Taggerung

Taggerung

Years ago, the vermin clan of Sawney Rath kidnapped one of Redwall's own-a baby otter, destined to become their "Taggerung," a warrior hero of ancient legend. But as young Tagg grows, he rebels against his destiny. The young otter journeys in search of his birthplace, a member of Sawney's clan always near, out to destroy the deserter. With the feisty mouse Nimbalo, Tagg fe...

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Title:Taggerung
Author:Brian Jacques
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Taggerung Reviews

  • Jacqueline

    My favorite Redwall book!

  •  Rogue

    I love all the redwall books, but I think this is my favorite. You can't help but love the otters!

  • Emily Collins

    By far,

    is my favorite of the Redwall series. It's such a classic plot - protagonist grows up believing he's an antagonist - but it's so artfully performed. Further proof that the redwallers have a natural instinct of what's good and what's evil (and that the ferrets and rats are bred into a society of antagonistic people).

    Some of my love of this book stems from the fact that I have always had a special place in my heart for the otters of redwall, and Bragoon was just especially badas

    By far,

    is my favorite of the Redwall series. It's such a classic plot - protagonist grows up believing he's an antagonist - but it's so artfully performed. Further proof that the redwallers have a natural instinct of what's good and what's evil (and that the ferrets and rats are bred into a society of antagonistic people).

    Some of my love of this book stems from the fact that I have always had a special place in my heart for the otters of redwall, and Bragoon was just especially badass. I've reread this book many times over the year, and found that each time it's still as exciting as the last.

  • Kathy

    In this 14th Redwall adventure, a baby otter is stolen from Redwall Abbey by the evil clan of vermin Juskarath to raise as their fearsome warrior champion, called "Taggerung". Meanwhile, his loss is mourned at Redwall but life goes on with much feasting, drollery and a series of riddles that will ultimately lead to a new Abbess of Redwall. But despite learning to become a fearsome warrior like they want, Taggerung rebels against their expectations of savagery and strikes out on his own. He makes

    In this 14th Redwall adventure, a baby otter is stolen from Redwall Abbey by the evil clan of vermin Juskarath to raise as their fearsome warrior champion, called "Taggerung". Meanwhile, his loss is mourned at Redwall but life goes on with much feasting, drollery and a series of riddles that will ultimately lead to a new Abbess of Redwall. But despite learning to become a fearsome warrior like they want, Taggerung rebels against their expectations of savagery and strikes out on his own. He makes many friends in his adventures, and makes his way back to Redwall in time to protect his old family from his marauding foster family. Lots of dashing derring-do, nearly incomprehensible accents (especially by the moles), luscious food and humor. No need to read all previous Redwall books, this stands on its own.

  • Leila

    I have always loved the Redwall series of books by Brian Jacques who uses animals for his tales and I bought every one the minute they came into the shops. 'Taggarund' is my favourite Why? It is different to the rest of the books and in my personal opinion a better read. The books are written primarily for young teen agers upwards and are always based on the good versus evil theme where good always wins out in the end but often at some cost. Shrews, weasels, rats, stoats and foxes tend to be alw

    I have always loved the Redwall series of books by Brian Jacques who uses animals for his tales and I bought every one the minute they came into the shops. 'Taggarund' is my favourite Why? It is different to the rest of the books and in my personal opinion a better read. The books are written primarily for young teen agers upwards and are always based on the good versus evil theme where good always wins out in the end but often at some cost. Shrews, weasels, rats, stoats and foxes tend to be always evil and the good creatures are mice, hedgehogs, moles, otters, badgers, hares and squirrels. Within the good versus evil as always, the author is never afraid to tackle some quite adult themes so there is hatred, violence, revenge, cowardice, murder and death but he counterbalances this with kindness, loyalty, trust, bravery love and even a touch of romance.

    There are no great battles this time. Instead there are three different plots within the story. The book begins with the first and most important plot. An evil vermin clan of creatures is searching for a mystical warrior named the 'Taggerund' whom they believe will bring them to great glory by defeating their enemies. Because of prophecies, they discover the creature they believe to be the chosen Taggerund is not of them but an otter babe and they kill his father and steal the babe who is brought up by the wicked chief of the clan as his own son. A problem they have though is that genes will out and the babe grows into a tough and strong warrior who has a heart and cares for others so he refuses to kill though commanded to by the clan chief. This means he has to escape the clan and the rest of the story involves all his many adventures in his quest to find his way back to his Mother and sister in Redwall.

    The second plot running through the story involves the cowardly creature Gruven, prompted by his ambitious Mother (who is determined that her son is the true Taggerund,) to set out with a few other members of the vermin clan to capture 'Tagg' and kill him.

    The third plot moves over to Redwall Abbey where there is no leader at this time. The story lightens with the author's usual gift of poetry and many references to the 'good life' the Redwallers have. There is much fun with 'the dibbuns' (the little ones) always into mischief, but this is the third plot line where Tagg's Mother still grieves for her stolen son. His sister, through a huge puzzle involving the whole Redwall community which has to be solved, grows from an immature young girl into a potential Mother Abbess.

    In the final part of the story The author doesn't have a huge battle as in other books in the series and he ties all the ends up peacefully with justice meted out to those who deserve it.

    Redwall readers will be aware that the character Tagg is in contrast to another character in a previous book entitled 'Outcast of Redwall. In that one the Redwall creatures saved a baby ferret from dying and brought him up, but true to his nature he was a disaster, always lying, stealing, bullying hurting and in the end he ran away and returned to his vermin clan. In the case of Tagg he stayed true to his essentially good nature in spite of being brought up with the vermin clan. This book is the better of the two though. It is beautifully written and the character of Tagg in particular is really well drawn.

    I thoroughly enjoyed every minute of reading this book. It touched my heart many times and I recommend it to animal lovers young and old for some light reading and a lot of thoughtful themes about life for children to hopefully take on board.

  • Joseph Leskey

    This book was an especially enjoyable installment in the series, due to its noncomformity to the customary plots of

    . It was very useful to have at my veritable disposal whilst I battle the flippin' flu, wot?

  • Lauren

    Oh, Redwall: my first fandom love. My first fanfictions were of this book. As such, it holds a special place in my heart. I simply must re-read it soon. I'll post a more in-depth review afterwards.

    Of the entire series, The Taggerung was my favorite. Why? Well, I suppose it's because I loved the character of the Taggerung. :) The idea of the good guy being raised by the bad guys (and getting some wicked-awesome facial tattoos) was a very original and appealing thought to my pre-teen self (still

    Oh, Redwall: my first fandom love. My first fanfictions were of this book. As such, it holds a special place in my heart. I simply must re-read it soon. I'll post a more in-depth review afterwards.

    Of the entire series, The Taggerung was my favorite. Why? Well, I suppose it's because I loved the character of the Taggerung. :) The idea of the good guy being raised by the bad guys (and getting some wicked-awesome facial tattoos) was a very original and appealing thought to my pre-teen self (still is, actually). There were so many moments that I absolutely adored. Mr.Jacques was a master of writing the way these anthropomorphic animals acted, moved, and reacted with each other. I'm not entirely sure why otters aren't my favorite kind of animal - the way they move (and the way Mr.Jacques describes movement in the book!), oh... indescribably cool. Fluid, you know?

    I will update this review once I've completed re-reading the book. But I will leave you with this:

    I once adored this book so much, I wanted to commit it to memory. I can still recite the first two or three pages. I believed it that good. Read it!

  • Steve

    I was quite looking forward to this book, expecting a slight animal version of a lesser Gemmell warrior yarn - possibly with cute manly ferrets carrying swords to battle *laughing*. It wasn't. It was nowhere near Gemmell standards of either writing, spinning a damn gripping adventure, or more importantly; 'gripping characters of deep refinement'.

    So, what was it? It was a yarn about little ferrets, badgers, and hedgehogs *pmsl* (stop laughing! Sooo not funny!). It wasn't badly written, though it

    I was quite looking forward to this book, expecting a slight animal version of a lesser Gemmell warrior yarn - possibly with cute manly ferrets carrying swords to battle *laughing*. It wasn't. It was nowhere near Gemmell standards of either writing, spinning a damn gripping adventure, or more importantly; 'gripping characters of deep refinement'.

    So, what was it? It was a yarn about little ferrets, badgers, and hedgehogs *pmsl* (stop laughing! Sooo not funny!). It wasn't badly written, though it 'wasn't at all gripping'. As I posted in my comments whilst reading this book (I got as far as ch.3 before the senseless boredom really took over); it's a book to be read to ten or twelve year olds (maybe a clever eight year old *smiling* as I'm going by my own intellectual and reading growth potential here *pmsl* - I was a late developer *smiling*). I digress. It's not really large print and childishly simple, don't get me wrong <--Great song by Chrissy Hynde and The Pretenders btw. *pmsl*. Again, I digress ;) It's an intricate read that I expect many twelve year olds (or faster developers than I; eight year olds *laughing*) would enjoy being read to them (maybe).

    But I want a read that's gripping, exciting, deeply character based, and a bloody joy to read. A book that you stay awake extra hours for because you 'really want to know what happens'. This ain't it!

    I just started Scarrow's 'Under The Eagle' last night, and that 'is it!' I didn't want to put the book down, even as my eyelids were forcing themselves open!

    As for 'The Taggerung', I get that 'I won't get this time back when I'm dead' feeling *pmsl*. But, I'll give it 2 stars for the; 'read it to a smart eight year old' factor!

  • Adams321

    Like "Outcast of Redwall" this book has a lot of potential but fails to deliver. A baby otter, Taggerung, is kidnapped and raised by a gang of murderous vermin thieves. Then he grows up and is inherently good simply because he is an otter, and he refuses to participate in his gang's evil doings. He deserts the gang and embarks on a quest to find his true identity.

    I was hoping that the theme of morality would be explored, and Taggerung would mimic the behavior of his gang because that is what he

    Like "Outcast of Redwall" this book has a lot of potential but fails to deliver. A baby otter, Taggerung, is kidnapped and raised by a gang of murderous vermin thieves. Then he grows up and is inherently good simply because he is an otter, and he refuses to participate in his gang's evil doings. He deserts the gang and embarks on a quest to find his true identity.

    I was hoping that the theme of morality would be explored, and Taggerung would mimic the behavior of his gang because that is what he was brought up to do, but he would be conflicted about it because of his genetics, and he would struggle to choose between the life of evil he knows or an honest life. Or something like that. Like "Outcast" this book could have explored the nature v. nurture idea but failed. I don't think its plausible that this otter spends his entire life in an environment of violence and crime but he never does anything even remotely wrong. Because of genetics he is noble and honest, despite his upbringing. At least in "Outcast" there was some ambiguity as to how evil the outcast was. Taggerung is indisputably 100% good.

    I thought the relationship between the otter and his adopted father was interesting. The ferret loves his adopted son, but the otter doesn't love his adopted father; he only respects the ferret's leadership skills. This relationship should have been further explored. Another missed opportunity.

    Also, the ending was disappointing. When it seemed like the story was over and it should have been wrapped up with a final chapter or two, it keeps going for about seven more chapters. It seems like the author finished the story but decided it wasn't long enough and added more things near the end. I thought these things were anti-climactic and contributed nothing to the story (I can't elaborate without spoiling the end, but if you've read it you know what I mean).

    Despite its flaws, this book has some good plot twists and story elements. I give it two stars.

  • Riley Redgate

    oddly, i think this book about an otter adopted by evil ferrets in infancy is responsible for my lifelong obsession with antiheroes

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