Nighttime Parenting (Revised): How to Get Your Baby and Child to Sleep

Nighttime Parenting (Revised): How to Get Your Baby and Child to Sleep

Parenting is a job that goes on twenty-four hours a day. Nighttime Parenting helps parents understand why babies sleep differently than adults, offers solutions to nighttime problems, and even describes how certain styles of nighttime parenting can aid in child spacing and lower the risks of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.Renowned pediatrician Dr. William Sears helps you find a solution t...

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Title:Nighttime Parenting (Revised): How to Get Your Baby and Child to Sleep
Author:William Sears
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Edition Language:English

Nighttime Parenting (Revised): How to Get Your Baby and Child to Sleep Reviews

  • Leigh

    Oh my goodness! Out of all of the Dr. Sears' books I own and have read, this is my utmost favorite! If you plan to nurse your baby (or even if you don't), knowing why and how children sleep differently than adults is SO helpful! This book (and Dr. Sears' research) is very educational and makes a lot of sense. If you think it's right to let your child cry it out (which, by the way, crying is their way of communicating), please read this book. Children are not designed to sleep through the night u

    Oh my goodness! Out of all of the Dr. Sears' books I own and have read, this is my utmost favorite! If you plan to nurse your baby (or even if you don't), knowing why and how children sleep differently than adults is SO helpful! This book (and Dr. Sears' research) is very educational and makes a lot of sense. If you think it's right to let your child cry it out (which, by the way, crying is their way of communicating), please read this book. Children are not designed to sleep through the night until the age of 2 for various reasons like teething, etc. I can tell you that Briscoe is 13 months at the time I'm reviewing this book on here, and nights that his teeth are bugging him... he nurses like a newborn! Other nights, he may have three to four or more hours in between nursings. Being a first-time parent, this book really helped me.

  • Kate

    This book saved my life! I struggled with how to get my children to sleep and worried that I was doing it wrong, or was making a mistake by allowing my children to be in bed with me. This book confirmed that what I was doing was perfectly natural and taught me ways to make it the most enjoyable experience for all of us as well as how to make the transition to the crib. I highly recommend this book. Especially, if you have a colicky or high needs child.

  • polly

    I like Dr. Sears, and I liked this book. If you are totally opposed to co-sleeping (I thought I was until my son was a few months old, and then pragmatism set in....), be forewarned: this is heavy on the co-sleeping. But having been co-sleeping for a while now, I can honestly say I feel much better rested than I ever did before (and have NO idea how many times my son wakes at night--we just go with it and I hardly wake up to feed/nurse him...it is marvelously easy). My husband is the one who enc

    I like Dr. Sears, and I liked this book. If you are totally opposed to co-sleeping (I thought I was until my son was a few months old, and then pragmatism set in....), be forewarned: this is heavy on the co-sleeping. But having been co-sleeping for a while now, I can honestly say I feel much better rested than I ever did before (and have NO idea how many times my son wakes at night--we just go with it and I hardly wake up to feed/nurse him...it is marvelously easy). My husband is the one who encouraged co-sleeping and I'm glad we've done it.

    That said, I read this book AFTER I started and it just helps affirm the good reasons for co-sleeping (also points out that most of the world does this, there's nothing unusual about it, except that our culture just doesn't co-sleep much). Convenience is high on the list, but also the baby's breathing regularity/safety. The benefits, if you are a nursing mother, are tremendous, and he points this out as well. This book also does a nice job of explaining how a baby's sleep habits are different from an adult's--and how it may be unrealistic to expect all babies to sleep through the night (oh, this is so true, at least for some babies!). But rather than to say "accept that you're going to be exhausted" the solution is this: keep the nursing baby in bed.

    Lo and behold, it is true. It really does work. And it's terribly cozy to boot. Sure, I'd LOVE it if my child would sleep through the night. But in the meantime, this is what allows me to get sleep when he doesn't!!!

  • Denise

    Lines I loved:

    It is better to lose sleep over your children when they are little, than to have to stay up worrying about them when they are older.

    Sleep problems occur when your child’s night-waking exceeds your ability to cope.

    One of the greatest gifts you can give your new baby is a home built on the foundation of a stable and fulfilled marriage.

    Calendar parenting simply does not work, and it often produces a short-term gain for a long-term loss.

  • Kelly Cooke

    here's the thing about this book: it's not very helpful, per se, in providing actual suggestions for getting your baby to sleep better. it just isn't. BUT. it is helpful for a specific set of people, of which i am a part.

    if you have decided that you don't want to let your baby 'cry it out' and you believe that sleeping well is a milestone for a baby like sitting up or walking or whatever else, then this book will help you hang on to that decision and belief. (if you HAVE decided to let your bab

    here's the thing about this book: it's not very helpful, per se, in providing actual suggestions for getting your baby to sleep better. it just isn't. BUT. it is helpful for a specific set of people, of which i am a part.

    if you have decided that you don't want to let your baby 'cry it out' and you believe that sleeping well is a milestone for a baby like sitting up or walking or whatever else, then this book will help you hang on to that decision and belief. (if you HAVE decided to let your baby cry it out, then you will not need to look very far for support or for a variety of books to help you do that. most baby sleep books advocate some version of crying it out.)

    if you have a baby that does not sleep well, feel free to call me up. i will commiserate and tell you my own sad stories. if you don't know me or don't have my number, read this book.

    and, i will say here that my baby just recently started sleeping one million times better and it's not because of anything i did or didn't do. i had decided to believe that she would sleep on her own when she was ready and felt safe and it seems like that has worked out to be true. my (awesome) pediatrician told me many months ago that he doesn't think babies have the ability to self-soothe until they are nine months old. my baby started sleeping, literally, the day she turned nine months old. no joke. she now goes to sleep on her own and takes a two hour afternoon nap, hence my lengthy book reviews. hallelujah jesus.

  • Jessie

    This book should have been titled: Cosleep to solve 90% of nighttime problems.

    I learned a few useful things from this book. I enjoyed reading the different baby personality quiz. Aside from that, it was pretty much very cosleeping, attachment parenting, and cosleeping. Oh, and did I mention cosleeping? Yes, bring your baby to your bed and supposedly they will sleep more. Um, unfortunately my baby sleeps just as long next to me as he does in his own bassinet. The difference is that I don't

    This book should have been titled: Cosleep to solve 90% of nighttime problems.

    I learned a few useful things from this book. I enjoyed reading the different baby personality quiz. Aside from that, it was pretty much very cosleeping, attachment parenting, and cosleeping. Oh, and did I mention cosleeping? Yes, bring your baby to your bed and supposedly they will sleep more. Um, unfortunately my baby sleeps just as long next to me as he does in his own bassinet. The difference is that I don't sleep well next to him because he moves around so much, and I wake up stiff from sleeping perfectly still.

    I do like sleeping in the same room - I have certainly noticed some of the benefits this book talks about, such as waking up at the same time, or just before, my baby does each time.

    If you're looking for more good reasons to do attachment parenting, you will enjoy this book. Oh, and make sure you try cosleeping. LOL.

  • SaraLaLa

    This book is all about attachment parenting, and if that style's not for you, you'll hate it. Although I consider myself a very responsive parent (not letting my daughter "cry it out" and spending almost every waking hour of every day with her (and several "I should be sleeping" hours, too)), I don't think I need to have my daughter share a bed with me. Don't get me wrong, it'd be cute to have her crawl into our bed on a Saturday morning when she's 3, and not have to get up and go to her. I don'

    This book is all about attachment parenting, and if that style's not for you, you'll hate it. Although I consider myself a very responsive parent (not letting my daughter "cry it out" and spending almost every waking hour of every day with her (and several "I should be sleeping" hours, too)), I don't think I need to have my daughter share a bed with me. Don't get me wrong, it'd be cute to have her crawl into our bed on a Saturday morning when she's 3, and not have to get up and go to her. I don't think that it's necessary for a parent to have their child sleep in bed with them all night every night.

    The author does provide plenty of evidence for his beliefs, but it still seems a bit too extreme. I found this to be the least helpful of the baby books that I've read. All issues that are covered have the same singular solution: co-sleeping. Any information that the author provided about cribs is outdated. For example, it talks about the use of a drop rail, and those have been banned since 2011. This book was published before that, so it's not the author's fault, but it's important for the reader to know.

  • shanamadele

    Read this book because 1) I got it from Goodwill, 2) I liked what I read in Sears' other books (with caveats) and 3) Boy wasn't sleeping.

    There's little in this book that isn't in Sears' other books. There's a little more science about infant sleep cycles that might help you understand why your child awakens so often. There's a lot more sexism, including tips on natural family planning that made me wonder why they were there.

  • Jamie

    Hmmm. Not a very helpful book. Here's what I learned: you have to be a good parent at night, too! Comfort your baby, nurse your baby, parent your baby to bed, and sleep with your baby. If you're looking for a book to argue the point for attachment parenting and co-sleeping, this is it. But I need to keep looking for a book that explores more options and ideas for sleep...

  • Michelle Rowe

    Seemed geared toward older children. feeling bad for the person who suffered longer than I did with no sleep was about the only thing I got out of this book.

    It's hard to review any of the "sleep books", since none of them worked for us. I started out thinking they were all pretty good, but since I was unable to implement any of their suggestions I may not be the most objective reviewer.

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