The Borrowers Aloft

The Borrowers Aloft

Pod, Homily, and Arrietty Clock -- the family of tiny Borrowers -- think they have at last found an ideal home. They've moved into a house in a miniature village built as a hobby by a retired railroad man. The village is the perfect size for the Borrowers, and after the hardships they've faced, the Clocks gratefully settle into the luxury of having a "proper" house. The ea...

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Title:The Borrowers Aloft
Author:Mary Norton
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The Borrowers Aloft Reviews

  • Laura

    I've always liked "hidden" sequels, ones that most people don't read and/or know existed (like those to

    . Norton doesn't disappoint Borrowers fans with this one, which is more about their lives than their borrowing.

  • Pikachukirby99

    This book is a funny life-changing book that keeps you from putting it down. I learned that there are people under our noses who use the stuff we lose when they find it.

  • Nicki Hinkle

    This one was even better than the first installments! It was written much more excitingly! There was never a moment when I felt that the narrative dragged on or that things were over explained or skipped over too lightly. I found myself racing to turn the pages!

    If you've never read the Borrowers series, now is the time. These books are quite timeless and no one would think they were written in the 50's and 60's. They must have been well before their time because so much of the tech and invention

    This one was even better than the first installments! It was written much more excitingly! There was never a moment when I felt that the narrative dragged on or that things were over explained or skipped over too lightly. I found myself racing to turn the pages!

    If you've never read the Borrowers series, now is the time. These books are quite timeless and no one would think they were written in the 50's and 60's. They must have been well before their time because so much of the tech and inventions folks used are still around today.

    My favorite part of this book is Little Fordham, the model, that seems to have been made for the Borrowers. I love tiny model villages and the descriptions of Little Fordham and all the work that Mr. Pott's and Miss Menzies have done to make this as correctly displayed as possible. The detestable Mr. & Mrs. Platter do make a good village, despite that it's there to compete and bring in money, as opposed to Little Fordham, which is just a labor of love. The descriptions of the interiors of the homes, the scale replicas of the churches and streets, and yes, even a working train in the village! I encourage anyone with an affinity for models, trains or dollhouse sized construction to read this book. If nothing else, to get ideas for your own villages!

  • Melody

    Another solid entry in the saga. I found this and its immediate predecessor to be much stronger, much more engaging than the first two. I love the ingenuity the borrowers show, I adore that Pod listens to Arrietty with respect and admiration, and Spiller is almost (dare I say it?) sweet. Homily is a pain, but in a realistic way.

  • Lisa

    I read the Borrowers series once or twice as a kid, but they never caught on with me in the same way as other books. But now, on rereading, I find them completely charming: beautifully imagined, nicely framed (except for Afloat, which I don't like as much), and actually pretty philosophical. Of course, the Krushes' illustrations are delightful, as always. I'm so glad I rediscovered these books!

  • Shelly♥

    This is the fourth book in "The Borrowers" series, the children's story that supposes that little people who live under the floor take all the things that are missing. In this book, our little Borrower family - Pod, Homily and Arriety - move into a miniature village called "Little Fordham". A rival mini village proprietor and his wife steal them away intending to put them on display for all to see. As the cage is prepared, the Borrowers are locked away in an impossibly high attic. How will they

    This is the fourth book in "The Borrowers" series, the children's story that supposes that little people who live under the floor take all the things that are missing. In this book, our little Borrower family - Pod, Homily and Arriety - move into a miniature village called "Little Fordham". A rival mini village proprietor and his wife steal them away intending to put them on display for all to see. As the cage is prepared, the Borrowers are locked away in an impossibly high attic. How will they escape?

    This was a very good book. I loved the twists and turns in this tale and the introduction of yet another "bad intention" human trying to profit from the little folks. The ingenious of the Borrowers is truly imaginative in this book as they explore the attic to maximize their captivity and try and plan their escape. My boys loved it, too. There were nights towards the end that we read extra chapters to move the story along.

    Classic children's series for sure!

  • Robin

    I continue to be charmed by Mary Norton's engaging description of goings-on in the adult world for an audience of children. In this installment, we get five full chapters of the delightful Mr. Pott and Miss Menzies and the deplorable Mr. and Mrs. Platter. (You just *know* that if the Platters were transposed out of England in the 1800s and into modern day America, they would be Trump voters. In fact, I think I can identify their doppelgangers in my own extended family. Human nature is predictabl

    I continue to be charmed by Mary Norton's engaging description of goings-on in the adult world for an audience of children. In this installment, we get five full chapters of the delightful Mr. Pott and Miss Menzies and the deplorable Mr. and Mrs. Platter. (You just *know* that if the Platters were transposed out of England in the 1800s and into modern day America, they would be Trump voters. In fact, I think I can identify their doppelgangers in my own extended family. Human nature is predictably disappointing that way.) These opening five chapters hint at what is going on in the life of Arrietty, Homily, and Pod, but withhold all details, giving the child reader of this book the experience of changing her perspective to that of the outside observer, encouraging them to develop their curiosity about the world and appreciate how differently others must see it.

    After just two short chapters of Arrietty's new life in the model village, we skip straight into the most perilous peril yet. Norton deftly allows the initial caper to happen off the page between chapters, so as not to create an artificial plot climax too early in the book, switching perspectives back to the adult world to give hints of what has happened without us actually getting to experience the scene. When we pick up the story with the Clock family, they are proving as resourceful and brave as always, working as a team to overcome all obstacles and emerge victorious from their dangerous situation. The cover of the book rather gives away their inevitable means of escape from their strange prison, so the pleasure is in watching them work it out, iterate, and practice, operating as a semi-efficient team. (There are some feminist rumblings late in the book from Arrietty, who is quite understandably miffed that Pod and Spiller want only to talk to each other about balloon technology, despite it being Arrietty's idea and Arrietty's skill at reading that allowed them to master it.)

    All in all, this is my favorite installment of the series, because there are so many perfect details. The adult characters are true to life and memorable, the peril is terrifically compelling, the small bits of philosophizing are well-placed and gentle enough to sink deeply into a child's brain and help them form clear opinions about how people ought to treat other people. The writing is as lovely as ever. I wish it lasted longer than just one more book after this one.

  • Nikki

    I found this one so unsatisfying to reread. It goes nowhere, and it's becoming ridiculous how often the Borrowers just have to move on and move on and move on, never satisfied. I did like the touch of romance between Spiller and Arriety -- I hope the final book doesn't take that away -- and I do like the little details of the world Mr Pott and Miss Menzies create.

    I'm sad that there's no sign of Mrs May or Kate anymore: they've vanished out of it, even though as far as I'm concerned they were as

    I found this one so unsatisfying to reread. It goes nowhere, and it's becoming ridiculous how often the Borrowers just have to move on and move on and move on, never satisfied. I did like the touch of romance between Spiller and Arriety -- I hope the final book doesn't take that away -- and I do like the little details of the world Mr Pott and Miss Menzies create.

    I'm sad that there's no sign of Mrs May or Kate anymore: they've vanished out of it, even though as far as I'm concerned they were as important to the story as the Borrowers, in their way. And the questioning element about their existence is totally gone. It isn't a story being told, but facts being laid out. The Borrowers are really captured, really about to be put on display... It could still have worked, with the right narrator to tell the story, but this book isn't framed that way. And somehow, it takes the uncertain enchantment out of it, rather than making it feel more real.

    I do love the details of the world Mr Pott creates, and the loving attention he puts to it, and even the kindness of him and Miss Menzies. I always love the attention to detail, the thinking put into figuring out how these tiny people would survive, but...

    Thinking about it now, in one way, the ending of this book is satisfying for that very reason. The harsh electric light in the Clocks' house that Mr Pott made, it isn't right for them, for the story. They have to go away and begin somewhere anew, somewhere they can make themselves, with their own hands and using their own skills. They have to go back to where they won't be seen, where they can flirt with the boundary between reality and fantasy.

    It's nice to think of it that way.

  • Kimberly Karalius

    While this one was still good (Arrietty starting to have feelings for Spiller was very cute), not a lot happened and a big portion of the book was from the humans’ POV (the very beginning of the book), which was interesting but made me wonder when we’d get to the Borrowers themselves.

  • ☽¸¸.I am¸¸.•*¨ The ¸¸.•*¨*Phoenix¨*•♫♪ ☾

    Pod, Homily, and Arrietty finally reached the ideal village they risked their lives to get to. This turns out to be a miniature village built as a hobby by a retired railroad man. Arietty, made brave by the newly acquired stability, befriends a

    and the family ends up being kidnapped. They will have to do the unthinkable to escape... again!

    I enjoyed this series very much. I started reading it because I am a big fan of the anime, and I continued because I liked the books. Of course, yo

    Pod, Homily, and Arrietty finally reached the ideal village they risked their lives to get to. This turns out to be a miniature village built as a hobby by a retired railroad man. Arietty, made brave by the newly acquired stability, befriends a

    and the family ends up being kidnapped. They will have to do the unthinkable to escape... again!

    I enjoyed this series very much. I started reading it because I am a big fan of the anime, and I continued because I liked the books. Of course, you can tell they are "classics", and certainly they contain some references no child's book today would make (like to

    ), but overall they were a cozy, wholesome read. I liked this last one all right, especially the first part.

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