Sister

Sister

Nothing can break the bond between sisters ...When Beatrice gets a frantic call in the middle of Sunday lunch to say that her younger sister, Tess, is missing, she boards the first flight home to London. But as she learns about the circumstances surrounding her sister's disappearance, she is stunned to discover how little she actually knows of her sister's life - and unpre...

DownloadRead Online
Title:Sister
Author:Rosamund Lupton
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Sister Reviews

  • Stacey (prettybooks)

    is a psychological thriller from the viewpoint of Beatrice. Beatrice communicates to her missing sister Tess through a letter or diary-like entries. The plot is centered around her attempts to find out the truth about Tess's disappearance.

    I loved this book. Another reviewer described it as a "crime fiction novel for people who don't like crime fiction" and I agree with that description. I've read a few crime fiction novels and really enjoyed them (e.g. the Millenium trilogy) but it can b

    is a psychological thriller from the viewpoint of Beatrice. Beatrice communicates to her missing sister Tess through a letter or diary-like entries. The plot is centered around her attempts to find out the truth about Tess's disappearance.

    I loved this book. Another reviewer described it as a "crime fiction novel for people who don't like crime fiction" and I agree with that description. I've read a few crime fiction novels and really enjoyed them (e.g. the Millenium trilogy) but it can be a difficult genre to get right. I always feel overwhelmed when entering the crime section of a bookstore or library, faced with hundreds of books that look and sound the same. However,

    stood out to me because it has a beautiful cover and not one you would associated with a crime investigation. It's serene as opposed to bold and bloody. I would have assumed it was more of a family drama novel and I believe this novel bridges the gap between the two genres.

    is an extremely easy and captivating read - I particularly enjoyed the ethical debates concerning medicine - and I'm not surprised that it was on the UK bestsellers list for so long.

    I wrote this initially to be a 'personal review' so it's not very

    , but I'm sure my enthusiasm for the book still comes across ;)

  • Mari Biella

    A very enjoyable debut from Rosamund Lupton,

    follows the narrator, Beatrice, as she attempts to uncover the truth about the disappearance of her free-spirited sister Tess. As other readers have commented, the blurb on the back cover is a tad misleading: it suggests that

    The plot

    A very enjoyable debut from Rosamund Lupton,

    follows the narrator, Beatrice, as she attempts to uncover the truth about the disappearance of her free-spirited sister Tess. As other readers have commented, the blurb on the back cover is a tad misleading: it suggests that

    The plot is very cleverly constructed, drawing you right into the heart of the mystery while simultaneously withholding one vital fact, a fact which will only be revealed at the very end of the novel. For pages and pages you think you are in step with Beatrice in trying to probe the circumstances surrounding Tess's disappearance, learning new facts as she learns them; then, with just a few pages to go, you realise that possibly the most important element of the plot has been hidden from you all along - hinted at (you realise with hindsight), but never actually revealed. Some other Goodreads reviewers, I notice, appeared to find this annoying, but I thought it pretty breathtaking, and take my hat off to Lupton's narrative skills.

    I got through this one in an evening or two, and found it by turns touching, humorous and, indeed, surprisingly creepy. The use of language was beautiful, and the narrative structure irresistible. This may be Lupton's first novel, but I can safely say that I'm already looking forward to reading her follow-up.

  •  Li'l Owl

    Beautifully written. Heartbreakingly sad.

    Potently emotional. Brilliantly executed. Terrifyingly realistic. Happy ending? You decide.

    Undeniably one of the best novels out there.

    It is absolutely amazing that this is

    's first novel. I was so riveted to the pages that I lost three hours of time before coming up for air. I'm looking forward to reading more novels by this undeniably talented writer! Highly recommended!

  • Amanda

    This is a great summer read. Not because it is light and fluffy, quite the opposite, but because it is the kind of book that keeps you up very late at night to finish and it's good to be on vacation and not need to get up for work or to get kids ready for school the next morning. That is how I read it. In one night. Stayed awake til after one am to do so. Something about the way the author constructed the plot and the unfolding revelations kept me turning the pages. The shifting tenses and backw

    This is a great summer read. Not because it is light and fluffy, quite the opposite, but because it is the kind of book that keeps you up very late at night to finish and it's good to be on vacation and not need to get up for work or to get kids ready for school the next morning. That is how I read it. In one night. Stayed awake til after one am to do so. Something about the way the author constructed the plot and the unfolding revelations kept me turning the pages. The shifting tenses and backwards way of looking forwards ( if that makes sense) was an unusual but effective style.

    I realized almost immediately after beginning this book that the blurb on the back and the phrase on the front are misleading. You find out very early on that the fate or location of Bea's sister is not in question. It's the who and why that needs to be revealed. Its a very well done, darkly imagined story with a, for me, unexpected development at the end. I hesitate to cheapen it with the twist label because looking back, clues to that development were laced subtly throughout the narrative and made me really curious to get to the end to find out what she was alluding to. I just didn't expect it to be that.

    I don't have a sister, but I can imagine that if I did I'd be calling her today.

  • Florence (Lefty) MacIntosh

    This isn’t a roller-coaster ride, rather than a thriller I’d call it psychological-suspense. Even rather than fast-paced with a pervading sense of menace, an uneasiness that quietly builds. Beatrice the successful level-headed older sister arrives from New York to unravel the mystery surrounding Tess’s death. Her flighty artistic kid sister who in her own condescending and slightly superior fashion she deeply loved.

    Beatrice undergoes a journey of self-discovery when she moves into her sister’s s

    This isn’t a roller-coaster ride, rather than a thriller I’d call it psychological-suspense. Even rather than fast-paced with a pervading sense of menace, an uneasiness that quietly builds. Beatrice the successful level-headed older sister arrives from New York to unravel the mystery surrounding Tess’s death. Her flighty artistic kid sister who in her own condescending and slightly superior fashion she deeply loved.

    Beatrice undergoes a journey of self-discovery when she moves into her sister’s seedy London flat, rubbing shoulders with students and artists, the sort of riff-raff she normally shuns. But treating everyone like a potential suspect erodes her credibility, her confidence is replaced by paranoia, her polished veneer stripped away. Along with the mystery it was the maturing of Beatrice’s character that kept me turning the pages.

    While the female characters are portrayed with empathy the men are such stereotypes. Beatrice’s fiancé Todd (are men even still called Todd??) is weak & shallow; her only friend Kasia’s boyfriend an abuser in definite need of some anger management classes. Pretty common in books target-marketed too women, I prefer a little more balance. Find it sorta boring and done to death. A well written and impressive debut – looking forward to her next novel, hopefully she’ll buck the trend.

    Bottom-line an easy read that’s smart & insightful; kept me riveted. In its genre of psychological-suspense

  • ~ Becs ~

    So, Sister by Rosamund Lupton. I know I’m a few years behind the times with this one and, in truth, I’d not come across this author before but I was sat in the hairdressers enduring the endless wait for my hair colour to take when I noticed a girl across the waiting area whose hair was a shock of foils sticking out in every direction only she didn’t look anywhere near as bored as me. In fact, she was completely devouring a dog-eared paperback, absolutely engrossed. I squinted across the room and

    So, Sister by Rosamund Lupton. I know I’m a few years behind the times with this one and, in truth, I’d not come across this author before but I was sat in the hairdressers enduring the endless wait for my hair colour to take when I noticed a girl across the waiting area whose hair was a shock of foils sticking out in every direction only she didn’t look anywhere near as bored as me. In fact, she was completely devouring a dog-eared paperback, absolutely engrossed. I squinted across the room and could just make out the word ‘Sister’ and surreptitiously retrieved my phone from my bag, scrolled through Amazon until I found the book and ordered myself an ebook! I wanted to be that engrossed, that lost in a book.

    I have to confess that, once I’d started, the style took me a little while to settle into. It’s written in second person POV and I found it a little jarring at first. The narrative is, by and large, addressed to ‘you’ and I had to keep reminding myself who it was actually aimed at. It’s not a style you see very often in novels and it took me several chapters to get used to it and finally get into the flow of it but once I did, there was no turning back. It’s highly intriguing with the story being drip fed to us the readers tortuously slowly but deftly managing to keep just the right amount of suspense to keep me turning the pages.

    It takes place in London in winter but this is not a sparkly, romantic Winter Wonderland. No, this is a bleak midwinter with an overwhelming air of sadness and grief that permeates just about every page. The despair is just palpable and there’s some really desperately sad, touching moments here. As spring slowly starts to reveal itself in the book, so do the mysterious facts as we inch inexorably towards the dramatic conclusion.

    And it really is a dramatic conclusion – Rosamund Lupton is playing tricks on us and I truly didn’t even realise for a very long time but, when you know, it’s obvious but I’m almost tempted to reread with hindsight and just relish the clever ruses she deploys on us! My only gripe is the ending – as so often in books, I wanted more. I needed the next two scenes handed to me on a plate, to see the aftermath and hear what happens to everyone and to get their explanations but, sadly, it’s not to be. I guess it’s the hallmark of a good book that the author leaves you itching for me but, miserly as I am, I’m knocking off half a star for it – I give Sister 4 1/2 twisty stars. Great page turner – would make a good film.

    So, to the girl in the hair salon, even if you don’t know it – Cheers love for a fab recommendation!

  • Charlotte May

    This was a pretty good mystery/thriller. Beatrice has always been close to her sister Tess, but after moving to the States they grow more distant. So when Beatrice gets a call from her mother to say that Tess has gone missing, she jumps on the first flight home to London.

    Told as a narrative, as Beatrice recounts it to her lawyer, al

    This was a pretty good mystery/thriller. Beatrice has always been close to her sister Tess, but after moving to the States they grow more distant. So when Beatrice gets a call from her mother to say that Tess has gone missing, she jumps on the first flight home to London.

    Told as a narrative, as Beatrice recounts it to her lawyer, along with frequent flashbacks to the time in which she is retelling, I found the way the story progressed to be interesting and slightly different from the norm.

    *Mild spoilers* as Beatrice returns home, it comes to light that her sister was pregnant, shortly after, it becomes known that she gave birth but the baby died. So when Tess’ body is found, everyone believes it was suicide. But was it?

    I enjoyed following Beatrice as she unravels the sinister events that led to her sister’s death. We learn that their younger brother died of Cystic Fibrosis as a child, which heavily impacted their family, and possibly Tess’ baby.

    When everything eventually came to light I was slightly confused. Without spoiling it, a lot of the information involved is heavily medical, and went right over my head. So even now having finished to book I still can’t entirely understand what the motive behind it all was.

    But overall, it was a mystery done well. I didn’t guess the culprit and I liked Beatrice as a character. 3 stars ⭐️

  • Edith

    What rating do you give a book that definitely holds your interest and keeps you reading any time you can snatch a chunk of time, however small, yet leaves you disappointed and irritated when it ends? Which is more important - constantly being kept pulled into a story or coming away at the end of the book a satisfied reader???

    I do not recall where I read the review that led me to queue up for this book at the library (and the line was long, believe me), but I noticed that most of the Goodreads r

    What rating do you give a book that definitely holds your interest and keeps you reading any time you can snatch a chunk of time, however small, yet leaves you disappointed and irritated when it ends? Which is more important - constantly being kept pulled into a story or coming away at the end of the book a satisfied reader???

    I do not recall where I read the review that led me to queue up for this book at the library (and the line was long, believe me), but I noticed that most of the Goodreads reviews are 4 and 5 stars so I figured I was in for a good read. The plot line is fully explained in the Goodreads blurb (perhaps too fully?) ... and I was keen to know the resolution to the ‘mystery’which is why I kept reading, but the ending got progressively nuttier and I found the final chapters to be quite unsatisfying. It just became too unrealistic...characters were doing and saying things that I could not buy. More than once I said “oh, puhlese". Bohjalian’s “The Double Bind", with its ending that irritated the heck out of me, came to mind when I finished this book - same sense of disappointment in the resolution of the story.

    I did find the genetic cure for cystic fibrosis scenario fascinating... the germ of a really good story was there... I just wish the author had devised a more plausible ending.

  • Victoria

    Initially, I really enjoyed this book. It opens up and immediately grasps readers with its unique perspective - the book is narrated by one sister directly to her deceased sister, catching her up on what has been happening since her death. It really gives an interesting frame to the novel and its actions. There is a lot of emotion in this book - and Lupton does a wonderful job of conveying a realistic relationship between these two sisters.

    Unfortunately, the ending spoiled the entire book for me

    Initially, I really enjoyed this book. It opens up and immediately grasps readers with its unique perspective - the book is narrated by one sister directly to her deceased sister, catching her up on what has been happening since her death. It really gives an interesting frame to the novel and its actions. There is a lot of emotion in this book - and Lupton does a wonderful job of conveying a realistic relationship between these two sisters.

    Unfortunately, the ending spoiled the entire book for me. It is one of those manipulative endings with a surprise so shocking that it completely detracts from the entire build-up of the book. The final conflict and resolution are rendered pointless. Despite the manipulative end twist, other parts in the plot felt predictable, which slowed the action down quite a bit in sections. Lupton introduces a lot of interesting information about cystic fibrosis here which adds a lot to the overall storyline, but her betrayal to the reader just soured the book past the redeeming point for me. I don’t like books that seem to revel in tricking the reader, and it just felt especially disappointing have such a promising beginning (and middle) of the book.

  • Richard

    I'm no longer taking Amazon's recommendations for suspense novels. I was recently disappointed by A Discovery of Witches, and now Sister is getting a big push. Two more boring "thrillers" are hard to imagine. Sister follows snobby, racist Beatrice as she investigates the disappearance and possible murder of her free-spirited sister. Actually, Beatrice has already solved the crime, and is telling the story to a policeman in a series of sessions - which is as annoying a narrative structure as I ha

    I'm no longer taking Amazon's recommendations for suspense novels. I was recently disappointed by A Discovery of Witches, and now Sister is getting a big push. Two more boring "thrillers" are hard to imagine. Sister follows snobby, racist Beatrice as she investigates the disappearance and possible murder of her free-spirited sister. Actually, Beatrice has already solved the crime, and is telling the story to a policeman in a series of sessions - which is as annoying a narrative structure as I have ever encountered. The structure only reinforces the repetitiveness of the narrative, and spends far, far too much time detailing Beatrice's coming and goings (She's in transition. Get it? GET IT? DO YOU GET IT YET? WELL, IT'S GOING TO CONTINUE, ANYWAY.). Sister is unusual in that it deals seriously with the depth of Beatrice's grief, a subject that is glossed over in many otherwise similar novels. The thing is, it's glossed over for a reason - it's dead boring, and endlessly repetitive. As another reviewer noted, Beatrice's reliability is slightly called into question as certain aspects of the story ring false, but I personally feel that the flaws are in Lupton's writing and are not intentional. Finally, I don't want to head into spoiler territory, but given the ending of the novel... the herrings are too red, and the reveal is a terrible "Had I But Known" cliche.

Best Books Online is in no way intended to support illegal activity. Use it at your risk. We uses Search API to find books/manuals but doesn´t host any files. All document files are the property of their respective owners. Please respect the publisher and the author for their copyrighted creations. If you find documents that should not be here please report them


©2019 Best Books Online - All rights reserved.