The Haunter of the Dark

The Haunter of the Dark

WARNING! YOU ARE ABOUT TO ENTER A NEW DIMENSION OF UTMOST TERRORWhen you open this book you will lost - lost in a world of dreadful nightmare brought to screaming life by the century's greatest master of adult fantasy and horror.H.P. LovecraftHere is a collection of the most famous stories of this master of tomb-dark fear:The Rats In The Walls, The Call Of Cthulh/>The/>H.P....

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Title:The Haunter of the Dark
Author:H.P. Lovecraft
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Edition Language:English

The Haunter of the Dark Reviews

  • Tania Donald

    If I had to choose only one author to read for the rest of my life, I think I would choose H P Lovecraft and be perfectly happy.

    It took me a couple of attempts to get into Lovecraft initially, with his long sentences and slightly archaic prose style. Once bitten though, you are a Lovecraft addict for life - at least I am. What is so enthrallingly wonderful about Lovecraft, apart from his astonishing imagination, huge vocabulary, and his devotion to the antique, to the past, and the rich history

    If I had to choose only one author to read for the rest of my life, I think I would choose H P Lovecraft and be perfectly happy.

    It took me a couple of attempts to get into Lovecraft initially, with his long sentences and slightly archaic prose style. Once bitten though, you are a Lovecraft addict for life - at least I am. What is so enthrallingly wonderful about Lovecraft, apart from his astonishing imagination, huge vocabulary, and his devotion to the antique, to the past, and the rich history of Rhose Island and New England, is that together his stories evoke a cohesive world. It is a world filled with the darkest shadows, unnameable horrors, forbidden knowledge, and edritch revelations which send men insane. It is a world haunted by the Elder Gods, those shadowy, alien, ill-intentioned beings who are always lurking just beyond the corner of your eye, or in the darkest depths of the sea. It is a world of thrilling fear and terrible wonder. It is a world that will draw you back, again and again, to share the secrets of Lovecraft's haunted outsiders.

    For my money there is no greater author of supernatural fiction than Lovecraft, and the fictional world he creates, Arkham, is one of the most mysterious and thrilling literary creations I have encountered.

    Favourite stories include "The Colour Out Of Space," "The Strange, High House In The Mist," "The Case of Charles Dexter Ward," and of course, "The Call of Cthulhu."

  • Graham

    The final instalment of the three Lovecraft Omnibuses, this collects together his mid-length work. I think it's my favourite of the three books, mainly because there are so many good stories here. In fact, there are only three I didn't enjoy as much as I'd hoped: THE MUSIC OF ERICH ZANN is a little cliched, THE PICTURE IN THE HOUSE is middling, and THE SHADOW OUT OF TIME is downright dull.

    The rest is excellence. THE OUTSIDER is an alien fantasy written in a fine grandiose style. THE

    The final instalment of the three Lovecraft Omnibuses, this collects together his mid-length work. I think it's my favourite of the three books, mainly because there are so many good stories here. In fact, there are only three I didn't enjoy as much as I'd hoped: THE MUSIC OF ERICH ZANN is a little cliched, THE PICTURE IN THE HOUSE is middling, and THE SHADOW OUT OF TIME is downright dull.

    The rest is excellence. THE OUTSIDER is an alien fantasy written in a fine grandiose style. THE RATS IN THE WALLS is completely disturbing and easily the strongest of the author's early works. It has it all: monsters, magic, cannibalism, and of course the ancient gods.

    PICKMAN'S MODEL is a little obvious, but nonetheless brimming with atmosphere. Meanwhile, THE CALL OF CTHULHU is, in my mind, the definitive mythos story, a global epic that inspired countless imitations (Brian Lumley seems to have been particularly inspired by it) but few equals. THE DUNWICH HORROR, a period horror set in a small town, is more traditional but no less enjoyable for it.

    THE WHISPERER IN DARKNESS sees the same plot elements being recycled one more time, but it still works somehow. THE COLOUR OUT OF SPACE, with its tale of a sinister meteorite falling from the skies, is another personal favourite, everything I love about the author contained in one single story. THE HAUNTER OF THE DARK is almost a pastiche and written in homage to Robert Bloch, an eventful and engaging little outing.

    THE THING ON THE DOORSTOP builds from a slow start to a gruesome, Grand Guignol climax and has one of my favourite opening sentences in a story. THE LURKING FEAR features loathsome fungoid horrors so can't really go wrong, and THE SHADOW OVER INNSMOUTH is so well known as to need no description; needless to say, it's a classic for a reason.

    Everything great about Lovecraft is collected in this volume, and I think you'd be hard pressed to find a better assortment of writing in one place. It's the stuff of greatness!

  • Anton

    I can't say enough about Haunter of the Dark. If you like paranormal horror, told in super descriptive prose, and richly laden with adjectives, then don't pass up on this one. It will surely give you nightmares. The story is about a man named Blake, who decides to break into an abandoned Church, despite the numerous warnings from his neighbors not to enter. When Blake enters the Church, he encounters artifacts and books left behind by an Satantic cult which have a peculiar effect on him upon rea

    I can't say enough about Haunter of the Dark. If you like paranormal horror, told in super descriptive prose, and richly laden with adjectives, then don't pass up on this one. It will surely give you nightmares. The story is about a man named Blake, who decides to break into an abandoned Church, despite the numerous warnings from his neighbors not to enter. When Blake enters the Church, he encounters artifacts and books left behind by an Satantic cult which have a peculiar effect on him upon reading and inspecting them. Before he knows it, he's being stalked by a dark beings out of space and time...and it eventually leads to everything from severe weather--and Blake's own doom.

  • Zehavit

    Contains his best works. Over the top language with CYCLOPEAN, DEMONIAC and ALIENAGE championing the vocabulary. I can't explain why I love these tales so much but I do enough to revisit every year or so.

  • Katie

    I’m going back through Lovecraft to get down to writing some reviews, and it is incredible to return to these stories and realise how much they have influenced my own writing and my own interests and what I like to read and watch... Every single paragraph in this one had me going “wow”. I knew that this was one of my favourite Lovecraft short stories and now I really remember why.

    This is classic Lovecraft, and it is pleasant to say that as there is not the usual icky Lovecraft racism in this (a

    I’m going back through Lovecraft to get down to writing some reviews, and it is incredible to return to these stories and realise how much they have influenced my own writing and my own interests and what I like to read and watch... Every single paragraph in this one had me going “wow”. I knew that this was one of my favourite Lovecraft short stories and now I really remember why.

    This is classic Lovecraft, and it is pleasant to say that as there is not the usual icky Lovecraft racism in this (at least not obviously). The style of writing and the language of this story make my heart sing. The archaisms of it really suit the narrative, something so old and arcane. No one can string together long, bizarre sentences like Lovecraft can:

    ‘And beyond all else he glimpsed an infinite gulf of darkness, where solid and semi-solid forms were known only by their windy stirrings, and cloudy patterns of force seemed to superimpose order on chaos and hold forth a key to all the paradoxes and arcana of the worlds we know.’

    The mind-bending strange fiction really comes across in this story, and the sections with the hints of the ancient rituals in the tower and the appearance of the Haunter were my favourites. The lack of description about what the Haunter truly is, and the way we really only see what it leaves behind and the effect it has on people, is brilliant. That is a pretty standard trope in horror fiction, but Lovecraft always hits it to the extreme and I can’t get enough of that. What I also love is that is told through the eyes of a narrator trying to collate the victim, Robert Blake’s, papers so the true facts of the case are still hidden, and only the hints of what has really happened come through.

    At the same time, amongst all the weirdness, there is something so traditionally Gothic about this story – the abandoned church with its shadowy tower and the superstitious village-folk shunning it. All of that is raised to such a cosmic intensity and it is so enthralling and under-the-skin creepy. The reader is forced along through Blake’s unhinged journey until that fantastic climax with the lights going out across the town.

    It is one of my favourite Lovecraft stories – for its deep and dark atmosphere, its hints towards the unknowable and the forbidden, its gorgeously eerie descriptions of the village and the architecture of the church, and the perils of coming face-to-face with the vastness of the universe. That is why I love Lovecraft’s fiction – it acknowledges how alien the cosmos is and how tiny we are in comparison to everything out there. And that is where the true horror, and fascination, of it lies!

    The quote from Lovecraft in ST Joshi’s intro really sums it up so well:

    ‘To achieve the essence of real externality, whether of time or space or dimension, one must forget that such things as organic life, good and evil, love and hate, and all such local attributes of a negligible and temporary race called mankind, have any existence at all. Only the human scenes and characters must have human qualities. These must be handled with unsparing realism (not catch-penny romanticism) but when we cross the line to the boundless and hideous unknown – the shadow-haunted Outside – we must remember to leave our humanity and terrestrialism at the threshold.’

  • Juho Pohjalainen

    I adore H.P. Lovecraft's work, and I have read most things he's written in his life. His style of writing is long-winded and full of purple prose, a little difficult to get into, but intensely rewarding should you manage to hold on to it. And this story is, in my personal opinion, the very best of the lot.

    The Haunter of the Dark is the last completed story Lovecraft wrote, and nothing less than the purest distillation of everything we nowadays know him of. Almost as if some dark gulf

    I adore H.P. Lovecraft's work, and I have read most things he's written in his life. His style of writing is long-winded and full of purple prose, a little difficult to get into, but intensely rewarding should you manage to hold on to it. And this story is, in my personal opinion, the very best of the lot.

    The Haunter of the Dark is the last completed story Lovecraft wrote, and nothing less than the purest distillation of everything we nowadays know him of. Almost as if some dark gulfs beyond the stars had forewarned him of his imminent demise, and before his passing he intended to leave one final and complete account of his mortal life here on earth. I wouldn't know what the truth is, but it's also all too easy to believe in such.

    Robert Blake's dark quest brings the reader amazingly detailed descriptions of old town architecture, ancient churches with dark history, superstitious locals, investigation and detective work, sinister cults, creepy ancient books, aliens from beyond the stars, history lessons from times long before mankind, an ancient artifact that's changed hands many times and caused doom and chaos in its wake, unsettling and possibly supernatural nightmares, harrowing diary entries right before death, lightning storms, darkness, and of course, a Great Old One that mankind can't understand but that is undoubtedly sinister. Barring perhaps vast ruins of some pre-human civilization, and of course seafood, everything can be found in this single story.

    If you're looking to find out exactly what Lovecraft was all about, in less than twenty pages, it's right here.

  • Robert

    Lovecraft’s prose, with his lingering use of adjectives, is quite evocative and has a very pleasing ‘pulp’ style. This collection contains most of his best stories, namely: ‘The Call of Cthulu’, ‘The Dunwich Horror’, ‘The Whisperer in Darkness’, ‘The Colour Out of Space’, ‘The Thing on the Doorstep’, ‘The Lurking Fear’, ‘The Shadow Over Innsmouth’ and ‘The Shadow Out of Time’. If you’ve never read any of Lovecraft’s work, these stories are a good place to start.

  • Kostas

    7/10

    After reading a few of

    's stories, which were part of the Cthulhu mythos, I had but to read the author who created it all: the one and only H.P. Lovecraft!

    This volume includes:

    The/>*Review

    7/10

    After reading a few of

    's stories, which were part of the Cthulhu mythos, I had but to read the author who created it all: the one and only H.P. Lovecraft!

    This volume includes:

    It is, really, the first time I’m reading anything from Lovecraft but I must say that this book, even though it is the third -and largest- volume from the collection Wordsworth releashed, it left me, somewhat, with some very mixed feelings.

    I wouldn't say that the stories were bad, or entirely boring, but just that this volume focuses mostly on Lovecraft’s "Dream Cycle" stories which, personally, most of them didn’t really impress me as much as I would have wanted.

    However, it is definitely a collection that is worth reading, even if it is only for Lovecraft's, truly, wonderful ideas - which, in the end, is all that matters.

    My favorite picks from this collection are :

    ,

    ,

    ,

    and of course the story of the title, "

    .

  • connie

    In the beginning it was hard to read as Lovecraft can be a bit wordy in his descriptions ,but after getting over that,I was amazed at such a mind that could come up with these stories. It is as if he crawled inside the thoughts of every terrified person and recorded what he saw there.That is how intense and maddening it is . Not your usual horror story ,with monsters that are easy to identify,but ones that make you think and try to imagine in your mind just what the main character sees. I recomm

    In the beginning it was hard to read as Lovecraft can be a bit wordy in his descriptions ,but after getting over that,I was amazed at such a mind that could come up with these stories. It is as if he crawled inside the thoughts of every terrified person and recorded what he saw there.That is how intense and maddening it is . Not your usual horror story ,with monsters that are easy to identify,but ones that make you think and try to imagine in your mind just what the main character sees. I recommend it for those who want a true glimpse of the kind of horror story that gave birth to such writers as King for instance.

  • Joey Woolfardis

    No love for short stories have I. I never have liked them and I'm not sure I ever will, but Lovecraft seems to have them nailed to a T and I can't fault him.

    Everything Lovecraftian exists in this story: Diary entries from someone very interested in folklore and the occult; strange, unavoidable pulls towards odd locations or items, excitable over-active imaginations that are all too obsessed with The Other, and countless others besides.

    I personally think-and find that this

    No love for short stories have I. I never have liked them and I'm not sure I ever will, but Lovecraft seems to have them nailed to a T and I can't fault him.

    Everything Lovecraftian exists in this story: Diary entries from someone very interested in folklore and the occult; strange, unavoidable pulls towards odd locations or items, excitable over-active imaginations that are all too obsessed with The Other, and countless others besides.

    I personally think-and find that this accounts for my recently acquired fondness for Lovecraft-that his writing would never suite a novel-length piece of writing (she says not knowing if he did ever write a novel or not because she's too lazy to look it up). If he ever did, I hope I won't be disappointed but think I probably will be. The sheer wonder of what the imagination can come up with is spread thickly through this story, where we follow a man named Blake as he explores an old, rundown church in the Italian Quarter of a town.

    It explores imagination beyond the ideal and finds that the mind can make of nothing absolutely everything. It is almost metaphorical, deep down, yet lathers up the occult and eldritch goings on to such a mass that the metaphorical becomes the absurd and the truth is then the unthinkable.

    One thing I think contributes to the success of Lovecraft and his inimitable style is that Americans think 150 years counts as history. The idea of folklore being as recent as 50 years is quite ridiculous, and yet it works so well. These stories need that near distant memory, of someone knowing someone who's grandad saw something creepy happening. Or a father remembering something from his childhood but through the fog of life can't quite recall it clearly. Every little thing seems to rely on this recent folklore to create the intrigue and wonder that makes Lovecraft so bloody good. I think thinking 150 years as being a decent history is pathetic, but in the interest of these stories and the enjoyment of them, it works superbly well.

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