A Woman's Worth

A Woman's Worth

With A WOMAN'S WORTH, Marianne Williamson turns her charismatic voice--and the same empowering, spiritually enlightening wisdom that energized her landmark work, A RETURN TO LOVE-- to exploring the crucial role of women in the world today. Drawing deeply and candidly on her own experiences, the author illuminates her thought-provoking positions on such issues as beauty and...

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Title:A Woman's Worth
Author:Marianne Williamson
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Edition Language:English

A Woman's Worth Reviews

  • Aman

    When you've gone to hell and made it back - this book speaks to you because it's about the path back. It's more about breaking free, finding joy, finding yourself, and learning to love yourself. Being a woman in a patriarchal society ends up being an adventure that tests every strength a woman is born with and toys with every weakness that was created by the world. It's a great book to show you the most positive productive path to attaining your worth as a woman. Very empowering for a sensitive

    When you've gone to hell and made it back - this book speaks to you because it's about the path back. It's more about breaking free, finding joy, finding yourself, and learning to love yourself. Being a woman in a patriarchal society ends up being an adventure that tests every strength a woman is born with and toys with every weakness that was created by the world. It's a great book to show you the most positive productive path to attaining your worth as a woman. Very empowering for a sensitive soul in today's society.

  • Sharon Jones

    One of my favorite books!

    Love Marianne Williamson!! Proverbs 31:10b PRICELESS:-)

    Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate. Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure. It is our light, not our darkness, that most frightens us. We ask ourselves, who am I to be brilliant, gorgeous, talented, fabulous? Actually, who are you not to be? You are a child of God. Your playing small doesn't serve the world. There's nothing enlightened about shrinking so that other people won't feel

    One of my favorite books!

    Love Marianne Williamson!! Proverbs 31:10b PRICELESS:-)

    Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate. Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure. It is our light, not our darkness, that most frightens us. We ask ourselves, who am I to be brilliant, gorgeous, talented, fabulous? Actually, who are you not to be? You are a child of God. Your playing small doesn't serve the world. There's nothing enlightened about shrinking so that other people won't feel insecure around you. We are all meant to shine, as children do. We were born to make manifest the glory of God that is within us. It's not just in some of us; it's in everyone. And as we let our own light shine, we unconsciously give other people permission to do the same. As we're liberated from our own fear, our presence automatically liberates others.

  • Leslie Raddatz

    A Woman’s Worth by Marianne Williamson

    I see how my experiences in life are true to this process of being the princess and ultimately entering into the Queen stage of life.

    Example:

    I experienced a lot of severe parental neglect, physical, emotional, sexual abuse: molestation and rape. I developed Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, somatization and conversion disorders. For a long time, I was unhappy and felt like a victim. As I went through therapy and started to heal and understand Post Traumatic

    A Woman’s Worth by Marianne Williamson

    I see how my experiences in life are true to this process of being the princess and ultimately entering into the Queen stage of life.

    Example:

    I experienced a lot of severe parental neglect, physical, emotional, sexual abuse: molestation and rape. I developed Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, somatization and conversion disorders. For a long time, I was unhappy and felt like a victim. As I went through therapy and started to heal and understand Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, I made the transition from victim into a SURVIVOR (Queen).

    I decided instead of letting my abusers win, by my silence, I would find my voice to help others learn how to cope with mental illness and their past traumas so they can live a happy life. Taking a negative and turning it into a positive by writing my memoir.

    This book is a must read. This is only one part of the book it talks about relationships, spirituality and positive thinking.

    I am very inspired by this author and this is the first book I have read by her. I look forward to reading her other books.

  • Solaris

    Language is incredibly beautiful. Poetic even.

    I for one love this book. And it is not about aggressive feminism. It is very much a book for learning about the soul underneath all exterior expectations, and internal personal expectations----that we put on ourselves, and then discover that who we really are all along is good. Beautiful. Right. There was nothing wrong with us to begin with. What the book offers the reader to consider is an awareness and an embracing of ourselves that had me

    Language is incredibly beautiful. Poetic even.

    I for one love this book. And it is not about aggressive feminism. It is very much a book for learning about the soul underneath all exterior expectations, and internal personal expectations----that we put on ourselves, and then discover that who we really are all along is good. Beautiful. Right. There was nothing wrong with us to begin with. What the book offers the reader to consider is an awareness and an embracing of ourselves that had me realize that I am the queen I have been striving to be all along. And quietly celebrating that on multiple levels of our existences.

    In a nutshell: Being OK with ourselves. Self-love. Self-respect. In a divine and emotional approach. It is not religious, it is not preachy. It is an offering to look at woman and at oneself in a new light in addition to what we already thought we knew.

    Whatever you believe, the book is eloquently written and it is a pleasure in itself to read each sentence. Words flow off the pages like song.

  • Ileana

    "When we love a man, we love from the bottom of all souls, from our source, from the center of things, from God. If men only knew what a blessing our love is. Ad if we only knew what a blessing it is to be loved by them. To say "I love you" and to mean it is the same thing as saying "God bless you."

  • Katrina

    Some of her writing and ideas seem a little too much for me. Too needy or whiny or something like that. Still, there are some great moments in this book and my favorite quote of all time, which has been attributed to Nelson Mandela, but is actually hers:

    "Our greatest fear is not that we are inadequate, but that we are powerful beyond measure. It is our light, not our darkness, that frightens us. We ask ourselves, "Who am I to be brilliant, gorgeous, handsome, talented and fabulous?" Actually,

    Some of her writing and ideas seem a little too much for me. Too needy or whiny or something like that. Still, there are some great moments in this book and my favorite quote of all time, which has been attributed to Nelson Mandela, but is actually hers:

    "Our greatest fear is not that we are inadequate, but that we are powerful beyond measure. It is our light, not our darkness, that frightens us. We ask ourselves, "Who am I to be brilliant, gorgeous, handsome, talented and fabulous?" Actually, who are you not to be? You are a child of God, your playing small does not serve the world. There is nothing enlightened about shrinking so that other people won't feel insecure around you. We were born to make manifest the glory of God within us. It is not just in some; it is in everyone. And, as we let our light shine, we consciously give other people permission to do the same. As we are liberated from our fear, our presence automatically liberates others."

    Marianne Williamson

    Author of Return to Love, and A Woman's Worth

  • Shaun

    This was given to read as homework by my career coach as I transition into a new career at the young-old age of forty-seven.

    It was okay. There were a few ideas that really resonated. One is the idea that feminism isn't necessarily always about establishing equality, but instead about establishing different but not necessarily better. Acknowledging the power, beauty. and necessity of the feminine energy. Feminism is about embracing all that is feminine.

    I also appreciated her thoughts on aging. I

    This was given to read as homework by my career coach as I transition into a new career at the young-old age of forty-seven.

    It was okay. There were a few ideas that really resonated. One is the idea that feminism isn't necessarily always about establishing equality, but instead about establishing different but not necessarily better. Acknowledging the power, beauty. and necessity of the feminine energy. Feminism is about embracing all that is feminine.

    I also appreciated her thoughts on aging. I have never felt happier, sexier, more self-assured, more capable than I do now. If aging is bad, an aging female is often viewed as the worst of the bad. I don't believe that. The years have given me so much more than just wrinkles. I have wisdom, experience, depth, perspective. If wrinkles and a few aches and pains are the price for what I've gained as a person over the years, I think I've gotten a damn good bargain.

  • MotherCrow

    I loved this book at first, the encouragement, the wisdom that women should under all circumstances support one another. Then I got to the page where she refers to certain women as sluts and whores (and then she does it again! in the next chapter). I picked up this book because of her other compassionate, wise, powerful writing, but this one doesn't quite fit. It's uplifting in places, yet preachy and judgmental in others. If we are going to uplift all women then we need to be compassionate

    I loved this book at first, the encouragement, the wisdom that women should under all circumstances support one another. Then I got to the page where she refers to certain women as sluts and whores (and then she does it again! in the next chapter). I picked up this book because of her other compassionate, wise, powerful writing, but this one doesn't quite fit. It's uplifting in places, yet preachy and judgmental in others. If we are going to uplift all women then we need to be compassionate towards ALL women with the understanding that some act like sluts and whores because they don't know better and because they need help. This book was written a long time ago (90s I think) so perhaps its time for a rewrite/revision?

  • Aaron

    No one woman can tell you your worth. She contradicts herself in the book about the only one point she really makes concerning what she THINKS women want and cannot handle relating to work and success. Her stories only disregard the entire population of women but her idealisitic veiw. It sounds like a bunch of complaining to me. The way the entire population of women express and orient themselves should be honored as their free will based upon their values, beliefs and worth not Williamson's.

  • Whitney

    1/14/15 - I first picked this book up because I felt like I was at a place in my life where needed to read something affirming, and empowering, from a woman's perspective. I liked that this one is short, written relatively simply, and is spiritual without being overtly religious. I figured if it turned out to be a bit too "mushy" or "new agey" for my taste, it would at least be a quick read, a week or two max, and I would be able to cull a few chunks of positive, general wisdom. Well, it's been

    1/14/15 - I first picked this book up because I felt like I was at a place in my life where needed to read something affirming, and empowering, from a woman's perspective. I liked that this one is short, written relatively simply, and is spiritual without being overtly religious. I figured if it turned out to be a bit too "mushy" or "new agey" for my taste, it would at least be a quick read, a week or two max, and I would be able to cull a few chunks of positive, general wisdom. Well, it's been nearly three months, and I'm only about 2/3 through. Should I slog through to the end, in the hopes I'll be able to salvage something worthwhile, or just give up and move on?

    So what caused me to loose enthusiasm for this read? At first I marked several meaningful passages, but haven't done so for at least the last couple chapters. I'm currently stuck in the chapter about sex, which is full of sweeping absolutistisms that border on troublesome sexist stereotypes. Actually, I have struggled with this issue since the beginning, but forgave the author because I figured writing about women as a whole population and their generalized spiritual life issues is difficult without using broad strokes. I figured I knew what she "meant". It's just so much more pronounced in this particular chapter though, it makes me physically cringe at times. I appreciate when she focuses on masculine and feminine traits, which exist within all men and women, and discussion of how damaging it is that the feminine is so often repressed in our culture. However I do not so much appreciate the frequent digressions into "men are like this, and women are like that", or "women SHOULD xyz..." as if we're all the same. Oh, and excessive slut shaming and body shaming too. How unenlightened of the author, to presume the quality of someone's life based solely on her appearance.

    My struggles with this book also include the rambling paragraphs of meaningless mumbo jumbo. Nonsensical sentences stacked one after another with little discernible relation between them or the surrounding topical paragraphs. Almost nonsensical filler text, like loripsum, but with a new age flavor. I consider myself to have pretty good reading-comprehension, but I literally reread entire pages full of significant seeming statements and had no idea what I had just read or how it related to the supposed topic of the chapter. Scanning back through, now I can't find any specific examples though, and I'm actually rediscovering lots of seemingly good passages. Was I just in a bad headspace and didn't get it? Or is my issue a phenomenon of the writing style, that individual passages sound good in isolation, while scanning, but as a whole it doesn't make much sense? It's a toss up.

    I loathe abandoning another book and I might still get something out of this one, so I suppose I will continue, if only to just check it off as complete.

    2/26/15 - I eventually did trudge through and finish this one. Ugh. The chapter about motherhood was the worst. I know multiple worthwhile women who have no interest or desire in being mothers. But the author seems to think they are wrong, because apparently a woman's primary purpose (and worth!) is her physical AND spiritual capacity to nurture life/the world. According to the author, a woman is incapable of finding fulfillment while denying motherhood. Barf. I'm sure they, and the millions others who are childless and happy, would disagree.

    The brief, emotional section on abortion made me want to hurl the book across the room. I'm sorry, but don't talk about the pain and suffering you ASSUME all women who have abortions feel, unless you're ALSO going to talk about the grief and struggles of women who give up their babies for adoption... And while we're at it, the struggles of actually becoming a mother too! Just to be fair and enlightened about such a complex topic, ya know. Ugh. And all of this rant is kind of ironic, because personally I do want to have a baby, and experience motherhood, and I feel unfulfilled because I'm still waiting... So this awful chapter also speaks to me somewhat in its intended context. I guess I can just understand the issue from other points of view while feeling my own feelings too. So did this supposed spiritual guru help me deal with said feelings? Nope. She just made me angry for being so judgmental of my awesome friends who own their own bodies and make their own choices for their lives and already know their worth. :P

    That's hardly the end of the patriarchal nonsense. Nary a page after the abortion stuff is this:

    “During the recent presidential election, Hillary Clinton was attacked for having the audacity to be a strong woman with a mind of her own [lol, she still is 25 years later!]. I understand her predicament very well. But there's another side to the Hillary question [What question was that?]. It's great that she takes an active role politically [indeed!], but [...wait, is that a hint of condescension?] one of her most important functions as First Lady is to help Bill Clinton emotionally, to provide him and their daughter with the feminine, intimate, personal support that every person needs in order to live most powerfully in the world [oooooooh, so THAT'S what a wife is supposed to do for her worldly working man husband, because this is really a marriage/family metaphor!]. Every prospective First Lady is now asked what she would do if she got the job. Jacqueline Kennedy had said [notice the use of passive voice] that her greatest service...would be [passive again] to take care of John Kennedy. There was a time when I would have found that an unliberated answer [because it IS]. Today I find it sublime, sane, and feminist. [Feminist?! WTF]

    “It is feminist because it honors the role of the feminine—nurturing, care giving, compassionate, loving—whether it is performed by a man or a woman.” Yeeeeeah..... This word you keep using. I don't think it means what you think it means. And where in there discussed how men should nurture and support their women?! SMH. And so is Hillary, all the way to the 2016 election, if she CHOOSES to run, that is.

    But seriously. All I got out of this passage was some contradictory weirdness about how women are supposed to take care of their husbands and families AND maybe also be independent and empowered too, but not really because then they're not nurturing heir families enough. Oh, and men too... somehow. I think???

    The whole book was like this for me.

    ANYHOOT in conclusion: I'm downgrading this from two to one stars. It is dated, baby-boomer, patriarchal, new age flavored tripe, masquerading as spiritual feminist empowerment.

    Perhaps one might get something out of it if one's empowerment comes from fitting snuggly into the "traditional" womanly role assigned at birth according to one's visible genitalia. The world would be a better place if we all would just accept that role graciously and willingly, wouldn't it. Then, women (and feminine traits) wouldn't HAVE to be second class to men (and masculine traits), because we would all be settled comfortably in our assigned "equal" places!

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