Agile Coaching

Agile Coaching

Discover how to coach your team to become more Agile. Agile Coaching de-mystifies agile practices--it's a practical guide to creating strong agile teams. Packed with useful tips from practicing agile coaches Rachel Davies and Liz Sedley, this book gives you coaching tools that you can apply whether you are a project manager, a technical lead, or working in a software team....

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Title:Agile Coaching
Author:Rachel Davies
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Edition Language:English

Agile Coaching Reviews

  • Nicolas Leroy

    This book packs a lot of knowledge. I recognised stuff I’m already practicing myself, and also found new interesting things to try out. As other reviewers said, I’ll probably try to re-read it every year in order to pick up new things, find things I overlooked this time or something that can help in the situation I am at that moment. Thanks for bundling so much information in one book.

  • Hayri

    This is a well-organized book related to Agile Coaching not only for Agile Coaches; but also for the people who want to be a part of a result-oriented, creative and productive team at work.

    The best thing about the book is, the theory is given with real-life examples. The topics are not so long and easy to understand. In "Hurdles" section of each Chapter, the possible difficulties that we can come across are explained. All chapters include a "Checklist" section in which the topic is s

    This is a well-organized book related to Agile Coaching not only for Agile Coaches; but also for the people who want to be a part of a result-oriented, creative and productive team at work.

    The best thing about the book is, the theory is given with real-life examples. The topics are not so long and easy to understand. In "Hurdles" section of each Chapter, the possible difficulties that we can come across are explained. All chapters include a "Checklist" section in which the topic is summarized well. I think this book can be used as a reference book. Time to time, we can have a look at "Checklist" and "Hurdles" sections.

  • Buddy2Blogger

    Excellent book for people beginning their career as an Agile Coach.

  • Pieter Kuijpers

    I read this book when I started on a new project as team lead for one of my clients. The client is in the process of adopting agile but the team was very inexperienced with agile practices. Having worked in agile teams at other clients, the task of coaching the team to be more agile fell upon me.

    As such, I feel I'm the ideal audience for this book. The authors assume basic knowledge of agile practices and focus on techniques to help a team apply them better. It's very practical, more a collecti

    I read this book when I started on a new project as team lead for one of my clients. The client is in the process of adopting agile but the team was very inexperienced with agile practices. Having worked in agile teams at other clients, the task of coaching the team to be more agile fell upon me.

    As such, I feel I'm the ideal audience for this book. The authors assume basic knowledge of agile practices and focus on techniques to help a team apply them better. It's very practical, more a collection of tips from the trenches than a theoretical treatise. I found many of the tips to be immediately usable in my situation. Don't expect any life-changing eye-openers though, most of the tips are pretty basic, like the importance of having an iteration demo (and the required preparation) and retrospective.

    The book is pleasant to read. The main text is interspersed with examples and stories from a typical project, which make it light reading.

    All in all a very practical and readable book for the agile practitioner that aspires to do more or better coaching of teammates. For experienced agile coaches or scrum masters there may be too little new information in it, but I liked it.

  • Koen Wellens

    Let me just start with saying I regret not finishing this sooner. I wish this post was about a re-read rather than a first read. Because there is so much good advice in this book. It’s a collection of useful information for anyone interested in agile coaching.

    There are many things in this book that are not new for me. Yet it is good to see them written down. What I thought was great is how the authors added personal stories to help point out certain practices. A lesser thing were the

    Let me just start with saying I regret not finishing this sooner. I wish this post was about a re-read rather than a first read. Because there is so much good advice in this book. It’s a collection of useful information for anyone interested in agile coaching.

    There are many things in this book that are not new for me. Yet it is good to see them written down. What I thought was great is how the authors added personal stories to help point out certain practices. A lesser thing were the grey boxes. They were at almost every page and sometimes split the story. I started to feel bad about those.

    Read the full review at

    .

  • Nathalie Karasek

    A couple of interesting thoughts, tips, hints and (most important) examples :)

  • Mohamed Abdelwahab

    More information about Agile Development , How to become Agile coach , How to use Agile tools, How to use test driven development, How to Building an agile team,How to invest in team, How to growing you, and More fantastic and important things to produce a great product.

  • Jean Tessier

    I was an agile coach at Google for 18 months, starting in 2008. I figured I should check out this book and compare notes.

    The book is directed specifically at agile coaches: people whose role it is to turn development teams to agile methodologies. The authors are trying to mentor the mostly junior coaches in how to deal with their team. There are three layers of experience: teams have limited knowledge of agile, coaches know agile principles and are passionate about them, but lack ski

    I was an agile coach at Google for 18 months, starting in 2008. I figured I should check out this book and compare notes.

    The book is directed specifically at agile coaches: people whose role it is to turn development teams to agile methodologies. The authors are trying to mentor the mostly junior coaches in how to deal with their team. There are three layers of experience: teams have limited knowledge of agile, coaches know agile principles and are passionate about them, but lack skills to transfer their knowledge and enthusiasm to their team, and the authors who have it all.

    The authors cover many situations that can occur with teams new to agile and some of the ways to get them past obstacles. In doing so, they often drop into

    vs.

    language. This emphasizes the adversarial aspect of the relationship between team and coach and makes the job of the coach that much harder. Teams can emit enough negative energy on their own without muddying the channel further. Coaches really need to cultivate their sense of being part of their team, not apart from it. Even if the assignment is temporary, for its duration their fate is tied to that of the team.

    There is a lot of material for junior coaches dealing with novice teams. One thing that I found missing was more advanced material. Agile books in general are good at bootstrapping a self-adjusting team, saying that over time they will find individually optimal processes. But what are the stumbling blocks of intermediate or advanced teams? What are some other techniques that more experienced coaches use? The basic stuff is great, but more original material would have been even better.

    The book uses an interesting device. Most of the book is written in the joined voices of both authors. But every once in a while, one author relates a personal anecdote or opinion. So the text breaks off and the lone author is either offset from the margin or put in a sidebar. So it's always clear who's talking.

    The last chapter about self-learning opportunities for coaches was excellent.

    Here are some selected useful bits of advice that stuck with me.

    During stand up meeting, make sure each team member is reporting to the team and not to one individual in particular. This is not a status reporting meeting but an opportunity for the team members to coordinate their day's work. At Insidr, we have the scrum master take notes during the meeting and it can very easily devolve into each member reporting status to the scrum master, each in turn, while nobody else pays attention. This is the opposite of what the stand up meeting is meant to be.

    Have the stand up meeting at the task board, or bring the task board to the stand up meeting. The meeting is more meaningful if the tasks being discussed are right in front of everybody.

    Approach reading a book like building a jigsaw puzzle: peruse all the pieces, find the edges, work out the easy parts of the interior, and keep the most difficult pieces for last. When dealing with a book, scan all the headings and illustrations to get the overall message, then read the parts that provide the overall structure, skipping hard passages to focus on breadth over depth, then coming back to parts of interest.

  • Pdmoore

    It's obvious to compare this one to Adkins Coaching Agile Teams. This book is more appropriate to someone newer to agile and doesn't dig as deep into the coach role as Adkins. While I got a couple of new ideas from it, for me there was a lot of rehash. I would recommend this to someone starting off in the Scrum Master role (is there a good book for those folks?).

  • Martin

    um, not really new insights (for me). If you're new to agile it may be worth reading. I needed to force me to continue reading it and step over to the next chapter.

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