No One Here Gets Out Alive

No One Here Gets Out Alive

Here is Jim Morrison in all his complexity-singer, philosopher, poet, delinquent-the brilliant, charismatic, and obsessed seeker who rejected authority in any form, the explorer who probed "the bounds of reality to see what would happen..." Seven years in the writing, this definitive biography is the work of two men whose empathy and experience with Jim Morrison uniquely p...

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Title:No One Here Gets Out Alive
Author:Danny Sugerman
Rating:
Edition Language:English

No One Here Gets Out Alive Reviews

  • Metáfora

    Is everybody in? Is everybody in? Is everybody in? The ceremony is about to begin...

  • Cwn_annwn_13

    To say that many of his fans are morons that get grandiose and delusional about him is an understatement. However I still find that The Doors music stands the test of time and think Morrison was a talented and interesting guy. This book, while good, could have been a lot better. The authors, one of whom knew Morrison personally, interviewed multiple people that were close to him and The Doors, but yet its hard get a true feel for what sort of person Morrison was underneath the front that he put

    To say that many of his fans are morons that get grandiose and delusional about him is an understatement. However I still find that The Doors music stands the test of time and think Morrison was a talented and interesting guy. This book, while good, could have been a lot better. The authors, one of whom knew Morrison personally, interviewed multiple people that were close to him and The Doors, but yet its hard get a true feel for what sort of person Morrison was underneath the front that he put up. Maybe this can't fully be blamed on the authors because I believe Morrison put up a wall/image at a very young age and rarely if ever ventured on the other side of it. One thing I liked about Morrisson is he seemed to have more of an interest in literature and poetry that music, and his long term aspirations were in that direction.

    Overall this book is interesting/entertaining. A good portion of it is recounting of Morrisons self destructive drunken antics. The faults are it didn't get on the other side of the mask that Morrison wore, the authors were obviously overly enthusiastic fans. I also find this books habit of quoting/enacting conversations greatly annoying. I realize they interviewed people that were involved in them but how sure can we be of the accuracy of word for word quotations of words that were exchanged 30 years before this book was published.

  • Jason Koivu

    In the age of flower power, the Summer of Love and an era in which a generation sought peace not war, The Doors came out of the darker corners of man's desire.

    Harbingers of evil? No. This is about the conduits of humanity in all its beauty and horror.

    The Doors embodied yin and yang...

    In

    , Danny Sugarman has put together the comprehensive legend of Jim Morrison's life, as well as the birth

    In the age of flower power, the Summer of Love and an era in which a generation sought peace not war, The Doors came out of the darker corners of man's desire.

    Harbingers of evil? No. This is about the conduits of humanity in all its beauty and horror.

    The Doors embodied yin and yang...

    In

    , Danny Sugarman has put together the comprehensive legend of Jim Morrison's life, as well as the birth and death of the band that made Morrison godlike in the eyes of millions.

    While keyboardist Ray Manzarek, guitarist Robby Krieger and drummer John Densmore were adept musicians, they were a mere back-up band for the wildly enigmatic, charismatic Morrison. Sugarman treats them with deference, but they are relegated to the background here too. The author knows what his readers have come for and he gives it to them.

    The phoenix rises and bursts into flame with the blazing sun of the southern Californian, mercurial late '60s music scene as the backdrop.

    "sex, drugs and rock'n'roll" and as a teenager reading this, I LOVED it. So why only 3 stars?

    The problem is it's rather sycophantic and not well-written. How could you expect anything more? Danny Sugarman was perhaps the most diehard Doors fan of all time. At the age of 12 he started working for the band answering fan mail. Before he was even out of high school he was managing them. After they dissolved, Sugarman managed Ray Manzarek's solo work. How could this book not be partisan? After all, there's a reason armies are made up of 18-year-olds.

    All the negatives aside, this was the Bible to the kid version of me, who was a hardcore Morrison fanatic (he and I share the same birthday, which I thought at the time meant I could pretty much see into his soul...ahhh teenagers), but

    is not a biography about Jesus. It's just about a fucked up kid who landed in a band of fairly accomplished musicians who were willing to put his bad poetry to music, creating songs that found a disenfranchised audience at just the right time. Interesting story about an interesting individual. Really, that's it, even if it means so very much more to many.

    If you're a Doors fan, this is essential reading. You've discovered the right place to geek out. If you're a fan of late 60s music, especially the L.A. scene, you'll find plenty to sink your teeth into. If you're everyone else? Then this is not

    the book you're looking for.

    Frankly, this could be given any rating,

  • Bill

    I am a long-time Doors fan. I own all their music and still include it in my music rotation - nearly 40 years after my first exposure to them. Morrison was a very bright man cursed with uncommonly good looks and a ferocious thirst for large quantities of whiskey. The latter led him to an early grave. This book colorfully accounts for his genius and outrageous appetites that led to his early death at age 27. The author dares suggest what Doors fans find heretical: Morrison wasn't a very good sing

    I am a long-time Doors fan. I own all their music and still include it in my music rotation - nearly 40 years after my first exposure to them. Morrison was a very bright man cursed with uncommonly good looks and a ferocious thirst for large quantities of whiskey. The latter led him to an early grave. This book colorfully accounts for his genius and outrageous appetites that led to his early death at age 27. The author dares suggest what Doors fans find heretical: Morrison wasn't a very good singer - he was an awesome shouter and a reasonably good poet. His controversial on-stage antics and his physical beauty were what gave him such a huge public following. Had he survived his youth, he probably would have become a first rate poet/writer. A few years ago, my wife and I visited his grave at Pere la Chaise cemetery in Paris.

  • Greg

    For about a two month period of time in 11th grade I thought that The Doors were a really good band, and that Jim Morrison was not a douche bag. It was one of the dark times of my life. I read this book then and really liked it. Thinking back on it I know it's not a very good book, nor do I think The Doors are a very good band.

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