Going Long: Legends, Oddballs, Comebacks & Adventures

Going Long: Legends, Oddballs, Comebacks & Adventures

For more than 40 years, Runner's World magazine has been the world's leading authority on running—bringing its readers the latest running advice and some of the most compelling sports narratives ever told. From inspirational stories such as "A Second Life"(the story of Matt Long, the FDNY firefighter who learned to run again after a critical injury) to analytical essays su...

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Title:Going Long: Legends, Oddballs, Comebacks & Adventures
Author:David Willey
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Going Long: Legends, Oddballs, Comebacks & Adventures Reviews

  • Aj

    wonderful collection of short stories that combines fantastic writing with a compelling topic - the training for and the completion of the run. there were few in here that did not captivate my spirit and motivation. I felt particularly inspired by those featuring women runners and runners overcoming great obstacles. a good reminder that the biggest obstacle to overcome in running lies between our ears. my heart particularly warmed to two stories set in familiar locales: Westchester County, NY an

    wonderful collection of short stories that combines fantastic writing with a compelling topic - the training for and the completion of the run. there were few in here that did not captivate my spirit and motivation. I felt particularly inspired by those featuring women runners and runners overcoming great obstacles. a good reminder that the biggest obstacle to overcome in running lies between our ears. my heart particularly warmed to two stories set in familiar locales: Westchester County, NY and Warwick, NY.

  • Koji Kawano

    is a compilation of short but inspirational stories from Runner’s World Magazine about exceptional runners. Not all of them are distinguished or decorated runners. There are stories about everyday runners who have never placed in a race, whether it is an Olympics or local 5K run. But all 34 stories have motivational pull that every runner or wanna-be-runner will be benefited from reading. If I have to pick my favorites, they are Life and Limb by Bruce Barcott and Leading Men by Kenny

    is a compilation of short but inspirational stories from Runner’s World Magazine about exceptional runners. Not all of them are distinguished or decorated runners. There are stories about everyday runners who have never placed in a race, whether it is an Olympics or local 5K run. But all 34 stories have motivational pull that every runner or wanna-be-runner will be benefited from reading. If I have to pick my favorites, they are Life and Limb by Bruce Barcott and Leading Men by Kenny Moore. Life and Limb is a story about Tom While, who...

    .

  • Dave

    This was so close to amazing, but it contained a few stories that just didn't do it for me. The rest were amazing. It made me want to run and some days even got me out the door. I'd like to read stories like this to inspire me everyday. I highly recommend this to runners. I had a particular connection to some of the stories about the Boston Marathon and the Olympic trials and the Prefontaine Classic. I knew running had touched me, but it was neat to find out that I'd touched running in some of t

    This was so close to amazing, but it contained a few stories that just didn't do it for me. The rest were amazing. It made me want to run and some days even got me out the door. I'd like to read stories like this to inspire me everyday. I highly recommend this to runners. I had a particular connection to some of the stories about the Boston Marathon and the Olympic trials and the Prefontaine Classic. I knew running had touched me, but it was neat to find out that I'd touched running in some of those places.

    Gotta run.

  • Robert

    A great collection of articles from the magazine Runners World. If you enjoy running, or just enjoy good writing about people doing crazy things, I can't recommend it enough.

    But if you're considering being a runner -- if you're wondering what running is like -- you should probably read something else. These are some pretty unusual and extreme cases. People winning the Boston Marathon (kids! don't try this at home!), people losing limbs and coming close to death. Triumph, tragedy, and more sore m

    A great collection of articles from the magazine Runners World. If you enjoy running, or just enjoy good writing about people doing crazy things, I can't recommend it enough.

    But if you're considering being a runner -- if you're wondering what running is like -- you should probably read something else. These are some pretty unusual and extreme cases. People winning the Boston Marathon (kids! don't try this at home!), people losing limbs and coming close to death. Triumph, tragedy, and more sore muscles than you can throw a stick of Body Glide at.

    Fun and fascinating.

  • Billy McManus

    The great majority of works in this collection are wonderful human stories, giving insight into the meaning and fulfillment that people from a wide variety of people find in running. Among my favorites were all three of Kenny Moore's contributions, John Brant's articles about Team Hoyt and Terry Fox, Charles Butler's article about Matt Long, and Michael Perry's article about Ryan Hall. The one work that I found to be downright awful was Stephen Rodrick's account of his trip to Marathon, Greece p

    The great majority of works in this collection are wonderful human stories, giving insight into the meaning and fulfillment that people from a wide variety of people find in running. Among my favorites were all three of Kenny Moore's contributions, John Brant's articles about Team Hoyt and Terry Fox, Charles Butler's article about Matt Long, and Michael Perry's article about Ryan Hall. The one work that I found to be downright awful was Stephen Rodrick's account of his trip to Marathon, Greece prior to the 2004 Athens Olympics. Rodrick's article was one of the most repellently cycnical works I have ever read, and he seemed unable to control himself from spewing tenously related (and sometimes nonsensical) similes onto the page at every opportunity. In sum, this collection contains perhaps equal parts great, inspiring works and simply good works, as well as one pretty terrible work. For the most part, this is a great collection for someone who wants to broaden her perspective on running, or who simply enjoys stories of exceptional human spirit.

  • Shane

    Many great stories, I loved the first page of Finding my stride by Benjamin Cheeverss and the whole "Good race" part.

  • Carianne Carleo-Evangelist

    It didn't take me nine months to read it. I dipped in and out of the collection between other books. It's a solid, if slightly uneven, collection of stories that have appeared in Runner's World or are about Runner's World personalities i.e. Amby Burfoot. Personally I enjoyed the "behind the scenes" pieces on the icons - Boston Billy, Tommy Leonard, Joan Benoit the most. But introductions to people like Matty Long were wonderful in their every man relatability. A good read.

  • Celeste

    I bought this book on my Kindle because I like to read about running, especially when I train for races.

    This book is a collection of articles from

    , and that's basically the best way to describe it. The articles are written by different writers, but they are similar in style. This is both good and bad. It's bad in that they are edited into mediocrity, and it's good because when you jump from story to story it's not as jarring. Several of the articles were really good, and a few wer

    I bought this book on my Kindle because I like to read about running, especially when I train for races.

    This book is a collection of articles from

    , and that's basically the best way to describe it. The articles are written by different writers, but they are similar in style. This is both good and bad. It's bad in that they are edited into mediocrity, and it's good because when you jump from story to story it's not as jarring. Several of the articles were really good, and a few were just plain boring. It was a weird mix. I didn't like that I'd read a few of them already just by having read the magazine off and on for the last few years.

    Not a bad running book to read, especially if you don't already read

    , but expectations should be kept low.

  • Bethany

    Enjoyable (if you are a runner); this anthology of articles from Runner's World is definitely pretty neat. I occasionally found myself wishing they had added a post-script to various articles to give "the rest of the story."

  • Harshan Ramadass

    It's just me I suppose, but running is an addictive, joyful activity for me-I'd expect something similar from the writings too. Although well written, I don't want to read someone getting maimed, run over, or read about life struggles. As much as I admire about challenges of all those brave protagonists, my expectation was to read some exciting duels in the sport, or something crazy or positively uplifting.Boston 82 story was excellent , but that piece was the real oddball in an otherwise sorrow

    It's just me I suppose, but running is an addictive, joyful activity for me-I'd expect something similar from the writings too. Although well written, I don't want to read someone getting maimed, run over, or read about life struggles. As much as I admire about challenges of all those brave protagonists, my expectation was to read some exciting duels in the sport, or something crazy or positively uplifting.Boston 82 story was excellent , but that piece was the real oddball in an otherwise sorrowful ensemble.

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