Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs

Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs

The beloved, bestselling tale of edible weather is brought to life!If food dropped like rain from the sky, wouldn't it be marvelous! Or would it? It could, after all, be messy. And you'd have no choice. What if you didn't like what fell? Or what if too much came? Have you ever thought of what it might be like to be squashed flat by a pancake?...

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Title:Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs
Author:Judi Barrett
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs Reviews

  • Lstirl

    Mother nature cooks up a storm, literally, in this madcap story with plenty of silliness to go around.

    Ages 4-10

    The town of Chewandswallow has some wild weather, bringing meals like burgers, spaghetti, mashed potatoes, and of course meatballs three times a day. Then, things start to go crazy and odd things start happening, like an entire day of just gargonzola cheese and eventually a "tomato tornado" and the poor sanitation department could no longer keep up. This book uses such fun language to d

    Mother nature cooks up a storm, literally, in this madcap story with plenty of silliness to go around.

    Ages 4-10

    The town of Chewandswallow has some wild weather, bringing meals like burgers, spaghetti, mashed potatoes, and of course meatballs three times a day. Then, things start to go crazy and odd things start happening, like an entire day of just gargonzola cheese and eventually a "tomato tornado" and the poor sanitation department could no longer keep up. This book uses such fun language to describe weather effects, like drizzle, clearings, and downpour. The language is delightful and the illustrations, while not overly colorful, are still detailed and fun. The absurdity and silliness in this story make it a joy to read and the combining of two familiar concepts, food and weather, into one story are sure to stoke the imagination. Kids of this age group will love the fanciful, over the top, giant ideas presented in this book.

    About This Book

    Here's another wonderfully written and illustrated story by the Barrett team. Receiving a place on the prestigious New York Times Best Illustrated Children's Books of the Year list, this book skillfully and subtly blends funny storytelling and full-color illustrations with a very real twist about how weather can affect people's environments.

    Life in the wonderful town of ChewandSwallow is great: Some of its citizens even say it's downright delicious! Instead of snow, wind, or rain, they get a different kind of weather that falls from the sky three times a day: breakfast, lunch, and dinner. The only bad part about living in ChewandSwallow is that the people don't get their choice of what they'd like to fall from the sky: it may snow mashed potatoes, or rain juice or soup, or there might even be a storm of hamburgers that takes them by surprise. But no one is too worried about the weather, until it takes a turn for the worse — the portions of food get larger and larger and fall faster and faster, until everyone in the town fears for their lives. They all need to think of a plan, and they need one fast! With teamwork, smarts, and some extra-large bagels, Chewandswallow residents are able to save themselves from the torrential weather. A cheerful approach to gearing up for a science lesson or just for reading aloud, this book makes food and weather fun.

    A good review and I agree that it is a good starting point for a weather discussion, especially because of the great terms used in the story.

  • Lisa Vegan

    Oh, I just loved this book. The irony. I think this book hadn’t appealed to me that much because of the meatballs. Even though I like premises that are silly. First, I assumed the story would be all about meatballs but it was actually about all sorts of foods, and the main story is also actually a story within a story, and that worked really well. Also, in the back author bio section, the illustrator’s blurb in my edition says: “Mr. Barrett says his drawing of meatballs in no way endorses their

    Oh, I just loved this book. The irony. I think this book hadn’t appealed to me that much because of the meatballs. Even though I like premises that are silly. First, I assumed the story would be all about meatballs but it was actually about all sorts of foods, and the main story is also actually a story within a story, and that worked really well. Also, in the back author bio section, the illustrator’s blurb in my edition says: “Mr. Barrett says his drawing of meatballs in no way endorses their consumption. He’s a vegetarian.” This book was published in 1978, and I became a vegetarian (most of the time-it took me a while to make the transition fully) in early 1977.

    The story is funny and creative and entertaining.

    The illustrations are wonderful! I love how each picture, the black & white and the color ones, seem to be created using tiny lines. I just love the effect; I don’t know what the style is called though, but I know I appreciate it.

    This is a book about which I’ve always been curious so I’m really grateful it’s one of the June selections for the Picture Books group at the

    . The month’s theme is culinary. So far, this picture books group’s themes and books have all been wonderful!

    Now, I’m eager to read the sequel:

    .

    The story is fun and the illustrations are special. To sum it up: incredibly creative, imaginative, funny, really great illustrations, and the illustrator is even a vegetarian. So, it was my kind of book after all.

    So many good illustrations but the ones that most tickled my funny bone were Floyd's birthday party scene, a day when the weather provided only brussel spouts and peanut butter with mayonnaise, and the tomato tornado scene.

  • Kathryn

    I know I read this as a kid but for some reason it didn't leave me with a big "lasting impression" or any sort of feeling I could really latch onto when I thought about the book as an adult. So, I came to it fresh, in a way. And I was MAJOR impressed! The story is so much fun, so imaginative and hilarious (and a tad scary at times!) and it's the best sort of tall-tale, causing our minds to boggle even as we realize maybe some of it could have shadows of truth in the real world. It might even cau

    I know I read this as a kid but for some reason it didn't leave me with a big "lasting impression" or any sort of feeling I could really latch onto when I thought about the book as an adult. So, I came to it fresh, in a way. And I was MAJOR impressed! The story is so much fun, so imaginative and hilarious (and a tad scary at times!) and it's the best sort of tall-tale, causing our minds to boggle even as we realize maybe some of it could have shadows of truth in the real world. It might even cause us to ponder the role food plays in our lives. I wasn't sure that I'd enjoy the illustrations at first--the kids and mom at the breakfast table looked a tad odd to me--but I ended up falling in love with them! They were SO detailed and fascinating! And they added so much to the story! I loved the quirky little touches, like the movie theater playing "Breakfast and Tiffany's" and the like. So cute!

  • Ronyell

    “Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs” is a cult classic children’s book by Judi Barrett along with illustrations by Ron Barrett and it is about a magical town called Chewandswallow (chew and swallow, get it?) where food just falls from the sky and provides people with everything they need. But what happens when there is too much food falling from the sky? “Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs” is definitely one unusual and creative book ever created for children!

    Judi Barrett has certainly done an exc

    “Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs” is a cult classic children’s book by Judi Barrett along with illustrations by Ron Barrett and it is about a magical town called Chewandswallow (chew and swallow, get it?) where food just falls from the sky and provides people with everything they need. But what happens when there is too much food falling from the sky? “Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs” is definitely one unusual and creative book ever created for children!

    Judi Barrett has certainly done an excellent job at writing this story as it is full of creativity and excitement! I mean what other book talks about a town where food just falls from the sky and people just eat the food from the sky like nothing? That is what I really loved about this book since I never read a book about food falling from the sky and that proves just how imaginative Judi Barrett made this book from any other children’s book! Ron Barrett’s illustrations are extremely creative and gorgeous, especially when he illustrates the actual family’s life in black and white while the illustrations of the town of Chewandswallow is shown fully in color, which truly brings out the creativity of the make believe town. I also love the illustrations of the different kinds of food that falls from the sky, especially of the images of a dozen hamburgers falling from a storm cloud as it looked quite unusual.

    All in all, “Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs” is a truly brilliant book for children who are food lovers and just loves book about pure imagination! I would recommend this book to children ages five and up since the book might be too lengthy for smaller children and there are some intense scenes with the falling food covering the town that might scare younger children.

  • Theresa Marsala

    As one of my favorite books when I was a little girl~ I revisit this book every few years to see if it still holds up to what I remembered & loved.

    And It is still in my top 5 Favorite books of all time! The story is cute & endearing while being silly & playfully semi-serious at the same time. Plus the illustrations are just flat out amazing. Even after all these years of art enhancements & the digital art age~I still think this extremely detail-oriented cross hatch style of illu

    As one of my favorite books when I was a little girl~ I revisit this book every few years to see if it still holds up to what I remembered & loved.

    And It is still in my top 5 Favorite books of all time! The story is cute & endearing while being silly & playfully semi-serious at the same time. Plus the illustrations are just flat out amazing. Even after all these years of art enhancements & the digital art age~I still think this extremely detail-oriented cross hatch style of illustration is gorgeous and not seen much of anymore in art, much less in children's books. There are so many hidden gems drawn within each of the panels & the I still adore the subdued color pallet on some pages in contrast to the straight black & white illustrations. I also think it teaches the subtle lesson of "too much of a good thing"

  • Calista

    I saw previews for this movie and it seemed to ever-loving stupid to me. Still, I gave the book a chance and it was amazing. The idea is so fresh and new and unusual and strange. Why hasn't someone thought of this before now? The story is told as a bed time tale of a long time ago in a land far away. In this land, food falls from the sky. That sounds so messy. Being drenched in butter or soda so horrible.

    Still the art was amazing and the story inspired my imagination. Anything is possible in the

    I saw previews for this movie and it seemed to ever-loving stupid to me. Still, I gave the book a chance and it was amazing. The idea is so fresh and new and unusual and strange. Why hasn't someone thought of this before now? The story is told as a bed time tale of a long time ago in a land far away. In this land, food falls from the sky. That sounds so messy. Being drenched in butter or soda so horrible.

    Still the art was amazing and the story inspired my imagination. Anything is possible in the context of a story. Don't limit those possibilities. I love when a new idea lights me up.

    The kids liked this story from 1978 too. They thought hamburgers falling from the sky was amazing. They gave it 5 stars too. Great story.

  • Manybooks

    While

    is a fun romp, both the narrative and the illustrations show rather vividly how food can become a rather massive problem when it is uncontrollable or uncontrolled. The story actually seems to combine two European folklore traditions, the legend of the Land of Cockaigne, the so-called Schlaraffenland, a utopian land of milk and honey, where residents do not have to work and where food is not only readily available, but where fish, already cooked, swim in th

    While

    is a fun romp, both the narrative and the illustrations show rather vividly how food can become a rather massive problem when it is uncontrollable or uncontrolled. The story actually seems to combine two European folklore traditions, the legend of the Land of Cockaigne, the so-called Schlaraffenland, a utopian land of milk and honey, where residents do not have to work and where food is not only readily available, but where fish, already cooked, swim in the rivers, and the houses are made of gingerbread and candies, and the many fairy stories featuring uncontrollable cooking and food (magic pots that continue cooking porridge until the entire house is engulfed). There is a strong attitude present that free and magical food (and the fact that one does not have to do much in order to receive or eat it) is not only often too good to be true, but that it can easily have adverse effects if one is unable or in some cases, unwilling to control and master it.

    I have always enjoyed stories about food getting out of control, and the idea of an El Dorado like food utopia ending up as a dystopia really resonates with me, both tickling my funny bone and also making me think a bit. I wonder though if I would have seen the presented dystopic elements all that clearly in

    if I had read this story as a child (probably not). However, even as a child I loved stories like

    , where, as mentioned above, food grew on trees, the walls of the houses were made of gingerbread and the rivers flowed with wine and ready-to-eat seafood. And I remember actually trying to take a bite out of my bedroom wall (I was about five at the time) because I thought it might just be made of gingerbread (funny now, but I was rather disappointed when the bedroom walls did not turn into gingerbread for me, and also wondered how I would explain the presence of teeth marks in the wallpaper to my mother).

  • Alex ☣ Deranged KittyCat ☣

    In case you're wondering, I'm doing everything I can so I don't go back to the

    . :D

    Again, I didn't know this is a book. I've seen both animated movies and I liked them. This is a slightly different story, but it's beautiful nonetheless.

    We have a very nice grandpa telling his two nephews the story of the city of Chewandswallow, a city where people don't buy food at the store. The food just comes down from the sky instead of rain or snow.

  • Renuka

    The movie adaptation is wonderful and so is this book. I loved the illustrations!

    Although the plot is very plain and childlike (that's why it is a children's book) yet I loved it.

    I wish there were a place like Chewandswallow. :P

  • Jenny

    OK, this was really my favorite book for most of my childhood. I would pretend to read it before I could actually read (I had simply memorized it from hearing it so many times) and I remember feeling sooo guilty about all the praise I got for being such a good reader at such an early age. Man alive! Really, I think my love for this book stemmed from the fact that I was a deprived child. Well, I suppose I was never deprived of health food like oatmeal and tofu, but I only got white bread with swe

    OK, this was really my favorite book for most of my childhood. I would pretend to read it before I could actually read (I had simply memorized it from hearing it so many times) and I remember feeling sooo guilty about all the praise I got for being such a good reader at such an early age. Man alive! Really, I think my love for this book stemmed from the fact that I was a deprived child. Well, I suppose I was never deprived of health food like oatmeal and tofu, but I only got white bread with sweet (or sugary rather) peanut butter @ friends houses. I'm pretty certain I was only friends with some kids for the access to junk food that visits to the their homes allowed me. That being the case, you can imagine what the prospect of a world where such delights fell from the sky and were all mine for the taking would do to me. My plan was to catch extra portions of the foods I liked and hide them under my bed so that I could have whatever food I wanted whenever I wanted it, and nobody could stop me. Yes, while some kids were dreaming of being astronauts and ballerinas I was dreaming of stockpiling junk food under my bed. Sounds about right.

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