Plenty

Plenty

With his fabulous restaurants and bestselling Ottolenghi Cookbook, Yotam Ottolenghi has established himself as one of the most exciting talents in the world of cookery and food writing. This exclusive collection of vegetarian recipes is drawn from his column 'The New Vegetarian' for the Guardian's Weekend magazine, and features both brand-new recipes and dishes first devis...

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Title:Plenty
Author:Yotam Ottolenghi
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Edition Language:English

Plenty Reviews

  • ·Karen·

    NEW! With ADDED UPDATES!

    This cookbook is so full of ZING and OOMPH that it can hardly be contained on the shelf, it buzzes and fizzes and sizzles and clamours to be taken down, lovingly caressed, and drooled over.

    How fusion is this? Ottolenghi was born and brought up in Jerusalem of an Italian-born father and a German-born mother. He obviously has zero preconceptions or fixed ideas in his head about what to eat with what: dinner in our house this evening consisted of roast sweet potatoes, spic

    NEW! With ADDED UPDATES!

    This cookbook is so full of ZING and OOMPH that it can hardly be contained on the shelf, it buzzes and fizzes and sizzles and clamours to be taken down, lovingly caressed, and drooled over.

    How fusion is this? Ottolenghi was born and brought up in Jerusalem of an Italian-born father and a German-born mother. He obviously has zero preconceptions or fixed ideas in his head about what to eat with what: dinner in our house this evening consisted of roast sweet potatoes, spiced with ground coriander and salt, served with a crême fraîche dip that was jazzy with vivid flavours of grated ginger, lemon grass, and the zest and juice of two limes. And all on the table within thirty five minutes - yeah! And fantastic - oh wow yes. Yes.

    Another true revelation: the roast parsnip and sweet potatoes with cherry tomatoes and a caper vinaigrette, five stars for that one. And also the lentils with Gorgonzola and semi-dried tomatoes, that could turn into my new version of soul food.

    Great stuff here too:

    You'll never eat meat and two veg again.

    Update: Chickpeas with Carrot and Swiss Chard, another excellent combination. The amounts are a bit nouvelle cuisine though. Recipe for 4? Only if you have at least one course before and two to follow, like a dégustation menu or summat. Us two ate it ALL.

    ANOTHER UPDATE! See how much fun this is? I want to cook from it

    Asparagus has begun to appear on the market stalls now - Asparagus Mimosa - makes that satisfying pee smell.

    Lentils with Celeriac and Hazelnuts and Mint: weeeeeell, a little mint goes a long long way. But lovely variety of textures and the mint softened a bit as you went along.

    But gorgeous: Ragout of Mushrooms with a poached egg. The recipe called for a duck's egg, but not knowing any friendly ducks, we made do with a normal, run of the mill, (organic) chicken egg, cooked to perfection using Ottolenghi's method: Let the egg slide gently into

    water and then remove from heat immediately. Allow to sit for six minutes. The slight disadvantage is that you can only do one egg at a time - or use loads of pans - but then the eggs keep in warm water. And we only needed two, so not too long a wait. And the whole thing was probably vastly improved by the use of baker hubby's own sourdough bread, which more than compensates for the lack of duck's egg or truffle oil.

  • Lynne King

    What a fabulous selection of vegetarian recipes and photos. I cannot wait to start cooking! I'm not a vegetarian but it makes me tempted to become one.

    I would recommend this to everyone, especially those who don't like cooking, as it definitely encourages one to do so.

    Also a super birthday or Christmas present.

  • Miriam

    Jonathan Lovekin's food photography is splendid, if not exactly ground-breaking. (Is there ground to break in food photography?)

    It may seem a bit odd to start a review of a cookbook by talking about the illustrations, but in this case I think they're one of the main selling points of the book. This isn't a criticism of Ottolenghi's food -- the recipes are interesting and most of them look quite tasty. However, Ottolenghi is a famous chef and food columnist, and almost every recipe (in fact, ever

    Jonathan Lovekin's food photography is splendid, if not exactly ground-breaking. (Is there ground to break in food photography?)

    It may seem a bit odd to start a review of a cookbook by talking about the illustrations, but in this case I think they're one of the main selling points of the book. This isn't a criticism of Ottolenghi's food -- the recipes are interesting and most of them look quite tasty. However, Ottolenghi is a famous chef and food columnist, and almost every recipe (in fact, every single one I looked up, although I didn't check them all) is available on the internet. Also, the index is not great (it's arranged by primary ingredient but secondary ingredients are not listed), so I found it actually easier to google specific recipes rather than searching through the book. In short, I enjoyed the book but am glad I got in from the library as I don't need to own another large cookbook that I rarely consult.

    Most recipes involve a large variety of ingredients -- ones most casual cooks are unlikely to have at hand -- and a number of steps and preparations that might be intimidating to inexperience cooks; however, most of the recipes are not technically difficult. That is, they rarely involve things needing to be cooked to very precise temperatures or times, or by methods that can easily go wrong (sauces that "break" for instance). Also, he often notes which steps can and can't be done ahead of time, which is helpful in planning.

  • Trish

    This is a beautiful cookbook with spectacular ideas. Stuffed onions? It makes you want to try everything the same day you see it. I tried a few...didn't have time for the whole shebang, but I came away with the thought that the individual pieces here are excellent. Unusual, really, but excellent. In the time I had the book I did have a little trouble figuring out exactly how to use some of the dishes with my repertoire. They are good, undoubtedly delicious. But not by themselves, especially. The

    This is a beautiful cookbook with spectacular ideas. Stuffed onions? It makes you want to try everything the same day you see it. I tried a few...didn't have time for the whole shebang, but I came away with the thought that the individual pieces here are excellent. Unusual, really, but excellent. In the time I had the book I did have a little trouble figuring out exactly how to use some of the dishes with my repertoire. They are good, undoubtedly delicious. But not by themselves, especially. They'd have to fit with with whatever else was going on.

    The book is not vegan, but I think many of the recipes could be veganized easily. And the vegetarian dishes are pretty restrained on the animal products.

    Everything just looks so good! I will say I didn't like the

    as much as I anticipated, mostly because it was a little sweet for me. We had two

    already sweet vegetables, which has the effect of concentrating the sweetness. Ottolenghi then adds some sweetner in the vinagrette, which I thought unnecessary. Also, much as I love the idea of capers with this meal, it seemed like gilding the lily. It's hard to make the argument for further dressing roasted vegetables, already so easy and so good. Small quibble. It was great cold, maybe even better.

    Tried the

    , an excellent filling salad that is great for travel/work/leftovers. And it is just too easy to modify to suit what one has on hand.

    Would love to work with this a little longer.

  • Ivonne Rovira

    As so often occurs — especially with cookbooks — how much you’ll appreciate Israeli-born and London-based celebrity chef Yotam Ottolenghi’s cookbook

    depends on who you are. Serious foodies eager to try vegetarian and vegan dishes will thrill at the intricately crafted dishes with exotic ingredients like Taleggio cheese, quail eggs, duck eggs, tamarind pulp, truffle oil, preserved lemon, grapeseed oil, ground dried Persian lime, the Middle Eastern grain called freekeh, kaffir lime leaves —

    As so often occurs — especially with cookbooks — how much you’ll appreciate Israeli-born and London-based celebrity chef Yotam Ottolenghi’s cookbook

    depends on who you are. Serious foodies eager to try vegetarian and vegan dishes will thrill at the intricately crafted dishes with exotic ingredients like Taleggio cheese, quail eggs, duck eggs, tamarind pulp, truffle oil, preserved lemon, grapeseed oil, ground dried Persian lime, the Middle Eastern grain called freekeh, kaffir lime leaves — well, you get the idea. For serious foodies, this book is a five-star find!

    Incipient vegetarians will also love this cookbook. Every single recipe is vegetarian, and many are vegan. Too many are billed as appetizers (“starters” in Brit-speak), but most of those could be stretched into a nice dinner. The variety of vegetable-based dishes will astound the reader, many with a Middle Eastern flair.

    While foodies and vegetarians may love this book, Midwestern soccer moms — short on time and access to exotic ingredients — not so much.

    Still, even for cooks whose idea of exoticism runs more towards tabbouleh,

    , from-scratch burritos, or

    cake that starts with a cake-mix box, there are about one or two dozen gems in

    — definitely worth the price if you can get the cookbook in the Kindle format for $3.99 on sale, as I did. Otherwise, check the book out of the library and copy down the dozen recipes that you can adapt and actually use.

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