear. However, the acrid scent of rebellion drifts upon the warm and dusty winds. Surrounded by the Bloody Desert, where all manner of lost souls and demons and exiled gods lurk, the walls of Bastion are the only means of preventing perpetual misery and death.

    In addition to meticulously superb worldbuilding, this book excels at portraying tragically flawed and broken characters. The story mainly focuses on two sorcerers that fall on each end of the city’s social spectrum. Nuru is an unfortunate Grower, but an insanely powerful street sorcerer. While she’s naturally beautiful and intensely influential to those she silently leads, she has a complete lack of confidence, viewing herself as ordinary, which she is most certainly not. Akachi is an interim priest of the god Cloud Serpent. Overly sure in his many mystical abilities, he’s terrified of disappointing his father, High Priest of Cloud Serpent, with his performance at his temple deep within the Growers’ Ring. Unwilling to request help, he’s prepared to sacrifice everyone and everything in order to complete the task set before him. Furthermore, a strong and dynamic supporting cast not only adds depth to the story, but also to our main POV characters. For fear of giving too much away, I’ll leave them for you become acquainted with yourself.

    The world is coming apart. The smoke never lied.

    Fletcher is a master of immersion with a level of twisted creativity most could only hope to strive for. As soon as I began reading the first chapter, I was immediately hooked and unable to put the book down. A narrative dominated by captivating lyrical prose and lucid descriptions bathing you in the filth of Bastion made this an addictive read that I hoped would never end. I could feel the harsh grit of the desert sand and the stickiness of blood baking in the sun. I could sense the encompassing fear of the horrors lurking in the shadows and the strangled hope for a brighter tomorrow. Riddles presented by the gods are not only for characters to decipher, but for readers to decode, as well. A strong, solid plot riddled with shocking twists left me slack-jawed and craving more. Diving into one of his books is more than just an enrapturing read, it’s an enveloping experience in which no review could possibly prepare you for.

    What an intense and extraordinary way to begin a new series. We’re left with the fate of all hanging in the balance, and I cannot wait to continue my journey through the cramped and drab streets of the Growers’ Ring as the chaos infiltrates further inwards.

    will be available September 13, 2019, so make sure you pre-order your copy now!

    A huge thank you to the author for an advanced copy of this book.

  • Chris

    Holy Smoke! (and Stone) was that a wild ride…

    Michael R. Fletcher makes his return to grimdark fantasy in fine fashion, introducing us to a fascinating new world, different from that in his brilliant

    series. If you enjoyed the world-building and backstabbery of that series, you’ll love this one just as much. It’s the first book in the

    series, set entirely in the city of Bastion, which to its inhabitants comprises the entire known world.

    Bastion sets on a single

    Holy Smoke! (and Stone) was that a wild ride…

    Michael R. Fletcher makes his return to grimdark fantasy in fine fashion, introducing us to a fascinating new world, different from that in his brilliant

    series. If you enjoyed the world-building and backstabbery of that series, you’ll love this one just as much. It’s the first book in the

    series, set entirely in the city of Bastion, which to its inhabitants comprises the entire known world.

    Bastion sets on a single stone, which covers a diameter of about 250 miles. A quarter of a million people live here, separated by several walls which ring around the core, where the priests live. It’s an elaborate caste system, where the farther out one lives from the center, the more poor and numerous.

    Smoke and Stone takes place mostly in the Grower’s Ring, where the food for the city is harvested by, you guessed it, the Growers. The poorest in this society, Growers are given very few (if any) amenities, but several things that are listed as being punishable. It’s actually a crime for them to own chairs, so most of them flip unused boxes over to have something to secretly sit on. The Growers are seen as too stupid to do anything but grow food, so their children are taken away at birth and raised (to be Growers) away from their birth parents.

    As one can guess, the priests control everything in the name of the gods. But it turns out, the gods have a hand in things, and some of them aren’t so happy with how it’s all turned out. Seems that thousands of years ago there was a big war between these gods and the walls of Bastion are all that protects humanity’s survivors from, well, whatever horrors are out there.

    In our story, we have two protagonists and the narrative alternates between their two perspectives. First we have Akachi, a young member of the priesthood that is being assigned a parish in the Wheat District, where he will be expected to guide souls until a real priest can be found to take over (the last few met pretty horrific ends, so Akachi is not expected to last long). Secondly, we have Nuru, a street sorcerer from the Grower's Ring, where the Wheat District is located. She’s a member of a small gang that roams the streets of the District and are becoming aware of and unhappy about the status quo in the city of Bastion.

    The magic system is pretty awesome and unique. Nuru and Akachi are both practitioners, though they use their skills in different ways. There are narcotics which are taken in to gift/enhance the user and enable them to do all sorts of wicked things. This is another trademark of Fletcher fantasy, in that he puts a lot of thought and creativity into a magic system that’s very different from what’s already out there.

    This novel then gives us the stories of both of our young protagonists as they learn the ins and outs of their mutual district from opposite perspectives. They both have a cast of side characters that are quite interesting, and we follow all of these through the story to its ending. All I will say about that is that’s it’s pretty Michael R. Fletchery in nature, so be prepared to feel like breaking something.

  • Twerking To Beethoven

    Here it is. Woot!

    Given I suck at reviews, I guess I'll take the liberty of telling a little story. Some of my GR contacts had the honour of reading this book before its official release. I basically commented on one of the reviews, asking where/how they got the book (oi,

    ) and, go figure, not even five minutes later,

    himself messaged me to let me know he'd send me a copy if I fancied one.

    I told him "Hell no!" because, whenever someone gives me something for

    Here it is. Woot!

    Given I suck at reviews, I guess I'll take the liberty of telling a little story. Some of my GR contacts had the honour of reading this book before its official release. I basically commented on one of the reviews, asking where/how they got the book (oi,

    ) and, go figure, not even five minutes later,

    himself messaged me to let me know he'd send me a copy if I fancied one.

    I told him "Hell no!" because, whenever someone gives me something for free, I'll feel compelled to be nice to them. So, in case the book had turned out to be a monumental trainwreck, I would have never had the brass nerve to say so on GR. Especially when the author is a nice bloke, and Fletcher happens to be a

    nice bloke. I mean, how could I go apeshit and call "Smoke and Stone" all the available grabastic mixes of turds under the sun?

    Right, well, the book is bloody good. Next time, Fletcher. Next time.

  • Adam

    Twenty-five thousand years has passed since the walled city of Bastion was created. The whole of mankind lives within this city of stone for protection against the cataclysmic wasteland beyond. Bastion is built of concentric circles with walls between each ring, and passages between these rings are closely guarded by warrior

    Twenty-five thousand years has passed since the walled city of Bastion was created. The whole of mankind lives within this city of stone for protection against the cataclysmic wasteland beyond. Bastion is built of concentric circles with walls between each ring, and passages between these rings are closely guarded by warrior priests. The farmers make up the outer ring; this is the most populated region but also the most heavily oppressed class of people. Each ring closer to the center has a little more freedom, a little more wealth, and is a little closer to the gods. Class divide could not be more literal than this.

    When Bastion was built, there was a war of the gods, and only a few survived within the city walls. These gods ascended to the pantheon of the city, becoming the mainstay religion for all mankind. Priests are dispatched to lead the people into lives of holiness, but not everyone agrees with the how these traditions are upheld.

    Drugs are the spark that fuels the inferno of power in this city. The book has its own glossary of hallucinogens and herbs, and

    , or even talk to their god. Power and abilities are pulled from smoke or stone, depending on where your allegiance lies. As you may have gleaned by now, the world-building is as detailed as it is impressive.

    Even more impressive is how well the characters are developed for a cast of substantial size. There are only two POVs in this story: Akachi, a newly-minted pastor of a run-down church in a dangerous district, and Nuru, a gang member and street sorcerer trying to survive in a world where showing any form of individuality can be punishable by death. We alternate chapters throughout the book and learn much about what drives them both, but we also get to know their respective crews well enough where I felt strongly connected with many of these supporting characters. And since this is a Michael Fletcher book, we all know that there will be a happy ending for everyone, right? Right.

    While Fletcher’s grim tales certainly aren’t for everyone, he remains one of my favorite authors, and

    keeps that streak alive.

    Bring on the sequel.

    ARC via author.

  •  Charlie - A Reading Machine

    Smoke and Stone is a fast-paced,

    Smoke and Stone is a fast-paced, narcotic-laced, titanic-sized struggle between gods where the final city of man is the playing field and champions will determine who will live, rule and prosper, and who will die. Bastion is the arena and was created by the gods to be an oasis of faith in an otherwise dead world, a way to concentrate the prayers, the souls and the blood of mankind so that it may sustain them for as long as possible.

    The story is told through the two POVs of Nuru and Akachi. Each have different beginnings but very similar stories.

    Nuru is part of a street crew in the poorest ring on Bastion. She is a Grower, a ‘dirt’, and her lot in life is to work, produce and die. If she were to have any children she would never know their identity. Nuru is also a street sorcerer and using various combinations of drugs, powders, seeds and fungi can manipulate the world around her, make contact with the spirit world and become the physical manifestation of the animal totems she carves. When she receives a vision of jade warriors with swords of obsidian marching though her ring, carving her friends from gullet to gut, the blood funnelling down perfectly formed gutters towards to the innermost ring where the Gods reside, she knows she must seek a different path to change.

    Akachi is a young man of the cloth desperate to live up to his father’s accomplishments, and when he is sent to the Growers ring to reopen an abandoned church and bring the gods to the masses he senses an opportunity to do so. Armed with his own totems and the unshakable insanity of someone who is receiving messages from a god known as The Cloud Serpent he sets out to capture a young scarred girl who he believes is the key to avoiding his visions of death and destruction and ensuring his rise through the church. Nuru has sensed the same girl, though, and for her and her crew she might be the spark that will ignite a revolution.

    I absolutely loved this first instalment of the City of Sacrifice series. It is an exciting and heart-pounding narrative, pared back so the reader barely has time to take a breath. I feel like Fletcher has done more in a little over 300 pages than a lot of writers can do in 500 but I never felt I was missing out on anything. At the start of each new chapter readers are given a small piece of backstory to grow their sense of the world and the stakes, but the story moves at a lightning pace with a focus on the characters and keeping them moving forward. Upon finishing, I stumbled upon the glossary and realised over half of the terms were not even used in this first book, and all it did was make me hungry for the rest. It’s all there. Every drug, every type of magic, and every god, it is as intricately detailed as possible and shows there is a hell of a lot of scope left in this story.

    Smoke and Stone is grimdark, it’s post-apocalyptic, it’s surreal as hell. If there is any justice in this world it should find no trouble finding an audience. If you have read Beyond Redemption you’ll know how committed and invested Fletcher is when he builds his world and the amazing depth he achieves. In this world we have a brilliant combination of The Poppy War, The Books of Babel and The Cabin in the Woods. We have tons of drug-induced magic, a city that is set up in ringdoms each with their own identity, and a people that must live with the constant threat of gods living and fighting beneath them. I highly recommend picking up a copy of this exciting new series and I can’t wait to see where Fletcher takes Nuru, Akachi and the city of Bastion.

  • Petrik

    It’s surreal, but as it turns out, it’s been two years and approximately two hundred books since I’ve read anything new by Fletcher. It’s a serious shame that after all this time, Fletcher still hasn’t received the fame and recognition he deserves. When it comes to grimdark fantasy, I find that George R. R. Martin, Joe Abercrombie, Mark Lawrence, and Steven Erikson tend to

    It’s surreal, but as it turns out, it’s been two years and approximately two hundred books since I’ve read anything new by Fletcher. It’s a serious shame that after all this time, Fletcher still hasn’t received the fame and recognition he deserves. When it comes to grimdark fantasy, I find that George R. R. Martin, Joe Abercrombie, Mark Lawrence, and Steven Erikson tend to be the most often mentioned names; for many good reasons. However, I do strongly believe that Fletcher should be equally ranked as high as them. I am drowning in books to read, but when Fletcher asked me to read and review his newest book, I accepted, started, and finished reading it immediately within two days.

    is the first book in Fletcher’s brand new

    series; it is completely unrelated to his

    series. If you’re a fan of

    —like me—please don’t let this fact discourage you. Believe me, I’m eagerly waiting for the third and last book in

    too, but if you’ve read ANY of Fletcher’s previous work, you should already know that

    will still be infused with insanely morbid and compelling imagination. Now, what’s the premise of this book? I’ll let a small passage from the very early stages of the book describe it for you:

    You read that right, the setting of the story takes place in a city formed on a single piece of stone. I don’t know about you, but I honestly don’t think I’ve read a fantasy novel with a setting like that before. If you want to know more regarding the premise, check out the official blurb on Goodreads/Amazon; they’re completely spoiler-free and informative. Fletcher has mentioned in the acknowledgment section that he narrowed the number of perspectives to two characters: Akachi and Nuru. I didn’t read the multi-POV version, but what I’ve read here was fantastic and utterly well-plotted.

    at its core portrayed what happened when different factions of different social statuses and faiths clash with each other. Akachi is a priest of Cloud Serpent (Lord of the Hunt), and he’s a temple-trained sorcerer who came from the inner ring of Bastion; rich, and living more glamorously, he’s tasked to bring peace to the outer ring of Bastion. Nuru is a street sorcerer who came from the outer ring of Bastion. What made the clash and rivalry between these two characters so engaging and interesting to read for me was because of, in a way, their personalities and situations were similar. What ended up separating them and causing the deadly conflict between these two characters and groups were the difference in caste, upbringing, and faith.

    The world-building, magic system, and actions were incredible as you can probably expect from Fletcher. Each chapter begins with an epigraph that helps flesh out the intricate lore and inventive magic system of the series. It would be incomplete for a fantasy book by Fletcher to not have a magic system that’s considerably fucked up and yet original. Akachi smokes narcotics and Nuru uses crystal stones to activate her magic; hence, one of the main reasons why the book is titled

    . I found double-edged madness-fueled narcotics as a magic system to be something that’s incredibly brilliant. The magic systems—such as shape-shifting, dream-walking, etc—made the battle and turmoils between the avatars of warring gods destructive and visceral to read. I personally think that the book has a slightly steeper learning curve—make sure to check the glossary at the back of the book if you feel confused, I wish I had known about this!—compared to

    , but once I got the hang of things, the novel became satisfyingly difficult to put down.

    is post-apocalyptic fantasy magnificence; it redefined and intensified the notion that grimdark fantasy is truly Fletcher’s domain of expertise.

    ,

    , and now

    , I’ve read all of Fletcher’s full novels, and I can vouch for their quality; none of them had ever received a rating of below 4 stars from me. It’s always a 4-5 stars rating, and this stunning first book in

    keeps up that tradition. As always, I recommend this, and ALL of Fletcher’s works, to readers who love reading grimdark fantasy.

  • Lukasz

    In ancient times, healers and shamans used hallucinogenic substances to break their mental shackles and achieve transcendence. In Fletcher’s world,

    . It helps them to produce psychedelic sensations of time-space displacement or transformation into beasts. Their narcotic-shaped realities intrude upon the real world and give them preternatural skills.

    The world as we know it no longer exists. After a cataclysmic war of

    In ancient times, healers and shamans used hallucinogenic substances to break their mental shackles and achieve transcendence. In Fletcher’s world,

    . It helps them to produce psychedelic sensations of time-space displacement or transformation into beasts. Their narcotic-shaped realities intrude upon the real world and give them preternatural skills.

    The world as we know it no longer exists. After a cataclysmic war of the gods, the last humanity huddles in

    , a colossal ringed city whose structure reflects its social stratification. Unprivileged inhabit the outer rings rife with violence, poverty, and crime. Wealthy and powerful live in the inner rings enjoying the relative luxury and power. Beyond the city walls lies an endless desert.

    The story follows two sorcerers whose paths intertwine.

    , a young street sorcerer, dreams of escape from the outer ring and freedom. It seems her talents caught the attention of

    who seeks to reclaim her place in the Bastion’s Pantheon.

    is a priest of Cloud Serpent, Lord of the Hunt, tasked with bringing peace to the troublesome outer ring in which Nuru lives. They serve different gods and each of them is just a pawn in game humans can’t understand.

    and does to his characters what you expect from him - he puts them through hell and ruins them.

    Fletcher doesn’t write for the squeamish, and he relishes ruining his characters as they step into madness or self-destruction. And yet, like his other books, Smoke and Stone is an addictive read thanks to a unique setting and a plot full of twisted reveals.

    Beyond the awesomeness of the premise (ringed and socially stratified city, human sorcerers as proxies to warring gods, crystal and drug-induced magic) and the moral complexities of characters’ choices, Smoke and Stone truly shines in terms of its ensemble cast. Both POV characters remain convincing and tragic, with no good choices ahead of them. After having a vision of a mythical creature (a hybrid between spider and women) Nuru is obsessed with carving its statue. Sorcerers are able to shape-shift into creatures they carve. She just needs to get some paint and tools to finish the work.

    Because of the events I can't mention (spoilers), Akashi is afraid to lose control of his life. He trashes himself on drugs, mixing them to gain preternatural skills and fight with his insecurities:

    Secondary characters stand out as well, especially a mysterious girl known as

    who bounces between cold self-interest and a desperate yearning to belong. She doesn’t believe in half-measures and behaves like a blood-thirsty lunatic but she's also smart. I won’t lie. She scares me.

    I’ve mentioned the world-building. I love the concept of the city, but the magic system based on hallucinogenics and crystals impressed me even more. I mean, there are twenty different drugs used by sorcerers to do magic and each of them has a different effect. Skilfull sorcerers mix them to prepare themselves for special feats.

    The only real complaints I have for this book are two-fold. First, I wished that there was a little more attention devoted to the worldbuilding and society stratification and its explanation. What we get is enough to follow the story and understand the tensions between casts but I would love to learn more. Second, the prose, while precise and providing the information we need, sometimes feels too casual.

    Other than that, I found Smoke and Stone enthralling and unpredictable. It has it all. A solid plot, a unique magic system, fascinating world, and memorable characters. Oh, and if you're fond of familiars in your fantasy, Nuru has one. A black viper named Isabis. A sweet creature, really. I have no idea why Nuru's friends feel uncomfortable when she's caressing the snake's scales :)

  • Michael Fletcher

    IT. IS. ALIVE!!!!!!

    Smoke and Stone is published and shipping in both print and digital! The audio book will follow in December!

    Another quickie update: Grimdark Magazine did a cover reveal for me (

    ) and now the cover is live and uploaded (hopefully) to all the places I'm supposed to upload it.

    Quickie update: Just received this amazing blurb!

    "A breakneck story of flawed priests and psychotic revolutionaries set in a world

    IT. IS. ALIVE!!!!!!

    Smoke and Stone is published and shipping in both print and digital! The audio book will follow in December!

    Another quickie update: Grimdark Magazine did a cover reveal for me (

    ) and now the cover is live and uploaded (hopefully) to all the places I'm supposed to upload it.

    Quickie update: Just received this amazing blurb!

    "A breakneck story of flawed priests and psychotic revolutionaries set in a world filled with drugs, shape-shifting, and caste warfare. The fertile soil of mesoamerican mythology, warped through the lens of Fletcher's own hyperkinetic imagination, yields hypnotic, terrifying results."

    --

    , author of the

    !

    Once I've finished freaking out, it's back to working on book two, ASH AND BONE.

    The insanely talented FELIX ORTIZ (

    ) has finished work on the cover art! And holy crap is it awesome! I am blown away by this dude's work. I'm currently hard at work doing the cover typography.

    Reveal to come soon at Grimdark Magazine!

    It's official! The pre-orders for SMOKE AND STONE are now live!

    I'll work on getting the print version ready while I bang away at ASH AND BONE, the second book in the City of Sacrifice series.

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