The Goldsmith's Daughter

The Goldsmith's Daughter

A bearer of doom, or a bringer of change? As the Aztec empire falls, one girl defies her destiny.In the golden city of Tenochtitlán, the people live in awe of Emperor Montezuma and in fear of blood-hungry gods. Under an ill-fated sky, a girl is born, facing a life of submission and domestic drudgery. But Itacate has a secret passion for goldwork, forbidden to women, and is...

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Title:The Goldsmith's Daughter
Author:Tanya Landman
Rating:
Edition Language:English

The Goldsmith's Daughter Reviews

  • Faith Chin

    This book is fantastic! It really shows a lot of facts about the Aztecs. This story is about a Aztec girl named Itacate. She was 15 when the Spaniards arrive in Mexico (I'm not sure what the place is called then) and started to take over the Aztec cities and empire. Itacate was a talented goldsmith like her dad (though women can't be one). It impressed the king, Montezuma, yet also the leader of the Spaniards, Cortez. Itacate is a very skilled goldsmith, from tiny gold figurines, to massive gold

    This book is fantastic! It really shows a lot of facts about the Aztecs. This story is about a Aztec girl named Itacate. She was 15 when the Spaniards arrive in Mexico (I'm not sure what the place is called then) and started to take over the Aztec cities and empire. Itacate was a talented goldsmith like her dad (though women can't be one). It impressed the king, Montezuma, yet also the leader of the Spaniards, Cortez. Itacate is a very skilled goldsmith, from tiny gold figurines, to massive gold statues for the emperor! Though through her life, her mother died form giving birth to Itacate and then her twin brother Mitotiqui. Itacate has struggled in her life, mourning the deaths of her family. First, her mother who died while giving birth, second her brother who was given as a sacrifice to the gods, third, Fransisco, a very handsome Spaniard whom she fell in love with who was killed by some Aztec warriors, fourth, her own father who was killed by some warriors and lastly, Mayatl, Mitotiqui and Itacate’s nursemaid when they were young, who died of a severe sickness which swept the whole Aztec empire like a dark shadow over the empire. The conflict is of course, Person vs. Person as the whole Aztec Empire has been killed, tortured and ruled over by the Spaniards. Itacate has lost all her loved ones, except Fransisco, he lived in fact. Nothing can stop the Spaniards from taking over the Aztecs. Fransisco, Itacate and Eve (a female dog) ran away to live a new life and Itacate found one thing that the priests had been wrong about, the sun rose without the help of the gods and that means Fransisco’s god and only god, God, it the true god.

  • Carina

    I loved this book.

    Not only did it outline my ideas and images of the Aztec society,

    but it carried on a romance that for me was wonderful.

    Even though this is a rather depressing tale, I think it really does touch on the role of women in society

    as well as the fall of the empire itself.

    Lastly I feel this is not for the faint of heart. It is not a read that will leave you feeling particularly happy

    but more of a sense that the main character is stripped of what she has known her whole life

    I loved this book.

    Not only did it outline my ideas and images of the Aztec society,

    but it carried on a romance that for me was wonderful.

    Even though this is a rather depressing tale, I think it really does touch on the role of women in society

    as well as the fall of the empire itself.

    Lastly I feel this is not for the faint of heart. It is not a read that will leave you feeling particularly happy

    but more of a sense that the main character is stripped of what she has known her whole life

    . But I did still love it because of the angst and portrayal of the

    Aztecan community.

  • Emma

    I found this book when I went to a literature festival where author Tanya Landman was speaking about her books and how they are based on historical events (tribes, societies etc) and this was one of the books she spoke about which I found interesting. I had intended to buy her other book Buffalo Soldier but it was sold out so this was my second choice to get signed.

    I enjoy a mixture of fiction and real history as it makes you think about how it really was at the time and with this being set so f

    I found this book when I went to a literature festival where author Tanya Landman was speaking about her books and how they are based on historical events (tribes, societies etc) and this was one of the books she spoke about which I found interesting. I had intended to buy her other book Buffalo Soldier but it was sold out so this was my second choice to get signed.

    I enjoy a mixture of fiction and real history as it makes you think about how it really was at the time and with this being set so far back it was a refreshing history lesson with exciting plot twists.

    Another thing I particularly like is how despite this character have a LOT of prejudice against her she is the protagonist and we see it through her perspective how strong she actually is challenging the stupidity of prejudice.

    This book whilst was action packed also managed to slip in some romance which I wasn't sure about at first but it did work and my emotions were played with.

    I do have to admit I almost felt like DNFing this book at the beginning as it was quite slow but pushed on and it was worth it. In that respect I would recommend this to more patient readers.

  • Tanita S.

    How often do you run across a book set in the Aztec empire in YA?

  • Shanna Smith

    Another female empowering book, but not as good as "I am Apache."

  • Jasmine

    I enjoyed this book, but I am only giving it 3 stars instead of 4 because I found the historical inaccuracies troubling. I think historical fiction should be based in historical fact as much as possible. The author states that she combined history of Peru and the Carribean in with the history of the Aztec Empire, and even combined Cortés and Alvarado into one person, Cortés. Wtf?

  • Kushnuma

    I thought this tale had a lot of tragedy involved. I also liked Itacate's and Francisco's love story, although it wasn't easy for them as both had different views/ religion and grew up differently.

    And when Itacate thinks that he died (I also thought that!), I was heart-broken. But it turned out well for them in the end, so all was well.

  • Hannah

    I read this book for school (gr. 8) for my History/S.S. class. There were some parts of the book... umm the romance... which made it a bit weird reading it aloud to classmates and having a teacher reading it to us.

    Overall it was a pretty meh book. It was pretty historically accurate, and when it wasn’t, it wasn’t a big deal. Well, at least for me personally since I’m not a history buff, these types of things don’t bother me. It just wasn’t memorable, I guess. I don’t think I’ll think much about

    I read this book for school (gr. 8) for my History/S.S. class. There were some parts of the book... umm the romance... which made it a bit weird reading it aloud to classmates and having a teacher reading it to us.

    Overall it was a pretty meh book. It was pretty historically accurate, and when it wasn’t, it wasn’t a big deal. Well, at least for me personally since I’m not a history buff, these types of things don’t bother me. It just wasn’t memorable, I guess. I don’t think I’ll think much about it anytime soon. I definitely wouldn’t have picked up a book like this if it wasn’t for a class, and now that I’ve read it, I’m not particularly compelled to. It wasn’t a bad book by any means, just eh.

  • Book Concierge

    2.5**

    A novel set in the 15th century city of Tenochtitlan, the capital of the Aztec empire ruled by Montezuma. Fifteen-year-old Itacate has lived under a cloud of darkness since she was born and the priests predicted she would bring ruin to her family. Her mother died in childbirth, but her father has cared for her and her twin brother Mitotiqui. As they leave childhood behind their paths diverge – Mitotiqui begins formal schooling, while Itacate, like other girls her age, begins to learn house

    2.5**

    A novel set in the 15th century city of Tenochtitlan, the capital of the Aztec empire ruled by Montezuma. Fifteen-year-old Itacate has lived under a cloud of darkness since she was born and the priests predicted she would bring ruin to her family. Her mother died in childbirth, but her father has cared for her and her twin brother Mitotiqui. As they leave childhood behind their paths diverge – Mitotiqui begins formal schooling, while Itacate, like other girls her age, begins to learn household skills such as cooking, cleaning and weaving. But when her father discovers Itacate’s natural talent for designing and crafting fine jewelry he defies convention to make her his apprentice (though only in secret).

    I had such high hopes for this story. I definitely enjoyed the information on the culture and society that was the Aztec empire. I liked how Landman revealed the differences in the religious beliefs of the Spanish conquistadors and the Aztec people. I wasn’t particularly bothered by the historical inaccuracies (Landman explains in a note at the end that she combined elements of histories of Peru and the Caribbean to make the story work). I thought the “Romeo & Juliet” side story was unnecessary and predictable, but appropriate for the target audience. In total, it was a quick read and held my interest. So why only 2.5 stars?

    I was sorely disappointed with the constant message that all the bad things that happened were the fault of Itacate and her defiance of the restrictions placed on women of that society. Really? Cortez invaded the city because she began to apprentice to her father? Yes, she eventually comes to the conclusion that this is poppycock, but the repeated message before that realization really made my teeth hurt. I certainly wouldn’t want my daughter or son reading (and absorbing) this kind of message.

  • Krystle

    You know for a book that takes place during the Aztec period, you’d think this would be some awesomeness, right? Hah, wrong! I can’t believe how boring this thing was!

    I mean, for such a short book, it took me ages to finish this thing. Mostly because I wasn’t attached to any of the characters and the plot was really uneventful. The girl was sort of a selfish brat and I don’t know, it just lacked tension. The romance was super rushed. How do you fall in love just by seeing someone for like two se

    You know for a book that takes place during the Aztec period, you’d think this would be some awesomeness, right? Hah, wrong! I can’t believe how boring this thing was!

    I mean, for such a short book, it took me ages to finish this thing. Mostly because I wasn’t attached to any of the characters and the plot was really uneventful. The girl was sort of a selfish brat and I don’t know, it just lacked tension. The romance was super rushed. How do you fall in love just by seeing someone for like two seconds? Huh? Way weird!

    The only parts I mildly liked were when Itacate and her father were building the statues and molding all the gold. I thought it was really neat. And I was thinking that maybe the author had did a good job of researching the time period because her world building seemed developed and the Spanish invasion was compelling.

    But then I found out she made up practically everything. Way to let down your readers.

    I am not pleased.

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