Real Cajun: Rustic Home Cooking from Donald Link's Louisiana

Real Cajun: Rustic Home Cooking from Donald Link's Louisiana

An untamed region teeming with snakes, alligators, and snapping turtles, with sausage and cracklins sold at every gas station, Cajun Country is a world unto itself. The heart of this area—the Acadiana region of Louisiana—is a tough land that funnels its spirit into the local cuisine. You can’t find more delicious, rustic, and satisfying country cooking than the dirty rice,...

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Title:Real Cajun: Rustic Home Cooking from Donald Link's Louisiana
Author:Donald Link
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Real Cajun: Rustic Home Cooking from Donald Link's Louisiana Reviews

  • Amy

    When I read Frank Bruni's

    of

    , one of Donald Link's New Orleans restaurants, I actually started salivating. When I visited later in the year, it did not disappoint. Neither does

    , which features a few of Cochon's recipes, as well as some from

    , and some from Link's family, friends, and local favorites. Despite New Orleans' reputation for excess (and Link's obvious appreciation for fried oysters, fried chicken livers, fried chicken, and pork belly cracklins),

    When I read Frank Bruni's

    of

    , one of Donald Link's New Orleans restaurants, I actually started salivating. When I visited later in the year, it did not disappoint. Neither does

    , which features a few of Cochon's recipes, as well as some from

    , and some from Link's family, friends, and local favorites. Despite New Orleans' reputation for excess (and Link's obvious appreciation for fried oysters, fried chicken livers, fried chicken, and pork belly cracklins), not every recipe in this cookbook is unrealistic for everyday eating. The German Festival Ham and White Bean Stew is delicious and healthy, as is the Vietnamese Marinated Shrimp and the Summer Crab and Tomato Salad. And I couldn't help but like Donald Link himself, whose personality is very present in the book, as is his love for food and for Louisiana.

    Between the two of us, my wife and I have one culinary degree and a great deal of cooking experience, so we rarely cook from cookbooks and don't buy them much anymore. But I can't seem to let this one go back to the library without promising to get a copy of my own.

  • Marion Pilger

    Great recipes. Amazing photography. I felt it was liking reading a family history book with lots of background information about the recipes and the ingredients and the people. Although not listed as an ingredient in any recipe in this cookbook - it seemed to me that there was a large spoonful of love stirred into every dish.

  • David Reber

    James Beard Award winning chef, paddling his pirogue right out of the Atchafalya Basin, shares his family's recipes from the bayou. Great stories from where these recipes came and I can't wait to get in my outside kitchen and get into his boudin bourre chicken thighs, crawfish etoufee, and dirty rice.

    I'll let y'all know when me, Marie, and Boudreaux pass a good time and get to cookin' and we'll plan a fais do do. We'll satisfy the envie and catch up on ya momma an' them. We'll even get you a li

    James Beard Award winning chef, paddling his pirogue right out of the Atchafalya Basin, shares his family's recipes from the bayou. Great stories from where these recipes came and I can't wait to get in my outside kitchen and get into his boudin bourre chicken thighs, crawfish etoufee, and dirty rice.

    I'll let y'all know when me, Marie, and Boudreaux pass a good time and get to cookin' and we'll plan a fais do do. We'll satisfy the envie and catch up on ya momma an' them. We'll even get you a little lagniappe at The Flying Pigs Lounge and celebrate joie de vivre.

    Laissez les bon temps rouler! Aaiiee!

  • Elizabeth

    I bought this book at the eatery "Butcher" in New Orleans, after having the best shrimp and grits in my life.

    Note: The recipes are pretty fattening--but delicious.

  • Anne

    This cookbook was a Christmas gift last year, and while I haven't finished it, I've made several recipes, all of which were delicious, and read most of the rest, which explains my drooling problem. Donald Link’s style is as engaging as the photography: his accounts of family crawfish boils and church suppers give a homestyle context to impeccably-shot, super-tasty food. This is the food he grew up eating, and while I think ease of preparation in a home kitchen will depend on how much time &

    This cookbook was a Christmas gift last year, and while I haven't finished it, I've made several recipes, all of which were delicious, and read most of the rest, which explains my drooling problem. Donald Link’s style is as engaging as the photography: his accounts of family crawfish boils and church suppers give a homestyle context to impeccably-shot, super-tasty food. This is the food he grew up eating, and while I think ease of preparation in a home kitchen will depend on how much time & space you’ve got, you’d be nuts to skip this book.

    is a winner in my book, but the top of the heap guilty fave the hubs and I really like are the

    . Like many of the recipes herein, prep time is significant, and payoff is spectacular. Salty, spicy, delectable and fried, these (apparently non-authentic, judging by the online complaints about beef vs pork and veal) meat pies are wonderful with a nice cold beer. My own preference here would be for New Belgium’s summer seasonal “Skinny Dip,” but I imagine any good light ale would do. Link is right: you can’t eat as many as you think you can, but they freeze well. Somewhere between hors-d'oeuvre and meal, they would make good party fare. I heed Alton Brown's warnings against single-purpose appliances, and my kitchen is fairly wee, but there's a part of me that is tempted towards a Fry-Daddy every time I glance over this recipe.

    Slight complaint: Link completely ripped off the atrociously-named “Chocolate Yummy” from my grandmother, but I’ll forgive him for the sake of the toasted pecan crust. That's an update, sorry Grandma.

    Fortunately for my waistband, seafood is expensive and time is short these days, or I'd be making far more of these recipes far more often.

  • Maren

    I've been wanting to eat Cajun food again ever since I spent a week in Lafayette in spring of last year. Where I live now, there's no way I'm going to get Cajun food unless I make it myself. I've especially been craving some nice jambalaya--and was so grateful and excited to find a recipe for it in this book! I think Link's recipe could feel daunting, since step 1 is to roast a chicken and step 2 is to make stock with the carcass, but I just happened to have already done both those things and sa

    I've been wanting to eat Cajun food again ever since I spent a week in Lafayette in spring of last year. Where I live now, there's no way I'm going to get Cajun food unless I make it myself. I've especially been craving some nice jambalaya--and was so grateful and excited to find a recipe for it in this book! I think Link's recipe could feel daunting, since step 1 is to roast a chicken and step 2 is to make stock with the carcass, but I just happened to have already done both those things and sailed off to jambalaya-land this morning. I liked the results and I'm looking forward to trying more of his recipes. If those also go well I might feel qualified to come back and give another star.

  • Melissa

    This cookbook provides an interesting description of Cajun culture and food. Although the recipes I tried worked well, I found them too rich for my personal health choices. In several cases, the author takes the traditional recipe and makes it even more fattening by adding lots of cream. However, I will use a couple of the dessert recipes for special occasions.

  • Mia

    Recipes sounded and looked good, but overall most of them needed tweaking to just be edible. Too much work! When I buy a recipe book I just want to cook the recipes as is (or at least w/ minimal tweaking) and not stand there and think, "How can I save this?"

    So, instructions were clear and the photos were nice, but the recipes were far from delicious. So disappointing! I was really craving some New Orleans cuisine.

  • Catherine Woodman

    I think this is the best cookbook for the genre that I have seen--it came out this year with fellow New Orleans chef Jeff Besh's cookbook--they were both nominated as best American cookbook for both the IACP and the James Beard award--one won one, the other the other, so maybe it is just as good--We have made the dinner rolls, the biscuits, the jambalaya and the shrimp creole and they have all been spectacular--so it is more like Cochon food than Herbsaint--but very good and I would highly recom

    I think this is the best cookbook for the genre that I have seen--it came out this year with fellow New Orleans chef Jeff Besh's cookbook--they were both nominated as best American cookbook for both the IACP and the James Beard award--one won one, the other the other, so maybe it is just as good--We have made the dinner rolls, the biscuits, the jambalaya and the shrimp creole and they have all been spectacular--so it is more like Cochon food than Herbsaint--but very good and I would highly recommend it if you come home from the Crescent City and want to recreate some of the food.. This cookbook makes it possible to do that .

  • Rea K

    The gumbo recipe would probably be better if I could cook the roux properly. The crawfish etouffe is not bad (not a seafood fan) and I made it for my Meats, Fish, and Poultry class instead of the one in the book.

    The broccoli and rice thing with homemade mushroom soup is good. Of course, the mushroom sherry soup from school kicks ass compared to this stuff, but not bad. And I don't like mushrooms.

    That's all I remember cooking out of this.

    I love the pictures, the stories, everything. Dude, I lo

    The gumbo recipe would probably be better if I could cook the roux properly. The crawfish etouffe is not bad (not a seafood fan) and I made it for my Meats, Fish, and Poultry class instead of the one in the book.

    The broccoli and rice thing with homemade mushroom soup is good. Of course, the mushroom sherry soup from school kicks ass compared to this stuff, but not bad. And I don't like mushrooms.

    That's all I remember cooking out of this.

    I love the pictures, the stories, everything. Dude, I love cookbooks. One of my favorites to page through. I want to save it when the library removes it from circulation so I can have it all for my own.

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